New answers tagged

0

Nice! I'm trying a similar thing on a triangular kind of pattern, but I'm getting the issue that the shape is getting rounded toward the middle Bottom image is sort of what I'm going for, minus the gaps in between.


3

On each object, prior to merging, give it an additional UV map with the name of the other object's UV map. After merging the objects, it will merge these individual UV maps. Although note that when you create an additional UV map, it will have the same UV values as the selected UV map, so you might want to do whatever you want to these-- there's no such ...


6

I've just added those few nodes at the start of your tree and I thing that's what your trying to achieve. Here is what it gives me.


0

You can edit the normal map as much as you want, just use the good spectrum of colors, so use the eyedropper. If you blur the image then the 3D relief will be softer, if you put other colors than the normal spectrum you'll have dark spots:


3

When opening a new texture, Blender doesn't know it's meant to be a single user copy. You should Remap the old texture instead, so it'll change for all materials at once. Add your 'new texture.jpg', with a second copy (new texture.001) for the non-color variant Open Outliner > Scene Right click the 'old texture.jpg' and go > Remap users > 'new ...


2

The textures have Alpha channel perfectly set up as a mask. So you only need two mix nodes. Click to enlarge But I'd recommend making four separate textures instead - Color, Roughness, Metalness and Bump. Then you just plug them all into one shader and save yourself the trouble with mix nodes :).


2

If you're talking about image textures you can save them in a folder: go in the Image Editor or UV Editor > Image > Save As: If your image is packed, meaning it is part of your file and not in a folder (to pack an image, go into the Image Editor or UV Editor and Image > Pack, to pack all your images go into File > External Data > Pack All ...


14

Use two brick textures. The trick is thinking of one that can be used as a mask to mix the original texture with some other color, the white elements will be one texture, the black elements will be a color (or a different texture if plugged to the other socket of a mix color node). On the second brick texture play with scale Mortar size and Brick, until you ...


3

These lines are visible also in the original texture. So to get rid of this you would have to use some image editor to compensate it. Here I used Photoshop's Box Blur filter with range 1 px that wasn't enough so I used it twice, but you loose some details. Original Box Blur 1 px Box Blur 1 px applied twice There are probably better algorithms for ...


0

As a beginner, i had problems with the solution to find the menus and to understand it. Found this video and it helped me a lot -> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MH7Xdol5erw


2

This answer is almost the same as @moonboots.. Your texture is based in Object space, and is a 3D spherical gradient. So the glowing volume (limited by the Color-Ramp) is a sphere around the object origin. What shows on the surface is its intersection with that sphere. As the surface gets further away from the object origin, it intersects with less and less ...


1

You can adjust the colors with a ColorRamp node. The result won't be the same, but you can get close. Left: Roughness Map Right: Reflection map adjusted with ColorRamp


3

Actually the problem is that you're deforming the object in 3D. The material setup, that works fine for a 2D object, will deform in 3D. You could fix that with the Mapping node, but as you want to animate the pupil, you need to find another solution, because animating with the Mapping node would be a bit tedious. A quick way to do it is to create an empty, ...


1

Your topology is messy, when you unwrap Blender has no choice but to connect the faces, which gives stretched UVs. If we take a look at the corner we first see that the vertices are not connected, the face continues inwards: Delete it, then you see that this edge floats: Delete as well and cut again with the knife: Now delete the face on the left and see, ...


3

You can get glowing eyes by using a Spherical Gradient shaped further with a ColorRamp, and run through and Emission Shader. To get the "Pupils" in the right place, you will have to use individual Mapping Nodes for each, and position them manually (based on the shape/position of your mesh(s)). Since it's just black and white, you can get away with ...


1

Don't apply the subdivision modifier. This makes the geometry unnecessarily dense. Re-meshing may have solved your problem but this will not hold up. Also smart UV unwrap isn't the best way to unwrap because of lack of control. Instead make creases and then unwrap using U>Unwrap>Unwrap. Also learn about edge-flow. This is very important when modelling.


0

Solved it by: Go to sculpt mode Re-mesh the object with Ctrl+R Add and Apply a Subdivision Modifier to increase topology definition again Shade Smooth Smart UV unwrap


2

To make the pond shape, start by subdividing a plane (the less the better - you will see why later). Make your rough "splat" shape by selecting the faces that won't be part of it and deleting them. Because the plane is subdivided, it will become "blocky looking" if and when we add a Subdivision Surface Modifier, so the first step is to ...


4

You could do something like this. It's just 2 Noise textures, one multiplied (to transfer the darks) and the other added (to transfer the whites), both mixed with an orange basecolor, which when combined with a high metallic value gives the cooper-ish look similar to your reference image. You can change the amount of light/dark by adjusting theColorRamps. As ...


1

The problem with the data transfer modifier not transferring seams is that the original model didn't have any UV seams marked. To fix this, select the original model, change to the UV editing layout, and select Seams From Islands. Now, in the data transfer modifier of the low poly model, Switch to Nearest Face Interpolated for best results in this scenario. ...


1

I found a workaround: Open the ply model im MeshLab. Go to Filters->Textures->Convert PerVertex UV into PerWedges UV (it may say it is missing the texture. If it does, copy the texture file into the MeshLab program directory. May be a bug or I am too stupid :P ) Then go to Filters->Texture->Transfer: Texture to Vertex Color.... The standard ...


0

So the eventual answere to your problem is microdisplacements It is a concept that if you have enough uniform geometry in your mesh , you can displace you mesh in different directions to form some interesting patters or designs , to use it , you can Add a plane and subdive to get upto 10k faces Add a displace modifier and select add texture In the texture ...


2

There's a solution that doesn't even need any unwrap, but of course it only works if you don't care about not having UVs: Use the Image Texture's Box option instead of Flat. This way the texture is projected on each side of the object. The Blend option allows you to have smooth transitions between the X, Y and Z projections. A good thing is probably to also ...


1

You have UV Sculpt enabled (hotkey is Q, maybe it's not terribly hard to hit it by accident)in the UV Editor's "t" panel. Hit t to show the panel, navigate to options tab and disable it or just hit Q while in UV Editor to get out of UV Sculpt mode:


1

In this particular case, you might try using an RGB Curve node to directly model the bump depth you want in the node viewer. To preserve some surface detail, you might also try dividing your subsurface map to bring down the overall scale. This one was done with microdisplacement: And bump:


6

You can create a curve, give it extrusion in the Properties panel > Object Data > Geometry > Extrude, then give it a material that is a mix between a Transparent and an Emission node with a Texture > Musgrave Texture as factor (in Eevee don't forget to choose Alpha Blend in the material settings). In the Mapping node, stretch the texture on one ...


2

There are a couple of ways you can mix them. The way I would suggest is to keep your PBR material setup connected to the Principled BSDF, and then run your MSPAINT image through a Diffuse BSDF and mix the two using a Mix Shader. As you can see from the image, I mixed them using a converted Black and White version of the original image as a mix factor. This ...


1

Thanks brockmann, I figured it out from your links. mat = bpy.data.materials.new(name="Material") mat.use_nodes = True bsdf = mat.node_tree.nodes["Principled BSDF"] color_ramp = mat.node_tree.nodes.new("ShaderNodeValToRGB") color_ramp.color_ramp.elements[0].color = (0.2,0.8,0.7,1) mat.node_tree.links.new(bsdf.inputs['Base Color']...


0

About the impact, using your already made object, I gave it the needed shader and got result. It's described like this: First, we get the Object Coordinates, sop we get the "-1 to 1" gradient. Then, using Separate XYZ we get the Z channel of the vector. Now, our Output is BW, going from -1 through 0 and then 1. After this, we use a math node, ...


5

Gray sockets are for scalar (single e.g. 0.73 or 512.256) values, and blue sockets are for 3D vector values such as <0.0, 0.707, 0.707> or <5.1, 8.2, 3.3> (one for each axis). Since Blender supports vector displacement, the Displacement socket is now a vector socket. When you link a scalar to a vector socket, the three vector components all ...


4

Most textures have a detail slider, but oftentimes it's better to mix in another noise texture at a smaller scale. One of the biggest giveaways that you're looking at a rendered object is a lack of variation. Looking at the following object, it's painfully obvious it's a render. We can generate some noise to break up the base color and it gets much better. ...


6

You could create a material that would be a mix between Voronoi (Distance to Edge mode) and Noise, with a bit of Emission in order to fake translucency: Then add a particle system with a collection of gravels. To vary the amount of each gravel, use the Use Count option:


0

If the Scale value of the Wave Texture node is low the problem won't be noticeable, maybe this is what's happening in his video: Another way to fix the problem is to use concentric circles for your topology (right hat):


9

Delete Data Transfer modifier. Create a UV map. Create a new image in the image editor. In the low poly object's material nodes, click the blue thing to make it a separate material from the original object's. Unlink the image from the Principled BSDF and select the new image. In the original material, plug the texture into the Material Output. Select the ...


1

If I understand correctly you would basically do def locations_to_image(objects, image_name='Locations'): im = bpy.data.images.new(image_name, len(objects), 1) i = 0 for ob in objects: im.pixels[i:i+3] = xyz_to_rgb(ob.matrix_world.translation) i += 4 return im def xyz_to_rgb(xyz): # Replace with however you want locations ...


0

I figured it out. I'd tried to think too much and the solution can be very simple. As nodes variable is already a list, I can simply tell the system which map belong to diffuse etc. Instead of if mat.node_tree.links.new(img.outputs[0], prxy.inputs[5]): spec = img nodes = [k for k in node if isinstance(k, spec)] ...


0

Ok so I solved it in the end. It would seem that it was because of some internal faces which were located near the eyes. I deleted those and rebaked and now it works :D


0

There is an excellent step by step tutorial by Simon Thommes, starting at 1h30 here> https://youtu.be/8LD5UA_Zktg?t=5376


4

There are just three things you need to get such result: A studio lighting HDRI (like this one shipped with Blender) Shiny metallic material (Metalness=1, Roughness=0.2) Transparent background (RenderTab > Film > Transparent) Rotate the HDRI to your needs, and add white background through compositor :).


0

All your object is actually made of seperate meshes as we can see if you do a simple unwrap: So in Edit mode select all and AltM > Merge By Distance, then unwrap again. Also it is very high poly, are you sure you need so many faces? In that case press AltJ to untriangulate, then CtrlE > Un-Subdivide, choose the ratio in the Operator box, then unwrap ...


0

If you create a new default UV map for an object, each quad face is given the entire UV canvas. Disclaimer here, I think this only happens if you have first deleted every other UV map on the object, otherwise the previous UV map just gets duplicated to the new slot. So if you are confident that you can unwrap your object again, it should be easy at this ...


10

If you're ok with using a shader, something like this can be accomplished by a single Noise Texture, run through a ColorRamp to give a harsh cutoff to the tops which forms the flat sections. This is just a simple example - if you want more variation in size, you can combine different noise textures of different scales until it's more to your liking. Remember ...


7

Quadriflow remesh will remove any UVs you have, one solution is to use Data Transfer modifier on the remeshed version, to transfer UVs from the photoscan to the remeshed version, use settings in the image below, you should also place both meshes in the same location, and preferably hide the photoscan Another solution is to use the Remesh Modifier instead of ...


2

You have to click the little down arrow in the modifier options. The apply option is hidden underneath:


1

I figured It out! I noticed the UV is flipped when I compared Blender to Substance so I flipped it in Blender and manually aligned it and it's fixed now!


1

hope i understand your request. you need a non rectangular plane to be displaced, right? I think best way should be insert a plane, subdivide it, select and remove not necessary vertex. Then add the modifiers you need. in the image you can see a displace modifier with cloud texture and subsurf added. Them you can unwrap (you can do that in ortho top view ...


2

You can save "edge data" like that in the form of seams on UV maps. Use "seams from islands" operation in UV editor to select what your seams would have been for that UV map. Can also maintain multiple copies of your model, and use a data transfer modifier to copy seam status (or all sorts of other edge statuses.)


6

If you're just looking for the frosted glass effect, try something like this. Basically it's just a high transmission value (for transparency/translucency) and a mid-level(ish) roughness (to make it more opaque - "frosted"). I added a bit of subsurface as well, but it's probably not needed. The "Bump Map" setup is optional too, but I just ...


5

Just to add to @Allen's answer. If you also want the borders, just add a brick texture into the setup


5

If you take a Voronoi Texture's Randomness parameter all the way to 0 it generates squares like you want. You can take the Color output into a Noise Texture like you suspected and generate lots of different outputs. What I did here was put a Color Ramp on the other side set to Constant to isolate groups of these squares to use as a mask for whatever you ...


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