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2

A Shader, or BSDF (Bidirectional Scattering Distribution Function), is the math definition for calculating light bounce. Different shaders such as Diffuse and Glossy have different definitions. Materials are datablocks that can be applied to meshes. Think of it as a real material in the world (like wood). Textures are images that mostly add photorealism to ...


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You can get there using Displacement on a higly subdivided mesh. Bump and Normal maps are faster, but will only get you so far. Choose either Displacement only or Bump only depending on your needs.


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if you want to mix two normal maps, take a look at this question, which explains very well how to do it: How to Combine two Normal Maps?. However, to create a more visible bump effect, try to use the Bump node, and plug the bump map into the Height socket, as here: I think this setup gives you more control via Strength and Distance values. You can also ...


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You still need to see the snow in order to tell that it is snow. Otherwise you could simply follow the tutorial and then turn off the lights. Boom! Now that's what snow looks like at night (all black). If your aim is to make a cinematic nighttime snow storm then you want to follow the same idea from a particle and physics perspective and instead tweak your ...


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Set the Z translation to 0 instead of -0.5 in the mapping node. What you are seeing here is a cross-section along the bottom of the sphere gradient, instead of the middle cross-section. Illustration :


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This is rather easy to do with an object that has a MultiResolution modifier as you mentioned. Such a mesh offers the possibility to bake the displacement from the base mesh to the subdivided one into a 32bit displacement map, and re-use that input for color ramps to drive the material color. Such a workflow also allows you to clearly distinguish between ...


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Delete the texture coordinates node. Delete the vector mapping node. Delete the image texture node. Add an Environment Texture Node, use the image in it and set it to Equirectangular.


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Yes. This made me realize the setup from my answer is not optimal. You want to simply get the length of the vector from your empty to the pixel on your mesh :


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To add transparency, push the "Transmission" slider towards the right under the "Principled BDSF" shader (The default shader). Make sure you are on Cycles.


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This isn't so much about Blender as physics. Real ocean water is very light. Like almost white. Aim your camera more downwards, to decrease reflections. Add a shallow seabed to better control your ocean color.


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This answer is a bit longer to fill in for Blender Manual. No worries, it's not at all technical. Subsurface slider Use this slider to scale Subsurface depth (which is in meters) to useful units (like milimeters). When set to 0, scattering is disabled, 1 means full scattering. Note: Values of around 0.01 are perfectly normal, since you're scaling down ...


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Good news. Blender will automatically convert these old nodes for you. Just get an older Blender version and copy/paste them. Download Blender 2.80 and create your material. Make sure the nodes are connected (or it won't work). Copy/paste the material into Blender 2.81+, and the nodes will get automatically converted. Copying materials from Blender 2.8 ...


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Without any screenshot is difficult to tell what's going on. Here some tips: You don't have the shader panel visible: You can split any area and choose what kind of editor show. You can create a new Workspace based on templates (click on the + next to the top tabs and choose GENERAL > SHADER). You don't have any nodes Select you mesh and click on "New" ...


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You might set transparancy based upon camera facing normals (ea not facing). (layer weight) To get something that looks a little bit smoother.


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If those islands are used to map a texture, they will map a solid color (representing one pixel of the texture). Such technique can be used to create pixelation. If they aren't used to map any texture, it doesn't matter. Then I'd reccomend scaling to 0,0001 instead of 0, so they can be scaled back up if needed :).


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You need to make one and unique material with this kind of node organisation (very simplified). You need to use the logo alpha output into the factor of the Mix Shader in order to make a mask and see the background. Of course the left part can be as complicated as you want, with Bump or Normal nodes plugged into the normal socket of the Diffuse etc:


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When Subsurface is 1, the Base color has no influence. Still you can use radius to extract different colors from the Subsurface color. Why it doesn't work for you You're using RGB Blue (0,0,1), so Red and Green cannot be extracted (as they're zero). Example I'm using some random Blue containing all three channels (RGB: 0.14, 0.19, 0.8): Subsurface = 1 (...


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Retopologizing is recommended often, but the truth is, retopologizing is an enormous amount of work, and many people lack the skills to do it properly. For this reason, there are often paid add-ons that help a lot, such as Retopo Flow. Assuming that isn't an option, there may be something you can do, but could be quite tricky, and there are no guarantees, ...


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The object's scale is too large or too small for Eevee to properly apply the shader. Apply the scale so that everything is in order. I just had the same problem and it solved the problem for me.


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I would reccomend ignoring the other setting until you need them and just use the basic functions


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Sounds like the same question as this question on black triangles See the comments on that question - The problem appears when using smooth shading on a geometry containing a vertex that is connected to more than one n-gon. Turn those faces into quads and it disappears.


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to my surprise the bge keeps glsl functions as strings until they're in use, but for some reason you can't use replace on them. Therefore if you want to share memory between a glsl shader and the bge you can do something like this below. worked great for me anyway. for i in range(257): f = """ varying vec4 maps[256]; void main() ...


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Different contexts also can have different context members. Context Access (bpy.context) The context members available depend on the area of Blender which is currently being accessed. The properties panel is a classic example. Looking at property panel code may come across context.material or context.modifier but will find them unavailable in ...


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You need to create a material by clicking on the NEW button in the Shader Editor header.


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Lowpoly occluded wire with Highpoly surface X-Ray disabled Lowpoly Viewport Display In Front enabled Display As Wire Standard X-Ray with occlusion The lowpoly wires stay visible even if the surface is not visible. Notable options to combine: Overlays > Shading > Hidden Wire Viewport Shading > Outline (off)


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If your object is high poly enough, you could try with Vertex Paint: Switch to Vertex Paint mode. It will automatically create a vertex paint group. Give it a name. Paint your object in black and white. Create an Input > Attribute node, in the Name field, type the vertex group you've created, plug its Color output into the Factor of a Mix Shader.


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I would use the normal output of the texture coordinate node and remap the values with a rgb curves node. For this you need to have your model's normals pointing in a global direction. Say you modeled the body along the XY plane, so the normals of the part where the cord is (I don't know the technical term) points towards the Z direction. So we will ...


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The green areas are where the baking rays have shot off the surface and penetrated an adjacent surface—which makes sense considering the divets in the lid. Try lowering your ray distance in your bake settings so they won’t shoot out so far and hit something else by mistake.


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Works just fine with the provided images. Perhaps you forgot to connect the alpha channel?


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This is only a preview for the material, and the white dots are reflection render. Don't worry about it.


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You can use viewport draw callback for rendering in the viewport. In your case, I would think of rendering a mesh with a small bias offset over existing meshes to avoid Z-fighting. Then making this mesh semi-transparent with appropriate blending modes to overlay the underlying geometry. Also do not forget to enable depth testing. You can use the GPU module ...


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Here is something that I got to work pretty well. It is a lil on the complex side (sorry). You could tweak the color ramps, sheen setting, and transmission to adjust the sheen to your liking. Hope this helps.


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I guess it begins with this kind of node organization: Texture Coordinate (Generated outp*ut) > Mapping > Gradient Texture > ColorRamp > Diffuse >* Material Output. Then play with the Mapping Location value to move the colors. file here:


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In Blender 2.8, there is an attribute "Random Per Island" in the geometry input. It only works with Cycles though (not Eevee nor the material preview). It does the job!


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I think the basic node organization for glass is a mix between Glass and Transparency. The more your mix will tend to Transparency (Mix Shader value) the less it will be reflective. The Glass Roughness will make the glass more polished. You can mix that with a Glossy Shader with a Layer Weight as factor if you want to add reflectivity on the normals for ...


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Create a half circle by attaching a colorramp to a spherical gradient and removing the bottom half greater than math. Make these nodes into a group. CtrlG Create a square by clamping X and Y coordinates to [-1, 1] Rotate the items with vector math operations or mapping nodes. Squash the square into a rectangle and place it in the center. Use the half ...


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Textures turn magenta when the shader fails to locate the image texture assigned to it. Double check the image paths for the rock and sand diffuse textures in the node tree. Reopen the images if it need be. Hope it helps!


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You can have anti-aliasing and transparency and use only nodes, but that won't be a small node tree. Original image, linear interpolation closest interpolation, background removed similar way as other answers linear interpolation, otherwise same node network as 2. monster node network emulating linear interpolation, screenshot would be unusable, check ...


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You can use a "Mix RGB" node set to "Subtract" and invert the resulting mask to get your alpha value. Note : "Compare" node is a "Math" node with the operation set to "Compare" Result : You can tweak the third input of the compare node if your magenta isnt pure, to add a threshold. This will also progressively get rid of colors that are closer to the ...


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You could simply push the contrast of your image with a ColorRamp and use this as a mask between the original and a Transparent node. As suggested by Jachym Michal, when using Principled BSDF, just plug the ColorRamp into the Alpha input.


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Pure purple should be RGB(1,0,1) so you can make a mask with Math node, Greater Than operation. Red value should be greater than some threshold value and blue value should be greater than some threshold as well so they should be multiplied: In this particular case you probably do not want to use anti-aliasing since it will not work well with this technique, ...


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