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1

I am not sure, but i think you clamped the light too much. I got this: if i increase your clamping (clamping direct and indirect light) from 0.03 to 0.2


1

Those pictures are often in multiple exposures of different ligths and then assembled in photoshop to take "the best" parts. In Blender take planar lights and map them with proper hdr textures of real softboxes, then place planar lights left and right. You will still need to adjust areas in postprocess to remove things that are unwanted. Here is my ...


2

Maybe try adding a HDRI for your lighting/reflections. Go to the World section of your shading tab and add an Environment Texture (not an Image Texture). Blender has some HDRI's at ...2.91/datafiles/studiolights/world. You can also find plenty more for free online. One of the most popular places is HDRI Haven (https://hdrihaven.com/hdris/):


0

In eevee go to your volumetrics tab and crank up samples and light clamp. BEFORE: AFTER:


1

I just need to uncheck "ambient occlusion". It was making everything way too bright, even with low values.


0

If you started to make a scene, and always used eevee to do your renders, it will probably look like that. There are meny differences with Eevee and Cycles. I think making the background a little darker might work, and you might have to tweak some settings to make it look right. Eevee isn't bad, I think your render looks just fine in Eevee!


13

To desaturate objects closer to a light, add 4 nodes to your object's material: Texture coordinate > Object: target your light Vector Math > Length - gives lower value for objects closer to that light Math > Multiply - to control the falloff Hue/Saturation node, to control the saturation (You can wrap the setup in a nodegroup and put inside every ...


1

This could be happening because there is no geometry to block the light. At 12AM, the sun is below the horizon, so the Earth should cast a large shadow on the city. In your case, however, there is no geometry to block this light, and so the sun is able to shine on your tower from below. You could create a huge plane at z=0 to emulate the Earth's shadow. ...


3

The default color for the world is a light gray. Think of it like a giant sphere that surrounds the scene that is emitting light. To make the world black, change the color, or disconnect any nodes to the surface of the world, or bring the Strength to $0$


1

You don't need to put it as a plane, you can just import it as a background. You might have the background as alpha, if you do, turn it off.


3

Mix your Image texture (through a shader - emission is possible) with a Transparent Shader, using your images' alpha as a mix factor. As you can see in the image bleow, there are no lights in the scene. It works in both cycles and EEVEE, but keep in mind, in Cycles it will actually emit light without further modification to the shader. If using EEVEE, ...


2

Yes it is possible, you just assign a material with emission shader to the faces that you want to emit light and they will(in Cycles render).


2

this parameter should have been set to 0


4

You need to plug the texture color into the height, and not the normal input of the displacement node. You can play with the scale field if the displacement seems too high.


2

The normals of your faces are pointing in opposite directions, possibly due to a scale by -1 ? AltN > Recalculate Normals (outside) fixes that.


0

found out i could do this with baked lighting: in viewport shading dropdown settings have "Scene World" enabled; Properties - Render - Indirect Lighting - Bake Indirect Lighting; slightly inconvenient as it requires rebaking if changes to the background are made. otherwise works fine - i was expecting the baked lighting to break when objects gets ...


0

Okay, got I myself. Didn't changed my render engine from Eevee to Cycles.. So much better :)


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