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Object Constraint Follow Path for Camera Object Constraint Copy Z Rotation for Camera.001 Object Constraint Copy Location for Mesh objects in negative Bright orange Camera is active for rendering. Camera on path can be any object. Mesh Objects are parented to Empty.


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Select all objects except the camera, making sure to select the plain last. Then parent all objects (except camera) to the plain. Now you only have to move the plain and everything else will move along with it except the camera which will remain at the origin. NB I say to connect to the plain as this is visually obvious, however you could connect ...


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Select the mesh and press the period key on the Numpad.


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You appear zoomed-in. Even though you have selected the camera view, it will retain the last zoom selected. Each workspace will retain it's own zoom levels. Just zoom out and hopefully that will resolve it. Oh and turn off Lock Camera To View as this sometimes confuses things. Once re-orientated, you can turn it back on.


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Sounds like you're on the right track! Depending on how much detail you need to fix, Blender's UV Texture Paint can save some time between Blender and Photoshop. This tutorial goes in-depth about projecting and fixing parts of an image and provides a decent workflow.


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The animated path has a parameter called "Evaluation Time". This shows in percents where is the constrained object along the path. When you click on "Animate Path" button (at the constraints menu, you already did it) the curve gets an animation modifier what you can find in the graph editor. After you delete it, you can animate the Evaluation time as any ...


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bmesh script. Add sphere, remove only faces with bmesh in object mode import bpy import bmesh context = bpy.context bpy.ops.mesh.primitive_uv_sphere_add() ob = context.object me = ob.data bm = bmesh.new() bm.from_mesh(me) bmesh.ops.delete(bm, geom=bm.faces, context='FACES_ONLY') bm.to_mesh(me) me.update()


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Turns out this is simply a viewport issue in the rendering its perfectly translucent with the image visible.


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Your rendered video will always be rectangular. But you can add a mask over it, using the compositor Create a black and white image using Blender/Photoshop/whatever Add an RGB node, using the Mix node Connect your BW image into the FAC input How to connect a mask in compositor. The RGB node changes the background color.


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The problem was that you set the Plane as a local camera here. So every time you pressed 0 key it, blender showed you the local camera set as the plane and thus you were seeing the inside of the washing machine. Just deselect the "Use Local Camera" checkbox, that would allow you to change the Local Camera. Select the camera of you scene using the eye ...


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As @Gorgious has commented, it sounds like an off-by-one error? For a quick, even, 50-frame loop of a rotation, for example, without going into the Graph Editor and using features like Extrapolation or Cycling, you could: Set a key at frame 1 of 0 degrees Set a key at frame 51 of 360 or -360 degrees, depending on the desired direction of rotation In the ...


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I'm not sure how you can do it with the standard tools, but I figured out a way using animation nodes that seems to work (someone might need to check my math). I basically created a subprogram that takes a Spline input and an object input(what will move along the spline). Then using some math, it takes the spline length, number of frames in the scene and a ...


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You could try adjusting the origin point of the camera such that it will curve at the point you want it to. Note: This only works if the camera doesn't need to be moved along another curve-path.


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This solution uses only 1 driver, to drive the y value of the camera's transform depending on its focal length. I used a linear regression calculator online (Search "Linear regression calculator" on your favorite search engine) and I mapped a few values of the focal length and the resulting y value necessary to keep more or less the same objects in frame. ...


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If the problem is after changing camera mode to orthographic from perspective the camera stops scaling, adjust the orthographic scale


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Few things come to mind: You may have pressed / and entered local view. This will allow you to only view (in the viewport) the objects you had selected when you pressed the key. This does not affect renders or the hidden/shown state of objects. If you've hidden the objects by pressing the "eye" icon, you've only hidden the objects from the viewport. If you ...


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Select the objects and keep camera as the active object, then press Ctrl + P to do parenting.


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Parenting the camera to the object will solve this problem. You can do this by selecting the camera first, and then selecting the object you want to parent it to. You can parent by pressing CtrlP, and then selecting object (keep transform). This should fix the problem.


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Cameras in Blender are made to resemble cameras in real world. The size of the sensor is important when you need to match content created with a real camera with your CG, and that happens really often. Obviously, you might have a hard time to match your camera if you don't enter the correct sensor size. You should search for it online for the specific camera ...


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You can change the Aspect X under Scene->Dimensions to account for the 45 degree camera rotation. When testing, I found that $\sqrt{2} \approx 1.4142$ worked to create perfect squares given your constraints. This way you don't have to modify your actual geometry, just the final output image. Here is an example render where I overlayed checker patterns ...


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You can make each wall as a separate object. Then just disable/enable them in the Viewport and Render Use the toggles for Viewport/Render visibility I know this is such a basic answer... but I've already built the walls...


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import bpy context = bpy.context scene = context.scene active_camera = scene.camera if active_camera: print(active_camera.name) else: print("No Active Camera Selected")


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Not sure what you want the name to display. If you print the object of camera, python will treat it as an object and print the structure by default. You can retrieve the name(class <str>) properties inside the camera object, which is the name of the object in outliner panel. print(activecamera.name) should display the desired thing. In 1 line: ...


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In order to get an exact isometric perspective you shoud actually set as folllows: Here's a comparison between (60,0,45) and (54.736,0,45) rotation: Thanks to blender3darchitect.com: How to create a true isometric camera for architecture?


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The problem, as was in my case, is that you cannot do cam.keyframe_insert(data_path = 'lens', frame = (timeline_frame)) if cam is an object, you have to take reference of the camera type, not the object, because the action regarding to lens animation is assigned to a camera type not object type. bpy.data.objects["objectID"].keyframe_insert("lens") #...


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Inside the properties for the camera is a value for Focal Length If you hover over the value and hit 'I' on your keyboard, you will create a keyframe for that value - at that frame.


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I found solution. Locked Tracking to Empty moved along object Y angle.


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Frame change handler and track to constraint. As commented, another way to do this would be to Set up a track to constraint camera to object. Tracking the point of view, its negative z axis, y axis up, to the object of interest. Use a frame change handler to set the random camera location. The scene is passed as argument to handler. The rendering camera ...


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So.. I don't know why, but the solution that worked for me was to split the keyframe assignment into two separate loops. Investigations made it appear as though the 'camera look' function just wasn't being called.. "in time?" I'm not sure. Working code below. for i in range(10): bpy.context.scene.frame_set(i) x, y, z = randint(6,15), randint(-6,16), ...


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