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In some way, you can do this with: 3D Viewport ‣ View ‣ Viewport Render Image More info: https://docs.blender.org/manual/en/latest/editors/3dview/viewport_render.html


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I guess @vklidu has already explained everything, but since my linked answer to a different question was maybe misunderstable I tired a visualization of the relations between image size, focal length, sensor size and the FOV to answer one part of your question: Why does reducing Resolution X increase my camera's FOV and increasing it reduce FOV? (The ...


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In short If you set Focal Lenght and Sensor Size values matching your real-cam ... it should work. Those two values represent perspective (optics) behaviour, including FOV (sure without lens distortions and other optics defects). Dimension values (Resolution X/Y in px) are as naming states - about rendered dimension, that can be set as cropped or extended ...


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You have an object just named “Cube” that is hidden in viewports, but not in renders: This object obscures the camera: Either delete the object or disable it for renders as well, and your problem will be resolved.


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In Eevee, volumetrics are approximated by combining a number of 'slices' of the volume together. While being much more efficient than rendering the complete volume, the accuracy is very dependent on the number of 'slices' used and how those are spread through the view. You are seeing artifacts resulting from those 'slices' being in a different position for ...


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Keep context object centered on largest viewport in screen. The view is set up similarly to the camera, ie it looks down its $-Z$ axis. Rotate an object to camera view Access view orientation from python? whereas meshes are normally $Z$ up $-Y$ forward. The view_align method below, looks for the largest 3d view, then using its matrix aligns the context ...


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Please press ⌥ Alt + H to unhide, or check if you accidentally moved it into another layer, or switch between object and edit modes.


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Top view for camera has no translation or rotation. See. Align camera to view precisely and automatically, without manual fiddling How to convert current view as camera? Oops, realized after making gif q asked for perspective rather than ortho. ie don't change to ortho, however ortho is IMO may be a better way to make text look 2D. In the cameras property ...


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If you just want the line of sight of the camera, (regardless of where the sphere is in the view,) this will do it: But, of course, the colors will go black when the line of sight goes negative. You may want to map the -1 to 1 range in each dimension to something more to your liking.


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Use a camera data/view vector node. Because this provides a camera space vector, you can use a vector transform node to transform it into a world space vector like you want. The "camera" being referred to here is not the camera I have in the scene-- notice the axes and camera position, notice that the same sphere is different colors in different ...


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Script version. import bpy from bpy import context scene = context.scene cam = scene.camera mw = cam.matrix_world f = 1 if cam.type == 'ORTHO' else cam.data.display_size corners = [mw @ (f * p) for p in cam.data.view_frame(scene=scene)] ''' # add empties at corners for i, p in enumerate(corners): bpy.ops.object.empty_add(location=p) context....


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In case anyone have a similar problem, I 'kinda' solved the problem using ray-cast. I basically created a for loop that generates ray-casts coming from the camera with destination to the 4 vertices that frame the jersey number. I have to perform this calculation for every object that I think might be between the camera and the body. With this approach I don'...


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I don't know anything about coding... but right-clicking on the Size value under Viewport Display and choosing "Copy Data Path" tells me the value is called display_size. Maybe this helps; I don't know how to address this in python. Anyway, from this value you can calculate the viewport camera dimensions according to these rules (if the camera ...


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This sounds like it would be solved with the "Show Active" action. You can select the object you want to zoom into and execute the "Show Active" command. To use Show Active, hit full stop (.) on the number pad. Since you're on a Macbook and probably don't have a number pad, you should make sure you have "emulate numpad" selected ...


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Under Preferences -> Keymap search for Fly Mode and click in the Field where it Says Shift' and rebind it to whatever you like to press. call me oldscool... but for me Shift F for Flymode .. like it used to be works great


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Found more specifications at https://www.gsmarena.com/apple_iphone_11-9848.php The focal length for a wide video is 26mm, 1/2.55 sensor width and pixel size 1.4nm. I have found: https://www.vision-doctor.com/en/camera-calculations/sensor-diagonal-sensor-ratio.html. I simply put in the video's pixel width and height (3840 x 2160) and the pixel size (1.4nm). ...


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The trick is to select the curve then in Object data properties change the Twist Method from Minimal to Z-Up (screenshot). Thanks to Christopher Bennet for posting the response here.


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You can enable or disable the Depth of Field in Viewport Shading by going into the Viewport Shading settings. Click on the down facing arrow button on the right of all the shading styles in the top right of the screen. The Depth Of Field settings is at the bottom of the settings.


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Path-following Camera - Use a cube, either visible or invisible as the path object. Add a line between two diagonally opposed corner vertices and subdivide that. Set the cube's Origin point to that. (with SH-S) (Shouldn't be necessary, but... ) Parent the camera to that vertice ONLY. Select the cube, then the camera, go into Edit mode and select the ...


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the script automatically creates the directories with your cams names. If it is already there, the script just puts the animated pics in these folders. check this out: import bpy import os scene = bpy.context.scene oldPath = bpy.context.scene.render.filepath for ob in scene.objects: if ob.type == 'CAMERA': bpy.context.scene.camera = ob ...


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