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You could use bevel: Select a ring of edge loops with CtrlAlt right click. Select the edge loops with the Select > Edge Loops function. Bevel with CtrlB. Keep it as it is or extrude with AltE > Region. Give the faces the material you want.


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-Loop select horizontal line -Select similar (shift + G) > direction -Delete edges -Add modifier > Skin -Select all edges > Ctrl + A to resize the thickness of skin (optional) -add subdivision modifier to smooth things out


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This question is far too broad to be reasonably answered in it's current state, but rather than flagging it closed, perhaps the following information is useful. Please take the time to edit your question accordingly. You will likely have more problems going from Cycles to Eevee rather than the other way round. If you are having a more specific problem ...


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Its a matter of taste and the use you want to make out of it. EEVEE is the super fast render engine, at the cost of less precise light shading. If you want to have accurate refractions and reflections, CYCLES is the best because it is a ray trace engine. Meaning, it will calculate lights according to true laws of physics (ray trace means that every "photon"...


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Hmmmm, as far as I understand, the real thing does not have a solid 1/0 boundary between the liquid and the solid part all surfaces have a lot of microbumps. So what I can think of here is that you can try taking two different levels of noise textures, and using the one with larger scale value for the solid part and the one with the smaller scale for the ...


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I found a combination of other user's code with some debugging to get a working solution for now. #Import python import bpy from bpy import context, data, ops mat = bpy.data.materials.new(name="New_Mat") mat.use_nodes = True bsdf = mat.node_tree.nodes["Principled BSDF"] texImage = mat.node_tree.nodes.new('ShaderNodeTexImage') texImage.image = bpy.data....


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You can transfer any kind of data (float, integer, negative, greater than 1, etc.) from Animation Nodes to Shader (Material) with the help of UV Map Data Output node or Set Vertex Colors node but for this, you need Animation Nodes + Extra Nodes. Method-1: First, we have to find the total number of vertices for individual polygons using the Mesh Object Input ...


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In the Shader Editor you can create some keyframes on a Mix Shader. Plug 2 colors into the sockets of a Mix Shader. at frame 1 put the Mix Shader factor at 0, put your mouse cursor over it and press i to create your first keyframe, the value becomes green, it means it has saved the value, it will also create a yellow dot in the Dopesheet. Then at frame 20 ...


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I did something like what Mr. Ramos did, (though I'm not as good as him). However, I thought that perhaps seeing what this creates in the Graph Editor would help you. As you can see, Red, Green, Blue, as well as Alpha keys are created, and each can be changed at any frame, creating a new key frame.


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Hover the the Object Color property in the properties window and press I


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You can work with the Hue/Saturation node only. If you want yellow, as yellow is a bright brown color, you need to find the right Hue (0.35 seems good) and push the Saturation and Value pretty hight (2 and 10 here).


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With rgb curves. The colors are not right yet, but do have the intense color. You can see the difference with the image in the question with hue/saturation.


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Best way would be to create a texture, sculpting it is not the way to go in my opinion. I've actually done similar things in C4D for Matthew Stone (look him up). We would shoot real paint on camera on a white background, get rid of the background in photoshop and just assign it to a plane. Then you can do whatever you want with the plane, twist it and move ...


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