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For some reason whenever I extrude a plane face and try to delete the newly made face it doesn't actually delete. The extruded face deletes as expected when using a cube, but not a plane.

Video showing what I mean: https://i.stack.imgur.com/xMfTg.jpg

You see when I extrude the face on the cube, shrink it, and then delete it the face actually disappears. This is normal. However, when extrude the face of a place, shrink it, and then delete it the face does disappear, however, the original plane face doesn't as if it wasn't effected by the extruding. It's as if Blender is duplicating the plane before extruding it. So when I delete the face expecting to see a hole where the face use to be I instead just see the plane I was originally started with.

I've been using blender for a while now, however, I don't remember the extrusion behaving this way for planes. Any ideas?

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    $\begingroup$ Hello and welcome. While files, images, and external videos or links may be helpful additions they should not be the only way to obtain information about your issue. Don't make understanding your question rely on downloading a file, watching a video or visiting an external site. Use the builtin tools to upload images or gifs, along with thoroughly explaining the problem in written form so it can be indexed and searched for thus helping future visitors with similar issues. $\endgroup$ Aug 5, 2022 at 8:33
  • $\begingroup$ Understood. Sorry. $\endgroup$
    – NewGuy95
    Aug 5, 2022 at 19:11

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Spotted! :) It does seem that if E face-extrusion finds itself asked to extrude a region whose perimeter is entirely made up of boundary edges, it will leave the original geometry in place. Otherwise, it won't.

That behaviour is so desirable, in the normal course of modelling, for the creation of manifold meshes starting from bounded regions, that personally I hadn't even noticed it. Despite being strictly inconsistent, it looks like an 'executive decision', rather than a bug.

For single faces, to obtain a bottomless extrusion, you have AltE > 'Individual'.

For multi-face regions, you have I inset, by 0 'Width' if wanted, and an adjustable 'Depth'.

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    $\begingroup$ I agree. Using E > S means that the original plane is effectively being duplicated and then scaled inwards as you can see by the z-fighting in the video. Deleting the scaled face leaves the original in place. $\endgroup$
    – John Eason
    Aug 5, 2022 at 9:07
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    $\begingroup$ Ah, thanks! I appreciate the answers. $\endgroup$
    – NewGuy95
    Aug 5, 2022 at 18:55

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