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Can someone please explain Dyntopo in Sculpting beacuse so far it's kinda hard to understand: -Which Detail Refine Method to use and when -Which Detail Type Method to use and when -How many pixel details to put and when Also,WHY to use that specific refine/type method in that specific situation I did some research but I either couldn't find what I was looking for or even when I did I couldn't fully understand it

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    $\begingroup$ This is the best tutorial on DynTopo. $\endgroup$ – Mentalist Mar 28 '16 at 23:57
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    $\begingroup$ Some things just need time spent playing with them to get a good feel for yourself. Remember (especially in sculpting) this is an artist's tool! $\endgroup$ – Rick Riggs Mar 29 '16 at 0:23
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Hi eiipaw well the way to simplify why dynotopo is the way it's is all about the quality of the detail plus their is a limitation for what your current geometry can and cant do.

So without dynotopo you are just using the current geometry of your mesh and moving it around to create detail, this can cause serious artifacts and distortion if you plan on baking normals, Dynotopo for the contrary it adds small polygons by extraction or addition, so it adds more topology to your mesh instead of only moving it around. enter image description here

That detail was done by dynameshing the anvil, I would have never being able to create that sharp detail without dynameshing, So i would said rule of thumb if your model is not that detail, and only moving around the geometry gets you the detail that you want; go for regular sculpting is easy and less taxing to your computer, but if you are doing like ultra detail crevices or damage with some grunge. Or a character with a lot of detail like a porous skin, go for dynamesh. You can also simulate detail by painting directly on a model. That's what blizzard does, although they use sculpting to bake on normals for specific things. Just look at blizzard atist portfolios sometimes they show you the maps that they used.

Finally remember that if you use sculpting detail on a mesh, think what is the purpose of your model, if your model is for games or animation you want to bake the normals (you dont want to have millions of polis on an engine or huge render times to render a scene). For the pixel size think about how close is that object or character in realation to the camera. And experiment experiment, Experiment!

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  • $\begingroup$ It's not clear what "dynamesh" is mentioned here; if Dynamesh from ZBrush then the second to last paragraph makes little sense. There are different ways to create highly detailed geometry; both dynamic topology and regular sculpting with Multires modifier in Blender will give the same result in the end. They just need to be used properly, without increasing details too soon. $\endgroup$ – Mr Zak Jan 8 at 16:36

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