2
$\begingroup$

This must be very easy, but can't find it anywhere. I am trying to create a planar grid of vertices to specification (i.e. I want to say the size of the plane and how many vertices in X direction and how many in Y or Z direction). It would also be okay to start with a quad face.

I found very clunky ways of doing it, including subdividing faces or edges followed by grid fill, but they are very inconvenient in the sense that you can only do easily grids that have a power of two number of vertices. I want to be able to specify non-power of two dimensions (i.e. 1440 x 500), which is extremely tedious to achieve by subdivision.

Is there an easier way to achieve this without having to create the geometry by hand? Ideally I would like to avoid scripting.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ for a 1440x500 division, you could try some array modifiers. $\endgroup$ – Bithur Sep 19 '16 at 10:55
3
$\begingroup$

Ok, as I expected, it is actually trivial. In blender >= 2.77:

Add > Grid

You can then specify the number of subdivisions and the radius of the grid as options.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ The problem with grid is that it makes only square planes. $\endgroup$ – Bithur Sep 19 '16 at 11:03
  • $\begingroup$ @Bithur that is correct. Fortunately that is enough for my case. It would be great to have a general answer that would work for any starting morphology though. Grid fill is supposed to take care of this, but you have to subdivide the line loop first, which can be annoying. $\endgroup$ – glopes Sep 19 '16 at 11:07
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ if you need that for heightmaps, you should try the new displacement and dynamic subsurf in 2.78 $\endgroup$ – Bithur Sep 19 '16 at 11:13
  • $\begingroup$ To make it a circle you could use loop tools $\endgroup$ – Unnamed Sentient Being Sep 19 '16 at 14:08
2
$\begingroup$

Why not using modifiers? Two arrays will do. This way you're free to define size and proportion of one cell, and have them replicated as many times as you like. Just make sure to check the Merge Option in the modifiers, and use relative offsets:

modifier stack

Apply both modifiers to proceed if you need to tweak the mesh later manually.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

Can't you do it with 2 subdivide edges? First select 2 parallel edges, both along the X axis for example, then subdivide them to get the number you want. Then Select all the Y axis edges and subdivide them to get the number you want. Sure it takes 2 steps, but neither is hard.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.