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I have a mesh that has some vertices between edges that do not need to be there. How can I easily remove these vertices without selecting them manually? I tired using limited dissolve but that get rid of anything that coplanar not just the floating vertices.

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ Think about it from an algorithmic perspective: how should Blender know which vertices "do not need to be there?" The only vertices that don't contribute to the geometry (besides vertices not connected to any edges) are indeed coplanar, so Limited Dissolve is probably the closest you'll get. In terms of actually achieving this particular result: as this looks like a circle, you could use circle select C in edit mode to select all the vertices in that ring, then deselect all the ones in a slightly smaller ring to be left with only those selected. $\endgroup$ – wchargin Oct 9 '13 at 13:29
  • $\begingroup$ This isn't an answer to your question, but it is related. Ctrl+Alt+Shift+M selects Non-manifold geometry. $\endgroup$ – gandalf3 Oct 9 '13 at 16:44
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In some instances, depending on topology, the following can work:

  1. Select one of the vertices that you want to remove.

    enter image description here
  2. Choose Select> Similar> Amount of Connecting Edges from the 3D view header.

    enter image description here
  3. Deselect any vertices that have been selected but that you don't want to delete (in this case, the corners) and choose Mesh> Delete> Dissolve Vertices to delete the unwanted vertices.

    enter image description here
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  • $\begingroup$ PS: manifolds can ignore the 3rd step. $\endgroup$ – Leon Cheung Sep 19 '14 at 3:18
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The most efficient I guess would be to try and avoid them if you are trying to remove edge loops use delete Edge Loop you will avoid this problem as it deletes Edges and Vertices.

Note it isn't perfect and may create extraneous edges but select them and repeat the process usual only needed once.

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Although you didn't specify how you came to have those loose vertices, it is common to get that situation when using 'dissolve edges' to remove edges from your geometry without leaving holes. When you use 'dissolve edges', the vertices that were part of the edges will not be deleted with the edges, however, they will remain selected. You can then just press delete and select 'dissolve vertices' to get rid of them too.

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  • $\begingroup$ if you select a lot of vertices on an object that has a lot of faces, then the vertices will collapse and you will almost certainly be left with a very deformed object if you follow this method -- but, if you can get select the vertices (which is the difficult part), then you can absolutely use dissolve vertices. It's just that when you have thousands or millons of points, sometimes it's difficult to select the vertices that you want to dissolve. $\endgroup$ – dylnmc Nov 24 '16 at 0:59

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