0
$\begingroup$

I've been doing some visualisation exercises and I had this question. I want to recreate

this shape.

I planned to do this by creating a 1x1 cube and then cloning it using the array modifier, but I am not sure how to correctly use this tool.

count is 4 and -1 is the relative offset in y direction

After this, if I try to add another array modifier, it overrides the previous parameters.

I did not apply the modifier yet.

$\endgroup$
2
$\begingroup$

The array modifier takes whatever is above it in the modifier stack and creates duplicates based on the offset(s) you choose: constant, relative or object based (or a combo of all three). These arrays are additive with the arrays below in the modifier stack. That means if you have 1 unit cube with a relative offset of 1 on X and a count of 3 followed by a second array with a relative offset of 1 on Y with a count of 3, you will end up with a 3x3x1 rectangle lying flat on the X-Y plane.

One way to do what you want to do is extrude faces instead of arraying the cube. You can then use a textures to get the visualization you want. Like this:

enter image description here

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
4
$\begingroup$

You could do this using arrays, because they can be given Start and End Caps which can, themselves, be arrays. But you would be creating a lot of work for yourself.

when you put a second Array modifier on an object, it doesn't override the previous parameters; it generates an array with the entire previous array as its elements.

You might be better off using a different duplication method - perhaps Vertex Instancing:

enter image description here

.. using a simple framework of vertices. Every time you E(XY or Z) extrude a new vertex, a cube will be instanced on it.

enter image description here

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ These are really interesting ideas. I wasn't aware of vertex instancing at all! $\endgroup$ – Electric_Wizard Feb 8 at 21:46
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @Electric_Wizard I think yours is better for contiguous cubes.. :) $\endgroup$ – Robin Betts Feb 8 at 21:49

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.