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I am looking to create a sort of "flag", a plane with some cuts that are creating sort of "leaves" and I need to open these apertures with turbulence or wind.

Basically I need to recreate the same thing that is happening when you take a piece of paper and made a lot of cuts inside. When you will blow behind these little parts will open showing the hole of the paper

I tried with a particels system and vertex group. I created a surface with the holes and in a separated object, I have several "leaves" grouped with different vertex groups. The static render is nice but for animation is absolutely not realistic and super heavy. enter image description here

Is there any good way to approach this animation? After I should shrinkwrap the entire thing on a curved surface that will be hidden. Any suggestion?

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  • $\begingroup$ You could try a cloth simulation and a wind force field. Pin the vertices that should be static $\endgroup$ – susu Jun 13 '20 at 22:32
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you, I solved it! I watched some tutorials about flags, flying plastic bag and posters from IanHubert YouTube channel and I found a solution. I made a plane as a piece of fabric, cut some faces and pinned all the vertex. Then I created the small faces with the same dimension of holes and let free to move with a wind force. Then playing with subdivision surfaces, boolean division and simply deform I get the right surface and shape of this "sail". Thanks a lot! You saved me for my exam ahah $\endgroup$ – Nazcafox Jun 14 '20 at 12:55
  • $\begingroup$ Please write your solution as a proper answer, not as a comment. Other users might find it useful. Save others for their exams... $\endgroup$ – susu Jun 14 '20 at 15:46
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SOLVED: I watched some tutorials about flags, flying plastic bags and posters from IanHubert YouTube channel and I found the solution. I made a plane as a piece of fabric, cut some faces and pinned all the vertex. Then I created the small faces with the same dimension of holes and let free to move with a wind force. Then playing with subdivision surfaces, boolean division and simply deform I get the right surface and shape of this "sail".

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