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I'm new to blender and still trying to get to grips with some of the basics.

I've duplicated a section from one corner of my model and I'm now trying to attach a copy to the other 3 corners. The problem is I'm struggling to line up the edges perfectly and merge them. I don't want to use bridge or anything which adds additional faces/edges etc, I just want to merge the two existing edges into one to keep it the same dimensions as the original part I duplicated.

Is there an easy way to align these edges, move them together and merge/remove duplicate vertices?

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ this can be want you want : blender.stackexchange.com/questions/58022/… $\endgroup$ – lemon Aug 14 '16 at 17:23
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks, that's great. My main problem is not knowing what to search for. Now that I know to search for snapping I found videos etc in seconds. I was searching for aligning and merging. $\endgroup$ – Daniel Aug 14 '16 at 17:34
  • $\begingroup$ The trick is using the empty ! $\endgroup$ – lemon Aug 14 '16 at 17:37
  • $\begingroup$ I'm not sure what you mean. $\endgroup$ – Daniel Aug 14 '16 at 17:41
  • $\begingroup$ The empty allows to choose which vertex will be moved to which target... but if you don't need it, never mind ! $\endgroup$ – lemon Aug 14 '16 at 17:42
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You can use the snap to vertex functions, with the mode set to 'active', like this:

overview

The first button marked with a red arrow activates snapping (however, you can use the Ctrl key as a much faster alternative. The second one allows you to set the snapping target, in this case vertices. The third one tells Blender to try to snap the selection based on the last selected vertex, the so-called active vertex (red circle). You can identify it by its color, in my theme white as opposed to orange.

Now, activate grab and move G and move the selection towards the target point. When you're somewhat close, the mesh should snap there entirely. Use 'remove doubles' from the 'Tools' Panel to eliminate overlapping vertices.

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