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I have a complex grid of points in sort of an elliptical orientation. I would like to make a 2D quad mesh such that each point is in the center of a quad.

I had been trying to accomplish this programmatically with some difficulty, then I though maybe this functionality is already implemented in Blender.

Is there some way that I can generate such a mesh given such a set of points with Blender?

EDIT

Here are a few images to better show what I am trying to do. The given points are in blue. I want to surround each point with a quad and have minimal gaps between them.

enter image description here

enter image description here

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Use Dupli verts:

  • 1st mesh with center vertices, under Properties > Object > Duplication switch Verts:

    enter image description here

  • 2nd mesh a simple quad (add plane) and parent it under 1st mesh:

    enter image description here

  • if you want to convert it to editable mesh, do it with Shift+Ctrl+A

Edit: To rotate them like in your picture, connect your points with edges so they form concentric ellipses. Extrude them so you have some polygons - this will give those verts proper normals:

enter image description here

Check the rotation in that Duplication tab and convert to geometry, delete the original plane, concentric ellipses and delete the bottom dupli-objects:

enter image description here

The spacing is determined by the position of your input vertices so this should end up in what you want..

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  • $\begingroup$ But then how do transform the quads so that they are connected seamlessly? $\endgroup$ – MVTC Feb 1 '15 at 18:47
  • $\begingroup$ @MVTC Well how do you want them to connect? Can you post example finished part of the mesh? Hand-drawn maybe? If the mesh will be too specific you would probably need to generate it with python. $\endgroup$ – Jaroslav Jerryno Novotny Feb 1 '15 at 21:15
  • $\begingroup$ Maybe what I want can't be done that easily. Right now, I am generated the images I've shown. But you can see that some gaps are larger than others. I am defining the quads by 4 polar coordinates. If I increase r or theta for all of them, then some will overlap. Imagine that each quad had some internal force, trying to expand itself, and when two edges meet, the push against each-other and deform each-other a little as to be in full solid contact. $\endgroup$ – MVTC Feb 2 '15 at 3:27
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    $\begingroup$ @MVTC So you want non-orthogonal quads? Some Voronoi type of thing? That changes all, I had a wrong impression. I'll try to think of something, fracturize a plane with particles in your center points - the center points will need to be at very specific positions for the voronoi cells to have 4 sides.. $\endgroup$ – Jaroslav Jerryno Novotny Feb 2 '15 at 9:17

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