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Lets say that I have a front image and a side image of a person, taken from different camera distances.

What would be the correct workflow to use these two images as modeling references, in the sense of adjusting the front and side views accordingly so that they match with each other?

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Front/side views not matching up perfectly with each other happens more often than you'd think. As for your question...

Assuming that the object in both references are the same proportion-wise, and the only noticeable difference is the distance of the camera, then its a simple matter of scaling one image to the approximate size of the model that you want, then using that same image as a base, you scale the other images to match. As far as I'm aware, there isn't a standard workflow for this (although anyone is free to correct me), but some things to keep in mind:

  • When scaling, be sure to scale your references evenly, and not one axis at a time. You should only do that if your reference images themselves are stretched out of proportion for some reason
  • After scaling all of your images, cross reference each other using different points of interest on your object. For example, if your two images are a front/side view of a face, the nose or ear can typically be seen from both views, which you can use to compare. On something like a car, the side view mirrors could be used for this. Just be sure you're not relying on a single point of interest to compare multiple images
  • If you have a reference image selected, a special tab just for images will appear in your properties editor which you may find useful, especially the "Opacity" setting if you need to overlay images over each other.
    enter image description here
  • Depending on how your reference images were taken, they may not line up properly, no matter how much you resize them, and there are a number of reasons for this (different camera lenses, user error, etc). In cases like these, it's okay to go for the best estimate. They're only reference images, after all.
  • ^ If you're not confident even after doing your best in lining up the objects, do a rough block-out to check, focusing on proportions. If you've blocked-out your model according to your reference images, and the proportions all look good, then it's probably good. If you're STILL not sure, you can perhaps ask someone else for a second opinion.
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