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I have blender version 2.76b. I have noticed that blender doesn't update it self automatically. Is there a reason for that. And also if i update my blender, will I be able to work on blender projects from previous version of blender without any errors or problems? Thanks

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You have to download the updated version from the website because there is not an in-software update function. And yes you will be able to edit old .blend files because it is a standard file extension in the whole blender suite.

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  • $\begingroup$ Yeah not a problem man $\endgroup$ – Noah May 6 '16 at 11:50
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Blender as no builtin automatic update system at the moment, you always have to download and manually install new versions.

They are for the most part backwards compatible except for major versions like the jump between 2.49 to the 2.5 series, or between 2.79 and the 2.8 series. Apart from some small additions or changes you should always be able to open your files without problems on newer versions unless stated in the release notes.

If there is no particular functionality from the dropped features list you specifically need, and if your hardware is compatible with newer versions, it is always advised to upgrade, unless you are in the middle of some critical project, commercial production work, or a complex scene, in which case you are advised to finish your work before messing with the software installation.

New versions can bring bugs and introduced regressions or some time have issues with newer driver and hardware.

If you want something close to an auto update system you can try the Steam version of Blender.

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    $\begingroup$ If you installed the steam version of blender, it should update automatically, shouldn't it? $\endgroup$ – Luka ash May 6 '16 at 2:26
  • $\begingroup$ Hum, good point, didn't think of that one. Not sure how the Steam version of Blender works though, it probably does auto update, although I am not sure if it prompts the user before or not. $\endgroup$ – Duarte Farrajota Ramos May 6 '16 at 2:57
  • $\begingroup$ In Blender Conference 2015, Ton Rosendall said that version 2.8 will probably have few compatibility issues with older 2.7 versions, concerning some Modifiers or other operations, till then, there should be no compatibility issues in between various versions. $\endgroup$ – Georges May 6 '16 at 15:55
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, 2.8 is considered a major version jump, and breaking some degree of backwards compatibility is allowed, still it will be able to open previous version files mostly problem free. Some parts will require updating or remaking though. $\endgroup$ – Duarte Farrajota Ramos May 6 '16 at 18:02
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As far as I can tell, people are enjoying 2.77 more than 2.76b. You'll be able work on your previous projects without any problems. An automatic update option would require Blender contacting the server prior to starting, which would increase the time Blender takes when starting up (some computers already struggle with start-up time, as Blender is a dense program with lots of functionality written with a simple language), especially if it struggles in contacting the server. And if it does find there's an update, artists may feel pressured to postpone their work while it updates, or while they try and figure out the new features. Not to mention the annoying reminders, prompting the need for a "Not right now, never bother me again." check box.

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  • $\begingroup$ Yes popups are annoying, now i understand :) $\endgroup$ – TheRageMachine May 6 '16 at 9:00
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Ulus, in your case, I would not expect that you should not have a problem accessing files created in 2.76 from 2.77,after updating. I have sometimes experienced problems when attempting to open a ~.blend file created in a much older version, in a much newer one, for example, trying to open a file created in 2.4x, perhaps downloaded from a site like Blendswap. I have found that two things reduce problems when making such an attempt. One is to open the file in an intermediate version, save it, and then open it in a current version. So, if I download a file created in 2.49 or 2.5, I might open it first in 2.62 or 2.63, save it, and then open it in a more recent version. The other thing I discovered that reduces problems loading older files is to clear the the "Load UI" button in the file browser, outlined in the light blue box in the image below.

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If the button is not cleared, then the user interface stored in the file will load, and if it's an old enough file, the UI will be dramatically different than the one to which you are likely accustomed.

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  • $\begingroup$ Il make sure to do that, il also backup the original project file :) Thanks $\endgroup$ – TheRageMachine May 6 '16 at 9:00
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there should't be any issues with your projects after updating.

If you download Blender via Steam, it updates automatacly!

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Blender does not have an auto-update function, so you have to install new updates manually

There is practically no reason to keep using old versions except for familiarity. However, I would highly suggest using 2.8 and adapting to the new interface. It really isn't that hard and unless you want to use 2.79 forever, you will eventually have to use the new version.

There are many interesting new features in 2.8, including:

  • Eevee real-time Render Engine
  • Adaptive Sampling (in 2.83)
  • Improved Grease Pencil
  • New workspaces

You can see all of the changes here.

In addition, there are some other benefits to using 2.8:

  • Newer versions of blender tend to be faster (also rendering!)
  • New Tutorials will be made in 2.8 which makes it harder for you to follow along if you are using the old interface

If you don't skip too many versions, there should be no issues with using your old files.

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