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1

Multiplication reduces values when you're multiplying by a number less than 1, so the behavior of a multiply brush to reduce values shouldn't seem odd. While there is really no such thing as "proper usage", I often use a multiply brush after vertex assignment to create weight gradients, usually using a linear gradient. Whenever I use the multiply ...


3

You also need to have bones for the body and shoulders. Without it, the arms have nothing to blend. That's why in your image, parts with the lowest weight value still follow the arm.


2

You need to smooth out the weights between the shoulder and arm. The blur brush in weight paint mode can work quite well for this for this. The Blur brush is a separate tool from the standard brushes and can be found in the left hand side tool menu. You may also need to add a root/body bone and weight the stationary vertices to that, then blend between them. ...


0

An easy way to fix this is to parent the cloth to the armature. If it continues you can remove the cloth simulation as well.


-1

A few extra things that I've seen cause autoweight failure: Non-manifold geometry. In particular, edges that connect 3 or more faces. These can be found by using the "select non manifold" operation in edit mode on vertex or edge mode and changing it to operate only on "multiple faces" (but really, you should be fixing anything non-...


0

In case anyone finds this instead of the developer forum, because it is well hidden to say, this issue is known but not fixed if I am correct developer forum


5

You don't have to worry about normalization. You do have to worry about clamping. First, clamping. Blender will not let you use a vertex weight of less than 0.0 or greater than 1.0. (Well, I've seen some bugged files with negative values, but it's not supposed to happen.) Vertex group assignments are not intended to be used outside of this range, so ...


1

You can't have linked vertex position without also having all of your mesh data (weights, but also shapekeys, UV, vertex color) linked. Some things you can do instead: Unlinked objects that are surface deformed from a master prototype to track non-topological changes in the prototype Linked objects that are individually bone parented Use modifiers, like ...


0

If you're using weight painting symmetry, then your model is symmetrical, and presumably your bones are properly named with .l / .r, so you can use a mirror modifier instead (and thus, saving you some trouble when redoing some topo anyways.) Delete half of your model. (Select midline vert, "Select side of active" operation, ctrl i inverse ...


2

Select your armature, shift select your object, switch to Weight Paint mode, your armature will automatically switch to Pose mode, you can select the bone you want to see its vertex group. You can enable the Vertex Selection option to work on the vertices you want:


1

First, colors are not a good way to judge weights. You're not going to be able to see the difference between 0,0,1/255 blue and black. And if weights are even less than 1/255.... Second, realize that more bones than DEF_Front_Leg.003 are transforming. Everything parented to (or somehow constrained by) Front Leg.003 are also transforming. If your dog's ...


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