55

With out more detail about the situation, it's hard to say how you might go about this if there are any special considerations. Here are the basics: UV unwrap your object. Create a new image in the UV/image editor (Alt + N or Image > New). Add a texture node to the objects material(s) and select the new image. If there are more than 1 material repeat this ...


41

First you need to UV unwrap the model so the texture can be baked You should do this manually if you plan to need to create a real texture and you want a clean unwrapping. If you only need an AO map, Blender can do it for you automatically. First, split the viewport by clicking and dragging the grip found in the top right corner of the 3D viewport out from ...


30

Theory First thing normal map generators do is to converts the input image into a grayscale image, even if it is colored, that is because color information is practically useless in the generation process, the algorithm used to convert the RGB colors into single values varies from a generator to another, so it is recommended that you convert your input ...


29

Yes, using texture baking. The workflows are slightly different depending on the render engine you are using, but here's how to do it in cycles. A screenshot just to show how things are initially: Create a new UV map in Properties > Object data, then with it selected, edit or re-unwrap to make the second UV map layed out how you want it: Create a new ...


20

There are a couple different kinds of baking. Texture baking Baking could mean that you calculate specified data, and save it to a texture, which then you use in your material. The purpose of baking is to save in render times, because Blender recalculates all shadows, lighting and what not, every single frame, which results in a lot of time wasted time ...


14

Cycles Cycles bakes to the last selected image texture node in the object's material. Note that the node doesn't need to be connected to anything. Blender Internal This one is a bit confusing and non intuitive. You are mostly correct, you must assign all the faces to the texture as a Face texture. This is done by selecting the target image in the UV ...


14

Note: you must use a version above 2.79 to have access to the AO node: https://builder.blender.org/download/ Create an Emissive shader then add an Input > Ambient Occlusion. Check Inside and Only Local (surrounding objects won't affect the AO). For the distance I have used 0.4 on Suzanne but you can tweak it depending on the model and scale (don't forget to ...


13

Multiplying AO over diffuse/albedo/base color is never "right", hence why it often gives that overly shadowed and dirty look. This is a pretty famous blog post by Zap Andersson on the subject that sums it up really well: http://mentalraytips.blogspot.com/2008/11/joy-of-little-ambience.html The tl:dr if you don't feel like reading all that is that AO is not ...


13

Hand painted effect One texture is needed: a normal map. I recommend you to bake it in 32 or 16 bits float in order to get more depth on your curvature map and to bake it at a minimum resolution of 2048*2048. Once it's baked you will need to generate two maps from it: Generate a curvature map from a normal map: https://blender.stackexchange.com/a/72602/...


12

The high resolution mesh does not need to be UV mapped at all. Baking the normal map works by calculating the difference in the surface normal between a particular point on the low resolution mesh and the nearest point on the high resolution mesh. As long as they are sitting on top of each other, everything should work as expected. Above you can see the two ...


12

For baking in cycles each material slot requires image texture in the node setup, and it looks like even if the material slot is empty. To fix the error, remove the empty material slot from the object.


12

I have a technique which might be unorthodox but very efficient. The idea is to deform your mesh into its UV map while keeping the hair attached to it, so you can render it into a UV texture : I've used this technique on one model so far and it worked well. Here's a part of the result : Downsides it doesn't perform well on long or clumped hair it renders ...


11

The active object is the same no matter what action you are performing in blender. The active object is always the object you selected last. When using the default theme, the active object is outlined in yellow, and all other selected objects are in orange. If you selected your object in the wrong order, you can just ShiftRMB on the object again to make it ...


10

You can't bake directly with Filmic but you can composite the texture baked. Baking with Filmic Warning: before baking check if: GPU baking is enabled check if the normals are correct, to bake an interior scene the faces need to be oriented inward for your materials use the Diffuse and Emissive shaders only, the materials should not have reflections. ...


9

It's not actually required that you unwrap the high poly mesh for this operation to work, only that the two meshes be in the same location when you do the baking. Development of aberrations around corners is a common problem with normal maps. Cycles allows baking now and has a cage function that may help. Take your low poly model and make a duplicate of it....


9

That's probably because a low number of samples. Cycles uses samples to render and to bake. Turn up your samples in the Properties window under the Samples heading.


9

Select the high poly then the low poly mesh. So the active will be the low poly. Check the option Selected to Active in the Bake panel. Here is an example: To be able to do this you have to UV unwrap the plane or cuboid and assign a texture for the UV to bake on. But you have already done this. :) To use a cubeoid, you simply have to adjust it so that it ...


9

For Blender internal renderer, the important thing (as I just learned) is to understand Blender assigns textures in the Image Editor on a per face basis. So it's not enough to just load the texture in your UV/Image Editor; you have to load the texture while having the relevant UVs selected also. This way you match the image with the UVs and the image becomes ...


9

If you are baking with Cycles you just have to turn off the direct contribution when baking.


8

Here is a workflow you could use: Build the high poly mesh first. Add details as you like by adding separate meshes. Build the low poly mesh over high poly mesh, using Shrinkwrap and Surface Snapping to help. Separate your low poly meshes according to requirements (textures, extrusion etc). Bake your maps. This ensures correct normal and AO map bakes.


8

The results are correct. The reason it appears wrong is because the normal map is using tangent space (which is what you usually want) - tangent direction is based on the UV map, so there will usually be a difference in colour where there is a UV seam. However the colour difference is not an artefact. When used as a normal map (not as a colour map), ...


8

First of all, to understand how the normal directions are mapped to colours, see this excellent answer in gamedev.sa. Basically, the blue value is B = cos(alpha) × 0.5 + 0.5 and the red and green are the corresponding R or G = sin(alpha·(x or y)) × 0.5 + 0.5 values for both directions, with alpha being the angle away from the surface normal. You ...


7

You need to recalculate the normals of the object (Edit Mode > CtrlN). If you don't, the normals will all face inward (where there is no light).


7

Create object(s) close to the surface of the painted object (UV unwrapped object with a texture). Add various materials on different parts of the shape object. Add Subdivision Surface modifier with 2 or more subdivisions. Make creases where it is necessary to preserve sharp edges of the shapes. Add Shrinkwrap modifier with Target set to painted object and ...


7

Normal maps are not showing elevation of the faces, only normals angle (faces angle of high poly relative to low poly model), in your case all the normals facing low poly model exactly at the same angle, thats why you do not see any changes on the normal map. In an example below you can see that faces that are 90 degrees to low poly model are not visible.


7

As far as I know it's not possible to bake images with transparency in Cycles, but it's possible to figure out some workarounds, depending on what you want to achieve. To bake a transparent shadow texture: Set up your scene. I'll just use a simple tree in my example. Place a plane under your objects and scale it big enough to catch all the shadows. Create ...


7

While normal maps from textures can also be created within blender, there is another FLOSS software called AwesomeBump. It's not quite as user friendly as CrazyBump but it gets the job done. If you are on an AMD GPU system you will have to use the stable version 3.14 for now.


6

You'll need to do a Full Render bake. Textures and shadows can be disabled in the Shading panel of the render settings.


6

Create a second UV map on your object in Properties > Object Data and unwrap it so it has individual islands (or however you want) Blender Internal Add your existing texture to the object and select the appropriate UV map in Properties > Textures > Mapping > Map: Create a new image in the UV/Image editor by pressing AltN or Header > Image > New Select the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible