24

You can model the pyramids either scaling extruded individual faces to 0 and then removing doubles(w->r), or you could poke the faces(alt+p) and then select the middle vertices by the amount of adjacent faces or connecting edges(shift+g menu) and use Shrink/Flatten(alt+s) to move them outwards in the direction the surface is facing. You could then grow ...


17

The difference relies in in which device the actual calculations are done. CPU and OpenMP are run on the CPU, while GLSL Transform Feedback and GLSL Compute are run on the GPU. CPU - single threaded CPU implementation. it is mainly useful in cases when GPU compute is possible and threaded CPU option causes artifacts (it is unlikely to happen, but still ...


14

The Subdivide operator can be found: In the Context menu aka Specials menu (RMBor W in case of using 2.7 keymap) As part of the Edge menu in Edit Mode Or via Spacebar by searching for Subdivide


11

Sub-d surfaces generate a parametric surface with "infinite" quality that are easy to adjust (shifting holding edges, changing creasing,..), but this is what you pay with: polygons are subdivided everywhere, even where detail is not needed (this is not true for adaptive subdivision) most of the times the surface is not perfect: Adding detail will pull the ...


11

creasing edges with SHIFT + E could also be a non destructive option if you don't want to modify existing geometry


11

Another approach: Create a Z-scaled, subduvided UV sphere, and a capless cylinder, at the origin. Give the cylinder a few horizontal loops, and assign it a Srinkwrap modifier to the sphere; drag it down to a good-looking position in Z Select the N,S,E,W vertices on the top loop of the Cylinder, and with Proportional Edit / Linear falloff, drag the points ...


10

When using adaptive subdivision, your normal map node should not use tangent space, or your object will appear black. Instead, use object space, and it will render as expected. Object Space: Tangent Space: While I am not certain of the reason for this behavior, it is marked as a to do item in the tracker at the moment, rather than a bug.


10

You don't have to make several objects, you can keep all of your geometry in a single mesh, but if the pieces are separate in the real world referece, then separate them in modeling. You must have misunderstood some of the guidelines, this also won't increase your files size. It will likely decrease it because you can use simpler geometry. You can also ...


10

EDIT: haha, Leander beat me to it by 3 minutes with the same kind of answer :) For the reference image type of helmet (a stretched sphere) I definitely would start with a cube that has Subsurf modifier applied: After that, just add a new Subsurf modifier to it and it's smooth as silk and still quite easily editable:


10

Welcome to Blender Stack Exchange! It appears that they have removed the Subdivide Smooth option in 2.80 (at least in the version I have). However, it's always actually been a bit redundant as the Subdivide tool has a Smoothness slider that, when set to 1, behaves the exact same way as Subdivide smooth did. Plus, Blender will use your most recently used ...


10

add a subsurface modifier, select some edges and crease the edges it's a little easier of you crease the entire thing, then select a few edges and reduce the crease where you want it softer or rounder. creasing is quite versatile :D


9

Even at the risk of sounding demotivating: You can't subdivide a cylinder and call it modeling. I'd advise you to follow some basic modeling tutorials, before creating objects of your own. Your cylinder contains an n-gon, a face with more than four vertices and four edges. Ngons don't work well with the subdivision surface modifier. Create the topology from ...


9

Edit: actually, a bit simpler method. First, the destructive version: Create a 6 vertices circle. Subdivide it once. Extrude it inwards. Make its external edge loop a circle with W > Looptools > Circle. Extrude it up on the Z axis. Give it a Bevel modifier / Angle mode, with an Angle low enough to smooth the internal vertical edges. Smooth with a ...


9

Ignore the hole to begin with. The main shape appears to be a squashed cylinder, so create the main outline by scaling down one axis, then loop cutting/extruding and scaling to create the overall shape. For the neck the shape is circular so un-squash this section. For the large hole, boolean a cylinder then clean up the geometry afterwards. Start with a 16 ...


9

I think the best way to achieve trees with branches is to make use of the Skin Modifier. Begin by enabling a couple of add-ons ("Extra Objects"), if they're not already enabled. This will give you the ability to add a single vert from the mesh menu. Add a vertex, and give it a Skin Modifier. You can extrude points by selecting them and then Ctrl ...


9

Using 2.90.1+ version of Blender, in Cycles rendering, you can change the shadow terminator offset: This is per object, in the object property panel. A link to the documentation.


8

This is really a subjective topic and I don't think it can be answered with 100% certainty for you. Some high-level modelers will use sub-d's on a model like this, while others will not; it just depends on the the person and not necessarily the model, although the model itself is a factor. You also have to consider how the model is going to be used: Is it ...


8

Create a 6 sided mesh circle and rotate it $30º$ Now add a slightly larger circle with three times more sides $3 \times 6 = 18$ and also rotate it $30º$ Subdivide the inner circle with a number of cuts of 2 Bridge both circles and add the desired modifiers, like a Subsurf and Solidify Now you can adjust the smoothness of the inner edges by selecting the ...


8

Here are 2 ways (destructive and not) to do it:


8

Subdivision modifier and Edge Crease Subsurf disfigure the cylinder, until you tell him to maintain a sharp edge at the extremities. Select the edge loops at the extremities, then press Shift+E to enter in Edge Crease mode. Drag your mouse until the edges are perfectly sharp (Edge Crease = 1.0).


8

There are multiple relatively easy ways to achieve this. Manual modelling Start by adding a circle. Shift + a -> Mesh -> Circle Use the menu on the bottom left to set the vertex count (8 is fine, we can subdivide later) and the radius. press tab to switch to edit mode. make sure you select all vertices, and extrude them upwards. position the 3d ...


7

The difference between Adaptive subdivision and Dynamic topology is the way the surface gets subdivided. Both triangulate the mesh but use different algorithms. Adaptive subdivision: each polygon is divided into a number of micro-polygons based on camera distance and screen pixel size these micro-polygons are displaced at render-time with texture the ...


7

This can happen when your normals are flipped on part of the mesh. Pretty common with Mirror operations. The problem is that the Subdivision Surface Modifier is interpolating between the inside and the outside of the mesh, at this point, so for the vertices in between they are returned to their original positions. To diagnose problems like this you can ...


6

Same example: Becomes: The solution is: 1. Select the edges you don't want to be subdivided In the right bar (Press N to show it) set the "Mean Crease" value to 1 (it sets how much the selected edges don't react to subdivision smoothness Edit: note that the face is still subdivided but the subfaces created by subdivision mantain the original position. No ...


6

No, you can't use Vertex Groups for Subdivision Surface modifier. What you can do is select region you want to have smoother and use W > Subdivide Smooth. Be aware that this method will create ngons and/or tris (when Quad/Tri Mode is checked).


6

Your source mesh has front and back capping faces, deleting those gets rid of the seams: However, there's a better way to build this shape. Get rid of the cylinder, and add a bezier or nurbs circle. On the path (not the circle) go down to bevel object, and select the circle from the dropdown, and also check "fill caps" Not only do you not need to worry ...


6

I guess your mesh has something different in the bottom: I think you have a single bottom face (N-gon), which is causing this issue... if you have this (sorry for the horrible mesh, I'm before breakfast...) subsurf behaves well while if you have a single N-gon face subsurf behaves like in your model if unsure, share your model through http://blend-...


6

The main reason is that subdivision adds verts. No matter how good your project, no matter how much time you're willing to spend on rendering, everyone has a limit. Each level of subdivision multiplies your face/vert count by 4. So three levels multiply it 64-fold, 4*4*4. Okay, but let's say you can spare a 64-fold vert increase. Is there any reason not ...


6

This was a bug (at the time of writing this answer), which got fixed in https://developer.blender.org/T58994 Basically the rest of the answer is redundant now, as 2.80 shows the same crease behavior as 2.79 since the bug was fixed. Automated builds will be updated starting from 24. 01. 2019. Old answer This is a bug still in the beta of Blender 2.8. The ...


6

Your mesh has some large N-gons, but Subdivision works best with Quads. You can either repair the topology, or start from scratch with quads. Depends on you, both ways are fine. Two ways of making quad topology.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible