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6

the comments section suggested I go with EXR for all my brushes. This sounds like a great idea, but I'd like to know what the difference is compared to PSD. Every third party brush set I've ever downloaded is usually PSD. What do I gain by converting from PSD to EXR? PSD is an undocumented and proprietary format. The only reason it works beyond Adobe is the ...


4

You can use your pictures as references, create a plane and subdivide it: Extrude it up, extrude the fingers: Rotate the front face or use the Shear tool, then continue to extrude and rotate: Begin to work on the thumb: Give it a Subdivision Surface modifier, change the topology appropriately:


4

It looks like this is because of two things. First is the default falloff settings. Just below the texture heading is a falloff heading, shown below: The default is a smooth falloff, which has a strength of 0 at the edges, even at full hardness I believe. The solution is to switch to a constant falloff. Just be aware that this can cause hard edges on the ...


4

The fidelity of your brushes has to do with how you are creating them and how you are interpreting the data, in other words: you must be sure how the data is encoded and interpret it accordingly in blender. Applying the wrong interpretation will result in distortion. For displacement maps, like sculpt brushes, you would expect the map to be data, in a linear ...


3

This is just a half-answer. Causes As I looked closely into the difference of your meshes ... Some of the wrinkle in your sculpting is more in the diagonal direction of the edge than the tutorial. Your brush seem to adjust only in Normal direction of the mesh, but tutorial brush seems to also pull nearby vertices close together to keep up with the deep ...


3

The behavior is caused by Autosmooth (Sidebar (N) > Tool > Brush Settings). This setting controls the amount of smoothing that is applied to each brush stroke. In your project the positive displacement of the clay brush is cancelled out by the stronger Autosmooth. The strength of Autosmooth depends both on the factor in the tool settings and the ...


2

You can't sculpt 2 objects at the same time, and even joining the 2 objects won't be enough to create a weld between the 2 as they will still be 2 separate meshes. What you need to do is either keep them 2 separate objects and use the Boolean modifier, or join them and use the Boolean tool (the one I explain below). In both case make sure that the mode is ...


2

In my experience, this can be addressed by adjusting your Refining and Detailing settings under the Dyntopo section of the Properties Panel. What I have found is that you want to be mindful of the rate at which geometry is being increased by your strokes, or else bad things can happen. For example, if you use the Inflate brush with high influence and high ...


2

I had the same issue for hours in Blender 2.9 It appears everytime I apply boolean modifier on two or more objects or when I join them. My assumption is that it might be because of different face densities. The solution from John Eason is working for me. Just turn off the Face Sets.


2

You need to enable Dyntopo in the left panel, otherwise the tool will only displace geometry, until it gets horribly mangled and creates artifacts. Dyntopo will generate new geometry on the fly, provided you don't move your mouse too fast it should create a smooth hook. Don't forget to tweak the detail size if you think the generated geometry doesn't fit. ...


2

Go to Object Mode, select the object, go to Modifier Properties and change Level Viewport value to bigger than zero until your modifications shows up in Object Mode. This, it seems is an effect of using Multires modifier. I found this solution in the answer Why is object mode slow but sculpt mode fast?


1

Just expand the ► Symmetry section (next section in your screenshot), at the bottom there is the Symmetrize button. (Blender 2.91)


1

You're on the right track with sculpting. However your first priority should be to create a simple base mesh of the entire character before moving on to details like the mouth and its stitches. You can do this by blocking everything out with primitives and then joining them later. Here's an example of stylized base meshes (Credit to VeryHotShark on Gumroad): ...


1

You can drag the mouse in the direction of the option of the pie menu while holding Ctrl+Tab and once you release it with the mouse moved in the direction of the option you want it will get chosen. That might be more convenient.


1

I figured it out. The falloff shape option under the falloff menu should be set to project. This makes the cursor stay a circle no matter the plane.


1

Yes,it can be done. But probably what prevents you to do so is: there's already another "shortcut" using the same combination in Sculpt, by default. if you search for "sculpt" in preferences, you'll see that there are three different mouse/keyboard combinations to do the "sculpt" action, including this: you can remove it by clicking on the "x" icon right ...


1

You're using modifiers: Mirror and Subdivision Surface. Blenders modifiers get applied after the geometry is evaluated. This means your only sculpting on this very low poly mesh even though you can see the result of the modifiers. Apply the modifiers first if you want to sculpt on their generated geometry.


1

I was able to sculpt when I applied the two modifiers (mirror & sub) and filled the holes in Edit Mode (select all + f for fill). I don't know enough about the sculpt tools but maybe brushes like crease need closed meshes. Depending on what you want to do don't expect high resolution and details without Dyntopo on this one.


1

You need to click your object to active select (Yellow outline not orange) the object you want to sculpt in object mode. Any other selections(orange outline) will not be sculpted in sculpt mode. See here for more on selecting: https://docs.blender.org/manual/en/latest/scene_layout/object/selecting.html You can change your shading mode in the upper right ...


1

Nascent Space's comment: If you didn't add enough geometry to sculpt, it won't do anything unless you click on the corners of it. Make sure to either turn on dyntopo at the top right of the sculpting viewport or add a subdivision surface in the modifiers tab, or just subdivide the cube in edit mode.


1

try Ctrl + shift + Z to cancel the Ctrl Z


1

You could create a new, empty project, go to Sculpt, then try to DragDrop import your broken .blend file. Then Choose "append". Or Choose File->Append... Then navigate to "object" Folder ("Mesh" didn't work for me). Choose your Mesh. https://imgur.com/yq0lEMP


1

I hope you solved this. In case it helps, I want to add that face sets don't seem to work when dyntopo is enabled. If you disable this then it should work.


1

You have to go the the modifiers tab and then click the small monitor icon. This will hide (not delete) the subdivision surface modifier. This will then show you the UV Face Sets


1

Blender is a complex application. I don't know exactly what I did, but at the point when I wrote my question, for some reason I had changed the Draw mode to Add instead of Mix. Once I put it back to Mix, it worked as expected and I was able to keep working in this project.


1

In Sculpt Mode click Sculpt (to the right of where Sculpt Mode is shown) and now > "Show All". For some reason, Alt + H doesn't unhide properly between edit-mode and sculpt-mode for me. So if I hide vertices in edit-mode and switch back to sculpt mode, the connecting faces are gone. Going back to edit-mode, pressing Alt + H reveals the hidden ...


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