7

Here's my attempt. I didn't test it extensively, and it won't match everything. But it matches what I tried. def ugly_fcurve_name(fc): return "%s[%d]" % (fc.data_path, fc.array_index) def nice_index_name(prop, index): vectoritems = "XYZW" quatitems = "WXYZ" coloritems = "RGBA" if 0 <= index <...


6

F-Curves that are part of transforms come in sets of three or four. Internal code relies on their array_index value to generate the axis name, or "W" in case of Quaternions. Other F-Curves also don't have a friendly name and internal code translates the name to display names. The following code needs tidying up to put into an actual application, ...


4

You can do it with a pretty straightfoward Geometry Nodes modifier : On a new object, add a Geometry Nodes modifier. Do the boolean difference of Object A with B, and then B with A. You'll end up with two meshes separated by one or several edge lines at their intersection. Then compute the distance between each vertex of one of the meshes and the vertices ...


4

Have a look into Text Editor -> Templates -> Python. Quickly combined Operator Mesh UV and UI Panel Simple templates. You can never be sure, but no crashes while testing... import bpy import bmesh class HelloWorldPanel(bpy.types.Panel): """Creates a Panel in the Object properties window""" bl_label = "Hello ...


4

As mentioned in my previous answer, name is instantiated by default. Notice that the coding style/quality of the example given is not particularly beautiful, try to revise the code under consideration of Create an interface which is similar to the material list box. import bpy from bpy.types import PropertyGroup from bpy.props import ( ...


3

The prop function returns the item it used. You can modify the state of that of item. Change your col.prop to something like prop = col.prop(gm, '["Input_13"]', text="Min_Size") prop.min = -3.0e-38 prop.max = 3.0e-38 prop.hard_min = -3.0e-38 prop.hard_max = 3.0e-38 et cetera if you want to change the min and max values. You would of ...


3

As it turns out, for reasons I should have known, you can't do precisely what you want. Perhaps this will work well enough in its place. The problem is that in order to add properties to a class, that class has to inherit from one of three classes and NlaStrip, the class you would like to add properties to does not inherit from any of them. However, every ...


2

You need to update the View Layer after assigning the value to the dimensions: import bpy from bpy import context as C o = C.active_object print(o.dimensions) o.dimensions.x = 2 C.view_layer.update() print(o.dimensions) o.dimensions.y = 3 C.view_layer.update() print(o.dimensions) o.dimensions.z = 4 C.view_layer.update() print(o.dimensions) Output for ...


2

Scaling in the sense you mean is really scaling the distance between the 3D cursor and the object. Here's an example, step-by-step that does that. It can be written much simpler but this is meant to show the details: import bpy from mathutils import Vector # Assuming you want to scale each dimension differently scale_x = 1.0 scale_y = 2.0 scale_z = 3.0 # ...


2

If you define "active" as "cursor is in the area", then you need to have an actual test for where the mouse is. Here's a demonstration of an operator that figures out if the mouse is in the 3D Viewport. You need to modify it so that it puts the value somewhere appropriate to your needs rather than just reporting it. You then need to ...


1

Put “#frame” in the input. that sets up driver that uses frame number as value. math nodes can change result.


1

You can use Keyframes for this task. Even if you don't see a diamond icon for keyframing you are still able to add keyframes. Hover mouse cursor over the value slider and press I. This will add a keyframe that you can use for animating the value


1

I figured it out, I needed to add all of the Properties I used in my main_properties.py file into my Operator. Then reference those as self instead of using the scene = bpy.context.scene; tool = scene.tools. I was referencing tool which was routing back to my side panel addon Properties Attributes. It should look like this. class VIEW3D_OT_Blueprint(bpy....


1

Pie menus are arranged in the order West, East, South, North, Northwest, Northeast Southwest Southeast; as you said. If you have more than 8 entries, the cycle repeats, causing entries to lie on top of each other. To skip an entry, insert a separator() layout element. Since you want North and South with two item, something like this fragment works: def ...


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