New answers tagged

3

From the screenshot, it looks like the bones' heads (roots) are at the right place, but only their tails (tips) are somehow far away. This looks like a rig from an external program that has been badly imported to Blender. Some programs don't have notions of start points and end points for bones, they are just unique points. That's why sometimes you have &...


1

Scale the armature to the right height and then apply the scale. The model should scale to match. Then select the model and apply scale to it.


1

I think the first disappointment that new riggers experience is that "with automatic weights" is not infallible. First, when you parent, watch the bottom center of the screen to see if you get the infamous "bone heat" message. But you do not have that problem. Second, be prepared to learn about Weight Painting and Vertex Groups. You do ...


2

I found a solution here: Orient Custom Shape addon stopped working in versions above 2.9? I put the folder containing init.py in Blender addons path and orient custom shape installed successfully for 2.93


6

The issue here isn't the rig. As you can see, the rig behaves the same on both sides: What is different is how the mesh is deformed. If you go in Weight Paint mode, you will see that the toe area is assigned at full weight bot to your toe group and foot root: The solution is to remove the toe part from the foot weights. Since you have it selected in Edit ...


2

You've moved your armature in Pose mode, so it is not aligned with the Rest pose anymore. The Rest pose will show the bones as they are in Edit mode. To reset the bones position, select them all in Pose mode and press AltG (reset location), AltR (reset rotation) and AltS (reset scale).


2

in rest pose add Empty at tip (tail) of your EndBone IK Constraint on EndBone > Target = Empty, with Rotation enabled Bone Properties > Invers Kinematics > Lock XYZ


0

Ok, if i understood you right, just just want to "offset" your target, right? remove IK controller from bone 6 select bone 6, tab for edit mode, select its tail, press E Z to extrude a new bone Note : Be careful, that you really get bone6 selected - i had to click twice on its tail to get the right bone. The name should be bone7, then you got ...


2

I also think that the default rot of Rigify rigs isn't well suited for graph editor editing. You can change this behaviour selecting the Metarig, then go to pose mode, select the first bone of the arm bones chain and change its rotation axis from "Automatic" to "X manual" in its Rigify Type preferences. In a similar way you can correct ...


0

Create 2 new vertex groups, one containing only vertices you want to preserve volume, the other all others vertices. Add a new armature modifier targeting your rig, and use the vertex group limit function to have the desired result. Another method using one new vertex group only:


0

The reason for this is because those bones that you reparented have a bone constraint to the root bone which also applies the transform. Go into Pose Mode then under Rig > Pose > root > [reparented bone] > Constraints > SWITCH_PARENT, disable it with the eye icon. You can also select the reparented bone and go to the Bone Constraint Properties ...


1

For who still want to find a solution now, and assuming you want to do this in Blender (not scripting). In Blender 2.93 select your armature, go to Pose mode, press N on your keyboard to bring up the panel, in Tool enable X-Axis Mirror. Then you're good to go.


2

First solution I found: upgrade the face rig BEFORE setting your rig, I wouldn't recommend you to delete one side of the meta-rig to symetrize it later, just use the mirror and place the bones...


1

Found it. Sorry it too so long. You have filters enable. Select the filter drop down in the dope sheet and you will see this: I've highlighted Collection in red. The filter is preventing you from seeing any animation data except for object in Collection collection. Click the 'x' and you'll be able to see everything.


0

The issue is solved by weighting duplicated vertices of toe and foot bones to only toe.


2

Mixamo's source data definitely doesn't follow same conventions, bone structure, naming, rig etc ... it generates issues ... here it looks like the data was automatically processed to keep feet contact with a floor without care of specific kind of motion. Motion is baked into bone rotations keyframes per frame, that make it quite difficult even for just 30 ...


2

add a base bone, animate rotation. add another bone with trackto to constraint to bone.003 add another bone, unparent it, move it as in picture. Add trackto constraint to bone.001. result: Note: Of course, bone.003 is just "one" wing. Do the same on the other side or use mirroring. Lenghten Bone.001 to get a "lower" wing movement. ...


1

If I enable the modifier's On Cage option, select the vertex, open the N panel and take a look at the Vertex Weights, I can see that this vertex is also part of the group called Spine2. Just remove it from this group (press the X button): Parenting With Automatic Weights won't always work fine, you often need to give it correction in Weight Paint mode. ...


1

I think it has to do with your 2 tibias. First thing, recalculate their roll with ShiftN > Global X Axis: Then rotate then -90° with CtrlR in order to align with the other ones: It looks like you have similar problems for the arms. Also it's probably better to keyframe all the bones at frame 1. Original pose: Inverse pose:


1

On the newest versions of Blender, you should drag the Particles Modifier on top of the stack, then, in Object Mode, click the button Make Instances Real. This operation will spawn the hair as a mesh, then you have to parent it to the bone.


2

The quickest way might be the Drivers Editor. Open sidebar (N-Panel) and select tab Drivers. Deactivate 'Show Only Selected' in header and expand all channels. When a driver is clicked the targetbone is displayed in Sidebar > Driver > Bone. This must be done for each driver to see all bones. Not really sexy, I think. Let's do it with python. In ...


5

In this kind of rigs I generally use drivers and maths (simple Pythagoras theorem). You can copy the Hypothenuse lenght in edit mode, and paste this value into the driver expression. Hypotenuse bone is child of the mover bone and has a damped track constraint targeting the affected bone. Mover bone has a limit location constraint to prevent square root of ...


0

I've tried fiddling around with your rig and honestly, the best solution might be to use drivers. Don't be scared, they don't have to be too daunting. Look up a beginner tutorial for drivers. What you want to achieve is for the X movement of your Mover bone to drive the Z movement of your end bone. You may have to tweak it slightly to keep it in sync. This ...


0

Change Xpath with Xpath = obj.path_from_id() + "[\"increment X\"]"


0

To solve this problem I only had to select the head and tail of the bones as well. This is the working code now: import bpy def create_tgt(): armature = bpy.data.objects['Armature'] # Use your armature name bones = armature.data.edit_bones[:] # This'll give us a list with all bones if not bpy.context.mode == 'EDIT_ARMATURE': bpy.ops....


1

A broad use of this kind of structure is sometimes called "Socket", in which Bone A is child of bone B, and bone B is constrained by Bone C. In this way when you move C, bone A and B will follow, but you still have the freedom of adjusting bone A (while bone B is constrained and maybe can't be directly moved). As you're interested in rigging, I ...


1

Since you have an IK, it should be relatively easy: just set the IK controller's parent to the root instead of the hips. BUT, ideally, you want to be able to use both depending on the situation. In which case, you also want to add Child of constraints to your IK controllers, pointing to your hips controller. Then you can turn that constraint on and off via ...


2

Not necessarily. It usually means that the rig was generated, because the most common use of the ORG prefix is to identify the bones as they existed in the model rig. There are many other add-ons that generate rigs from a mode and keep the original bones with the ORG prefix added, and at least one rigger has said on Blender StackExchange that they use the ...


1

Meta-Rigs Rigify uses the so-called Meta-Rigs to generate the actual rig. The Meta-Rigs is used to tell Rigify where the bones are located and how your model looks like. The generation of the rig fails because you try to create a metarig armature from scratch and haven't defined any of the needed rig types for the bones. These define various parts of the rig ...


1

For some reason, as you say, the armature you've assigned to your character is no longer in T pose, its new pose (with arms down) make the Walking action mess up the bones because of their new orientations. To fix that, you can duplicate the Armature modifier (in the modifier, down arrow button > Duplicate), in Pose mode, reset all the bones (AltR and ...


4

As you can see in the N panel if you select one vertex of the pinky, it is also assigned to the Hand.L vertex group while it should not: If you select the armature, then Shift select the mesh, switch to Weight Paint mode and select the bone called Hand.L you can see the vertex group called Hand.L that will be influenced by the bone. As you can see the ...


4

In Rigify rigs eyes are supposed to be a separate mesh (if not, select an eye in edit mode and press P to separate it from the rest). Then select the eye, shift select the armature, activate the 30th bone layer, select the MCH-eye bone (the only one which has a little target bone on its tip) and press Ctrl p > Bone. The same applies to teeth, in this ...


1

It sounds like you disconnected the spine chain somewhere... or maybe you connected a bone that shouldn't be connected. The rule for the individual Rigify parts is: All bones of one "rig type" must be parented and connected. Individual rig types can be parented but not connected. I hope this makes sense. From what you describe, enabling "...


2

These disconnected arms don't impact the rigging much, it actually make it simpler. You could just use Rigify the usual way. It's just that the arms par of the rig will have no mesh to deform, and that's OK. It is actually interesting to keep the arms in the rigging: when you want the hands to have a natural movement, you will animate with invisible arms ...


2

It indicates where your driver is currently at. If you move the driving object around you will see it move.


2

Did you notice that I asked you for a blend file but you pasted a screen capture instead? I think the problem you are having is that you need to follow tutorials exactly until you have a working example and you're not doing that. I'm going to give you another example tutorial. Follow it until you've done it right, as a way to practice solving your problem....


0

I have the same problem using on my character's hair sinking or moving out of position. Did't work out when I try changing the parent's bone. I solved it by turning Amplitude Rotation to 0, 10 will make it sink. Hope this will help.


2

Here's a string where all bones are root level: I'm showing rest position and three consecutive operations there. Constraints for one bone are shown; the rest are identical, they just have different targets. There are a few deals with this: You don't rotate about some specific center. You rotate about a cursor (which can be snapped to a bone if you want.)...


2

You made the mesh the parent of the rig. That's the wrong relationship. Steps to fix it: switch to Object mode, select the metarig armature and clear its parent with Alt+P > Clear Parent. apply the Scale to the armature with Ctrl+A > Scale. (This resets the scale transformation of the object to 1.0 and it is important for the calculation of the ...


1

I have the same issue, but I have noticed that, when this method is used, the bones are selected, BUT not the heads nor the tails. If you try to select them manually in the outliner or use the "bpy.ops.armature.select_all(action='SELECT')" command line, then everything is selected (bones, tails and heads) and duplicate works properly. I don´t know ...


1

Yes, you can do that: We'll start by making an empty at the position of the pole that we want the the cloth to be controlled by, then we'll vertex parent that empty to the pole. Next, we'll create a hook modifier for the cloth object. To be affected by a hook, a vertex needs to be assigned to the hook. The easiest way to make a hook is to select a vertex ...


0

ok so i just realized this is a stupid question. the answer is to just do a better weight painting job


0

Well, It seems masking works. By going into edit mode and selecting one of the loose parts (click on it, select -> linked -> linked), and then going into weight paint mode, I can restrict the selection to just this one object. It's clunkier than Maya's solution, but It works sufficiently well.


1

Looks like the origin of the model is where the armature has been placed. If so, select the character, press shift C to center the 3D cursor, right click and choose "set origin to 3D cursor. Check also if model or armature has some delta transform, and zero them out.


1

In order to control the face in a MakeHuman model that has been rigified, you need to enable the Face control panel. For unknown reasons, it is hidden by default. To make the Face control panel visible, select the generated rig, go to the Armature Object Data Properties tab and add Armature Layer 2 to the selected armature layers (Shortcut: Shift Left Click)...


1

As This answer explains, Every rigger uses [their] own bone naming conventions, prefixes or suffixes, usually in agreement with animators for which the rig is intended (in studio). There is no standard, but there are however some commonly used terms [emphasis mine] The answer goes on to explain that ORG is commonly used as a prefix for original bones of ...


2

Rigify is a custom Blender complex rig, with lots of bones and constraints. All bones have to be placed in an exact location, matching the model's features. Using a simple source armature (wich is called Metarig) you can choose the placement of the deforming bones, then pressing the "Generate" button a Python script will create all the useful bones ...


1

You don't. The whole point of parenting is that the children move with the parent. But, if you don't connect the child bone to the parent bone then you can move the child after you've moved the parent: If you really want the child to only sometimes be a child, instead of parenting it, give it a Child Of constraint. You can then set the influence to 0 ...


0

The underlying problem is that when you deleted the face from the meta rig, you confused rigify about what should be the head. Until you've become proficient at rigify you should never modify a metarig. Even when you are proficient it's better to generate a rig and modify it. Rather than have you go all the way back and edit a metarig to fit your A pose, ...


0

This attempted answer maybe somewhat vague but I think your solution may involve some trial and error with the functions: Duplicate, 'make instances real' in the [object->apply] menu 'separate by loose parts' while in [edit mode] physics simulations I hope this can help, forgive me if you have already tried these :) Best regards, John


Top 50 recent answers are included