20

Final result One method is to create a volumetric cylinder and distort it by rotating it around the origin by an amount that varies based on the distance from the origin. First, create a volumetric cylinder. This is achieved by calculating the distance from the origin in just two of the three dimensions (it's effectively a circle projected along the ...


18

Creating a Procedural Polished Granite Material Guessing you're probably no longer in need of this effect, but thought I'd write a (hopefully) short tutorial in case anyone is interested in creating a Realistic Procedural Polished Granite Material in future. This is the final setup and material that we'll be creating :D (3mins49secs @ 750x1000px on CPU) ...


17

Making a birch shader completely procedural is quite a challenge, this is my version: (download blend file below) Like the other two answers already say: you archive these effects with stretched noise textures, color ramps and mix nodes. It takes quite a bit of time and experimenting to figure out wich noise looks best for the specific surface. I mainly ...


16

Here's what I could come up with. It mostly relies on using a Voronoi texture squashed in Z axis, and a Color Ramp node to control the "spot radius" for the smaller spots. For the bigger branch dark spots or nodes, again the same setup of Voronoi texture with a Color Ramp node to control the blotch size, the only addition is mixing texture coordinates with ...


15

In order to have the procedural texture radiate from the centre you need to base in on the direction and the distance from the centre - you can then animate an offset on the distance in order to animate the 'blobs' moving in the desired direction from the centre. Using Object coordinates, a direction vector can easily be obtained by using the Vector Maths ...


13

Use a Voronoi texture node to control roughness and normal (bump). Use a mapping node to stretch the texture in z-axis and animate the z-axis location to make the rain drops run down the sides: On top of this, try to experiment with a noise texture to modulate the x and y axis to make the drops go down in a not so straight line. Note: This approach only ...


12

Instead of using a musgrave node as in your .blend-file, I used two noise nodes where one of them controls the scale of the second one to make the fade "grainy". I also made the ColorRamp gradient a bit softer. See the node tree below:


9

Found it. The idea is to use a gradient node in radial mode and plug it to the angle of a rotation node (just like a Mapping node but with an input socket for the rotation). Since such a node doesn't exist in Blender we make it with math nodes. First the rotation node itself (it's a node group) : then the general setup (the green node is the rotation we ...


9

I don't know if you'd find it easier, but I often use split vector values for this and (greater/less than) math node: As you can see, this way you can easily control position on the object. Creating a line from this is simply a matter of offsetting the value in both directions and adding the results: You can easily make it more compact, but I'll leave it ...


9

While @DuateFarrajotaRamos's answer will seem to work for small angles of rotation, it only approximates rotation and will not achieve 360 degree rotation mentioned in the question. Instead, you can apply a rotation matrix to the actual vectors concerned. A solution is mentioned as part of this answer https://blender.stackexchange.com/a/77638/29586 - where ...


9

Assuming your windows are fairly regularly spaced you can separate the individual 'windows' in the window material by using a Modulo function to convert each of the X,Y,Z Object coordinates into a 'stepped' function. This separates the surface into individual 'cells'. By carefully setting the spacing of the 'cells' (the Modulo functions) to match the ...


9

Your technique seems to be the most adequate for the illustrated effect, just needs some tweaking. All you have to do is run your Voronoi texture through two Color Ramps, one for transparency and one for color. Add two stops to each so you can control progression smoothly. You can control "cluster size" from a black to white color ramp connected to the ...


8

Brick texture can be tweaked to resemble pixels, It can be combined with a colorramp to get different colors in a randomized pattern.


8

Instead of relying on the checker node, we can make our own pseudo-checkers with randomized values between zero and one, then feed the result into a color ramp node, with constant interpolation. Here it is, broken into a few steps: Scaling up the texture coordinates, round them to integers, and scale them back down to the original range (I'm pretty sure ...


8

Here's an alternative solution using maths nodes to calculate distance from the square and the Gaussian distribution function. The key here is for any point in the shader to calculate the closest point to the square. The square is defined by 4 boundary values - X-Min, X-Max, Y-Min, Y-Max. To calculate the closest point that is still within the square we ...


7

For your purposes, a particle system based setup will work best as any material will cause the grains inside to appear very flat. Starting with your blend file, on the object Cylinder.001, under Particles > Emission, I set these values: End: 1 Emit From: Volume Distribution: Grid Distribution Resolution: 5 Distribution Random: 1 Now we have an object ...


7

I came up with this but if I were to go this route I would use this setup as a mask and create the other two textures independently.


7

You can convert Object coordinates into Polar coordinates using the 'arctangent' trigonometric function by using : arctangent(y/x) This will produce a result in Radians (where there are pi radians in 360 degrees) although without additional nodes it will only produce results for half the rotation (and will produce negative values). The following nodes ...


7

The Rings mode of the Wave Texture node radiates from the object center in concentric shells. Because of that, the surfaces of your spheres are passing through a single shell, and therefore a single color. If you look at the edges of your images, where the distance from the center is a bit further, you can see that they are darkened: To fix this, you can ...


7

Before even jumping into the node editor, identify the different components you will need for your shader. The first thing to notice is that the surface is completely diffuse. There are no subsurface or glossy components visible. The color consists of a bright yellow and a darker reddish/orangy color. The parts that are facing upwards are paler, weathered by ...


7

One way of doing this would be: Separate all your tiles as a single object so you can use the Object info node random output in order the create a tile black and white mask: You can then create another wave texture and combine it with the one you already have using the tile mask as factor: You obviously need to change the texture coordinate of the second ...


7

This method uses the array modifier, so you do not have to do any destructive editing to your object. Here I modeled a single tile and use two array modifiers to make the floor. Note the two extra vertices (highlighted in red) in the bottom left and top right corners of my tile. They are there to make the space around the tiles. It can be done in the array ...


6

Final: Overview: I've simplified node that you've mentioned in question and I've added surface material (really simple, you can use whatever you want instead). You can control black bits size, distortion, amount and color. Blend file:


6

Here is another attempt, using Musgrave noise to create an overall uneven distribution to the dirt: Material node setup: The Voronoi Crackle node group: Here is the blendfile.


6

I have made a node setup that renders like this: It consists of two diffuse shaders. One is your stone texture from above (well almost). The other is a simple green "dirt" material. The real trick is to combine the dirt with the stone in a believable pattern. I tried multiplying two noise textures with some distortion. Distortion makes noise be liked two ...


6

Enter Edit Mode on the Sphere Object, press U and unwrap using "Sphere Project". In the Node Editor, press shift+A>>Texture>>Texture Coordinate and connect the "UV" Output with the "Vector" Input in the Brick Texture node. Finished! I hope this helps you ;)


6

Yes, you can. But you need to use different modifiers for this. First, remove subsurf and use multires+displacement: You need to use multires for simplicity in creating normal map for game engine. With normal map you can create a detailed object without complex geometry, that important for game engines. For creating normal map, unwrap your object (U), ...


6

You can use the Tissue addon. The addon will tesselate a given shape on a mesh. Select a tile, shift select your mesh, and use 'tesselate': From that, if you want to modify the original mesh, you can come back to the tesselation and refresh it.


5

There are several issues with your model that prevent proper results. You have inverted normal in your model - Unrelated to texturing but can cause issues, fix it by ticking Flip in the Screw modifier Your curve object has unnaplied transformations (more importantly scale) and has an offcentered origin point, both of which will negatively affect your ...


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