Hot answers tagged

14

Final result: I will show you two methods, first one (Translucent) is recommended because it's a lot faster approach and also with less geometry. For both of them you will need Mix Shader with Transparent BSDF and Alpha from Image Texture as a Factor. Example above is rendered with only 32 samples. Beneath both meshes there is a light source to show the ...


9

First thing to have in mind is that you have some conflicting data, and some redundant maps that can't all be used at the same time because their functionality overlaps. Second thing to have in mind is that Blender Cycles is a physically accurate renderer, that means the results tend to converge to a physically realistic solution. Some of the maps you have ...


7

There isn't an exact answer to this. In older-style shaders it was typical to independently control specular intensity and specular size(also called hardness or glossiness and other names). This isn't how real-world surfaces actually work though. The reflectivity of a real surface is determined by the refractive index of the surface, and the roughness of ...


7

Workflow for Principled BSDF Use Non-Color color space for most textures. Only Color and AO maps use sRGB color space List of maps and where to connect them Diffuse/Color → Base Color Ambient Occlusion → use with Eevee, not with Cycles Metalness → Metallic Roughness → Roughness Gloss → add Invert node and plug into Roughness Specular/Refl → don't use, ...


6

If an object is diffuse it will be diffuse in glass same as in the air or in water. If you drop something diffuse into water it does not become reflective because water is reflective it stays diffuse unless there is some other material in between it and water like for example air bubbles stuck in surface imperfections, dirt or oil, or something else or if ...


5

Actually, it is the specular value input, specular is reflectivity. It's just that in some non PBR setups specular is a way of faking a reflected highlight without calulating actual reflections, and they called it specular. But in the principled shader specular means reflection and that's where you would put the reflection map, also sometimes called a ...


4

In your image editor select corresponding color on your card and make black and white mask for metal, where white is metallic part. Invert that mask for roughness map (or make new mask for more control). Modify your card material in node editor to use principled shader, where base color connects to your original image. Use your metal mask for metal, rough ...


4

The normal texture needs to go tough the Normal Map node. The texture data is normalised so the normal vector is between 0 and 1 (0.5 as mid value) for each channel. This needs to be recalculated to be in the range from -1 to 1 (0 as mid value). It will also convert the tangent space vector to world space. If you need to scale the UV coordinates, the Mapper ...


4

Since Blender 2.8, you've been able to set a U and V offset per element in an array. Well,OK, that's an offset. But it gives you access to more. The elements' UVs change at the same rate as the Generated UVs of the whole array. So if you have set any UV offsets in your Array modifiers, and then take the difference between the element UV and the array's ...


3

It is not possible to simulate light interactions in a physically accurate way in Blender. I believe what you are observing there is thin film interference, so it is likely not only polystyrene that we are looking at, but it's coated with something. Producing this effect visually a bit more accurately is possible in other renderers like Maxwell, there are ...


3

Cycles, or really any renderer for graphics is not a completely physically accurate model of light. Cycles in particular uses an rgb based model for colour, rather than a spectral model (luxrender does use a spectral model for colour which may get slightly better results for stuff like this). As far as I know, neither bother to model things like coherence or ...


3

I am no guru (:P), but as far as i can see: It is a lot easier now in Blender 2.79 with the "Principled BDSF shader" in cycles shader setup: 1) plug the diffuse "gravel_d.png" into the colour socket 2) plug the specular "gravel_s.png" into the specular slider 3) plug the gloss "gravel_g.png" into the roughness slider (with an "invert colour node" in between)...


2

Today's final result will be this: Diffuse/Ambient Occlusion Plug both into a Color > MixRGB node set to Multiply. Send the MixRGB's Color output into the Diffuse BSDF's Color input. There is also a second way to use an AO map. "eppo" recommends good ways to use AO maps here, saying the following. Something tells me you knew all of this, ...


2

Solution from this video (but result tweaked for PBR roughness): https://youtu.be/MAecwsiu1xk To generate a procedural roughness map you will first need to use a PBR shader, you will need the Principled BSDF shader in Blender 2.79, older versions don't have it. Also you will need an HDRI texture to see the result, you can find free HDRI online. The Metal ...


2

Yes - and no. For most 'real world' materials, the Principled shader should be able to produce very good results. However, it is not perfect and cannot deal with every situation - otherwise it would have far more parameters, inputs and sliders than would be practical. The existing principled shader should be fine for pretty much all 'simple' materials - ...


2

1) What's wrong with my nodes? There is no real reason to solely use a Diffuse shader. Virtually all materials have gloss, so you should either mix a diffuse and a gloss or use Principled BSDF. 2) How to hook displacement into nodes? Turn on the Experimental feature set (can be found under the "Render" button). Go to your material settings and under "...


2

You're doing good to use the PBR node inside Blendere but include the textures (make them internal), then save the .blend file. THEN export to .GLB, it should work. Relative path issues mess the drag-drop on Facebook post.


2

Smoothness is the opposite of roughness. If you have a smoothness map you can use the "Invert" node to plug it into a roughness input. You can find it under (shift+ a) Add -> Color -> Invert. For example:


2

Baking in Blender Baking in Blender means baking the lighting information to texture maps, not the properties of the Principled shaders like roughness. You can bake AO and normals, but as far as I know, currently Blender Cycles only bakes normals from geometry and combining bump maps into a normal map or a few normal maps into one will not work correctly. ...


2

You can use Disney Shader in LuxCore Render Engine with PBR textures. Connect Albedo multiplied by Ambient Occlusion (if any) in Disney Material Base Color. Normal map in Bump socket (Checking Normal map tick box). Roughness and Metallic in their corresponding sockets. See Displacement note below. Things to check: Base Color is the Albedo multiply by ...


2

Plug the metallic input into the roughness input of the principled shader and then bake the roughness map (texture) of the texture plugged in. I hope it will work...


2

You don't need the height map for this.. the normal map will work fine (make sure to add the vector Normal Map and make the image texture non-color). The RMA works like this.. add the RMA image texture and then add a "Separate RGB" node. Each channel in the RMA is an input into your BSDF shader. Most of the time it's this... Red = Ambient Occlusion (you ...


1

You can get the same functionality with the Color Ramp node. Add > Converter > Color Ramp And because the Color Ramp node uses 0-1 value range, just multiply your value by 1 / 255. Like this: You can technically also do this with RGB curves, they're just a different tool for doing the same thing.


1

You don't need to specify the Uv channel if there is only one per object, so leave that empty. Also remember to connect your mapping node to the vector input of each of your texture nodes.


1

Here's an answer Reddit user Mcurt posted on the Blender sub: "There are a lot of factors that determine what tool/workflow is the best for texturing. If you're mostly just using PBR texture maps online, there are a bunch of other sites besides Poliigon that offer free textures. I rarely use Poliigon anymore because they don't have free textures, or at ...


1

You should rather watch vidoes and try to create your own library so that u can learn as well. I would suggest you to watch videso from blender guru (https://youtu.be/V3wghbZ-Vh4) and remington graphics (https://youtu.be/OulP6f-aF-c). You can learn from these videos and create your own shaders. If not then i think remington has provided the shader pack for ...


1

The normal map is ok, it only changes the light reflections according to the faked angle of incidence, but it actually doesn't move any vertex of the mesh. Maybe what you are looking for is a displacement effect: you can subdivide your mesh (the more subdivided, better the result but heavier the mesh) and add a displace modifier, using your specular map as ...


1

Just add mix rgb (screen) node to your roughnes map and connect surface imperfection map to the second socket


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible