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80

For a quick and simple answer, select the object that will be connected (child object) first, then select the object that will transfer transformation data to the child object (parent object). The selection order is important, the parent object must be selected last so that it is the active object. Now press CtrlP > Object. There are many ways to parent ...


29

Method 1: Select the parent object, then Shift G > Children. Or, if you want to select all children at the same level, you can first select one child, then choose Slibings in the same menu. Method 2: Go to Outliner, Ctrl LMB on the parent object icon, which will select all children and itself, then Shift LMB on it again to deselect the parent. Method 3:...


18

For a better scene organization I'd suggest use the layer management addon, which is shipped with blender by default: In addition, the Outliner provides some functionality to display the desired data types like Groups, Same Objects, Selected Objects etc.:


18

You can parent an object to a specific bone using a 'Child Of' constraint: Here, the object I want to parent to an individual bone has a 'Child Of' constraint added, with the armature and bone I want it to follow selected from the 'Target' and 'Bone' search boxes. Pressing the 'Set Inverse' button may be required to return the object to it's original ...


15

Avoid all the dancing around using bpy.ops and that setting selection and active. Most of those bpy.ops commands are meant to be called by the UI once a user clicks a ' parent to x ' button , etc. You are on the right path by using the .parent attribute. All you really need are the names or references to the objects and you can parent much, much simpler. ...


12

You can hide that in display tab by deselecting Relationship Lines. Press N while in 3D-view, then uncheck the option in "Display":


11

To point a light to an object use a "Track to" constraint. Set the target to the object you want. Set To= -Z Up = Y Now the light will always point to the target object.


9

This can be done fairly quickly; what you need to do is and an empty to the location of the child, and then make the child copy the location of the empty, using a constraint — now you can safely parent both objects and the child won't move. You can do this by: While in Edit mode, and with the child selected, pressing Shift + S > Cursor to selected ...


9

For bones that you don't want to deform the mesh, uncheck deform in the Deform Panel of bone properties.


9

Given the fact that there are more than seven billion people out there, it approaches certainty that many might share a similar view, even among the Blender community right now. Personally I never saw this as a two way street until you brought it up. I have never seen the word used in that particular manner outside 3D. Turn B into A's parent would be more ...


7

If the child object moves after setting the parent, use the following to move it back: # After both parent and child have been link()ed to the scene: childObject.parent = parentObject childObject.matrix_parent_inverse = parentObject.matrix_world.inverted() To unparent and keep the child object location (without using operators): parented_wm = childObject....


7

Select the child object, and in the 3D View header, go to Object > Animation > Bake Action. In the pop-up dialogue, enable Clear Parents, then hit OK.


7

Select the children and then press Alt+P, where 3 options will be presented in a popup menu. The option to Clear and Keep Transform will clear the parent of the children and allow them to keep their current scale, position, and rotation.


7

This is one of the main purposes of the "child of" constraint. It's a constraint the transforms an object as though it was parented to the specified target. Like all constraints, you can keyframe the influence: By default it will move the object to the target's location as well. Clicking "set inverse" will add an offset so the constrained object will "start"...


6

If you want a bone to have a parent bone you have to do the parenting while in 'Edit Mode'. At the minute you are in 'Object Mode'. From the header of the 3D view, with the armature selected, choose 'Edit Mode': (The bone you want to be the parent will also have to be in the same armature for it to be available as the parent).


6

Select the object and the armature in this order; mesh, then armature. The armature must be the active object to get the options you are looking for. You have the mesh as the active object. (lighter orange color is the active object)


6

If you link in an object from an external file you can't move it by default, even if you parent it to a local object. In this case the selected object should be highlighted in blue unless you alter the theme colours. You can make a proxy or make a local copy to move it, or move it in the original file. A linked object will have a small file icon next to it ...


6

there are 3 things you can do manually, both in properties panel : Remove the armature modifier (click the 'X') remove the parent manually in object properties (click the 'X') remove the armature related vertex group in object data tab (select a group and click the '-' button)


6

I think it is usually done to allow you to later swap the parented model with another one (maybe you start with a low-res then later switch to a hi-res), so that you don't loose the animation keyframes, because they're assigned to the empty, not to the model. Otherwise, deleting the "old" model, you'll loose all its animation keyframes, and you would need ...


6

The Outliner is designed to be able to display a 'heirarchy' of information, that is, data that belongs to other data, including parent/child relationships. To expand the Outliner heirarchy press the '+' (which changes to a '-' when clicked) next to the parent object: You now have access to the selection, render and viewport visibility properties of the ...


6

You can read this information in the properties panel, Relations tab.


6

Child-Parent relations are displayed when the Outliner is in the Scenes mode. This can be selected from the header: A convincing and efficient way of showing simultaneously Collection hierarchies and Parenting hierarchies has been looked for, but hasn't been found yet. I'd say that this is still likely to change before the Beta becomes Stable.


5

You can use b.parent = a but you can of course use : bpy.ops.object.parent_set() I made a little code for this: import bpy a = bpy.data.objects['Cube'] b = bpy.data.objects['Cube.001'] bpy.ops.object.select_all(action='DESELECT') #deselect all object a.select = True b.select = True #select the object for the 'parenting' bpy.context.scene.objects....


5

This is just not how modifiers are intended to work. Perhaps it's just me, but I never thought of modifiers being applied to child objects. Indeed, this would seem rather strange to me. But why? Modifiers are another kind of datablock which can be added to objects, much like materials or constraints. Yet neither materials or constraints are applied to ...


5

I asked around and a user JA12 on #blender irc channel suggested me the following: Open up the source scene, select the parent object in the Outliner with Ctrl+Left Click, that will select all levels of children as well Use Ctrl+C (Copy) while those objects are selected, that will copy the selection to the buffer Close the source scene and open up the ...


5

This can be done with the Hook modifier. To hook vertices from "object A" to "object B", first assign all vertices of object A which you want to "follow" object B to a vertex group. Then add a hook modifier to object A and select the vertex group you have created and object B in their respective boxes on the modifier.


5

Combine desired vertices into Vertex Group Add a Child Of constraint to the bone Set this Vertex Group as a target in constraint settings


4

if you select two objects, you can hook a vertex from the last selected (after entering edit mode) to "selected object", ie to the last object selected (to its origin). You could move the origin to a vertex in this last object... but it's not ideal Or, you can do this, perhaps better: from the object 1 (the one that has the vertex you wish to pin to), ...


4

When animating a character they may need to pick up objects and move them around. The ChildOf constraint is useful for this. The advantage of using the ChildOf constraint is that you can animate the influence to allow the character to pick up and put down the object. As you can specify an armature and bone to parent to you can also parent different object ...


4

You can watch and track any Dependency graph bugs here: developer.blender.org > Dependency graph All of the tickets look resolved now. There are no disadvantages that I know of. However you never know if somewhere is a bug or not before you test it. If you work in a production environment you probably already test everything before you use it. If your ...


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