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1

Hi! Please follow these steps STEP 1 I changed the lighting of the mesh to matcap and chose a charcoal black colour so we can spot the bad shading easily.Then I tweaked the geometry of a few faces by deleted them and reconstructing them. STEP 2 Then I added and deleted some edge loops, added the subdivision surface modifier and then increased the levels of ...


7

The other answers are correct: the difference is that the smooth cube reflects a large contiguous area of the room, while the flat cube reflects three small isolated areas of the room. Since a small image stretched over an area looks blurrier than a large image stretched over the same area, the flat cube looks blurrier than the smooth one. This answer only ...


11

It's an optical illusion. Actually, the flat-shaded cube has a reflection which is more clear and more detailed. But why doesn't the flat-shaded cube look detailed? It's because the flat-shaded cube reflects only a very small portion (or, rather, 3 very small portions) of the surrounding room. The portions of the room which are reflected are so small that ...


1

You need to switch the normal Image Texure to Non-Color: Other than that, check your UV Editor, the UV maps of the right and left sides of your objects are overlapping, it makes the texture mirror on the surface of your object.


3

MeshLoop.normal As commented by @scurest After using ob.data.calc_normals_split() you access the normals with loop.normal. What error message are you getting? Make sure you are in object mode and not edit mode when you run the script. Look at the loop normal, rather than the vertex normal to get the custom split normal values. Test script, using foreach ...


10

The built-in HDRI images are fairly low resolution, in addition, there is some blur added by default. Finally, your image shows the flat-shaded square pointing at the curtains, which are blurry from light bleed anyway. As I said in a comment, CAUTION: Objects in mirror are closer than they appear! A smooth shaded surface behaves like a convex-mirror, while a ...


8

When using an HDRI the light is coming into the scene from infinitely far away. This means when looking at the flat shaded cube it will reflect only a tiny portion of the background. The smooth shaded cube's interpolated normals are gathering light from a very wide arc and reflecting it to the camera, and that's why you can see practically the entire room. ...


1

Here is a workaround that will do the job in some cases: Instead of multiple Viewer nodes use a single Viewer node and a switch to change the image input that the Viewer gets. For Example: Old system with multiple Viewer nodes: New system with one Viewer node and a switch: The switch can be toggled in python using the following command: bpy.context.scene....


5

The valleys and flat areas where things grow can be identified by a combination of the normal and the curvature of the mesh. Geometry Nodes can distribute plants to follow this pattern. For example, given this geometry: The terrain normal in the Z direction is: The curvature for the terrain is: Details for Blender 2.93.4 Enable the Tissue add-on. Select ...


3

Well I just figured it out, it took me some time to notice this mistake and I am not even sure how this thing was created.. but look at the top part of your UV: Do you see something strange? Look closer to that black spot at the top: If you take that small hidden UV and scale it over the old one: For some reason you had 2 UV maps, 1 for inside and 1 for ...


2

There are Face Normals, Split Normals, and Vertex Normals. Like the Face Normals, the Split Normals affect the shading of an object. They are important for hard-surface modeling, and can solve but also introduce problems. Split Normals Data can exist on imported objects or can be created by the two modifiers: Normal Edit and Weighted Normal when the ...


0

Usually normals simply point to the direction perpendicular to the face. It tells how light should behave when hitting that surface. Smooth shading works by creating a smooth gradient between the normals. More info here. Custom normals allow you to bend the rules, e.g. stylized look like shown here. It is unclear to me how you got custom normals on your ...


0

Okay I got the answer when I redid the entire project. Basically I had slightly modified the high poly mesh which had messed up the baked normal texture. But when I redid the entire thing it turned out okay.


2

I went through the linked source code for the normal map node, and came up with this: This is giving me the same behavior as the Normal Map node set on Tangent Space, but has the Normal and Tangent exposed as sockets. Proper use is to input the mesh's Normals from a Geometry node, and a Tangent from the Tangent node with the UV map that matches the color ...


1

The problem is in the way you're selecting the two objects. Do your step 1. Do not do your step 2. Do step 3 in the usual way for selecting an object, by left clicking on it. Do step 4 by holding Shift while left clicking on it. Do step 5 Do step 6


5

The normals at the vertices are indeed averaged, so they point directly away from the origin, just like a sphere. So you can think of the cube as a really low-poly approximation of a sphere. When a light hits a true sphere, it divides it into two hemispheres, a "bright" side that faces the light, and a "dark" side that faces away from ...


2

It is an artifact of both the lighting model being used and what 'smooth shading' means. You appear to be in object mode, which, by default uses Studio lighting, which is described in my answer to this question. Smooth shading fakes the normals of an object by adjusting the normals near the edges to sort of average out the angle. Blender actually uses ...


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