New answers tagged

0

If, for rigging or some other reason, it's inconvenient to place the origins of the parts in the same place, you can put the fur's gradient in the Object Space of the arm . Select Object texture coordinates, as you have done, but select the arm in the 'Object' dropdown at the bottom of the node, to tell it which object (as opposed to the default 'this ...


2

I found out what I needed not even ten minutes later lol. What I did was set the origin points in the same places of objects I wanted to have a shared gradient, and where exactly it was set would be the start of a gradient. Then I used the "Object" output from the Texture Coordinate node instead of "generated" in my setup to actually ...


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Very strange. I was the one who asked this question, but my account doesn't say I asked it and I cannot comment on the Ron Jensen comment chain. The solution to my problem was that I was using blender 2.8 and updating to 2.83 LTS changed the node from Undefined and back to Mapping.


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Depending on the direction of your UV mapping, you might have to switch X and Y in this kind of set-up, which follows your modulo + color-ramp method as far as possible: Any other method which makes the Less-Than threshold depend on a dimension orthogonal to the one whose modulo is taken will do the same. This tree also makes the period, base, and ...


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Use a gradient texture in Radial Mode. Same idea with the wave texture:


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Well, this is one object, shape-keyed, but it has to have 2 materials, because at its fullest expansion, the inner cube has the same dimensions as the outer, so it would take a more elaborate node-tree to discriminate between them. The inner cube has this material: The maximum X,Y,Z in Object space gives the 'box-distance' to its surfaces. The outer cube ...


2

The geometry node does what you want. The geometry node looks like this: And has a vector output for position. The separate xyz node can be connected to that and it'll isolate the z component of the vector. Then you can use a math node set to greater than and a couple of mixRGB nodes to combine colors. What's a vector and why does this work? Vectors are ...


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The Emission from your "glass" is interfering, among other things. I've found one of the most practical ways to produce "glass" in eevee, is through the node setup below:


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go to compositing. turn on show nodes. press shift+A. search hue. it will come up.


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If you want use this model in a new blender file, save the file with this model. Open the new blender file that you want to import it into. Select File then select append, navigate to the old file where your model is, double click on the file name and go into objects, select your model/object name and then press the append button and your object should be ...


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You can do this with a Vector Math node. Start with the horizontal band texture that you want to warp (I used a wave texture cut with a ColorRamp as an example). Pick another texture to use as a "warp factor". I used a wave texture set on the Y axis. I didn't use a ColorRamp, because the natural gradient of the texture will help make the wave &...


1

Simple rotation works in some cases too. Rotate texture arround X or Y axis with some distance can give you an illusion of vertical texture movement. Texture rotated 360 does the trick - loop animation. add Empty a bit far from Cube location on X axis (in this example 7m) frame 0 - add keyframe Rotation zero for Empty on Y axis frame 250 - add keyframe ...


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Duarte Farrajota Ramos really deserves credit for this, but the solution is as follows: In the UV Editing workspace, select mesh in Object mode. Switch to Edit mode and select all vertices in the mesh (A). Press U to unwrap mesh. (If it has already been incorrectly unwrapped, delete the existing UVMap from the Object Data Properties, one of the tabs in the ...


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After I searched on internet and played around the nodes material. This is how I achieved the embossed effect with Bump node, I still cannot master the concept but it just works.


4

Eevee has its limitations, thankfully there is an easy solution: Shift + A -> Light Probe -> Reflection Plane Move and scale the Reflection Plane to fit the mirrored surface Center the Reflection Plane on the mirror, then nudge it forward slightly That's it. Enjoy!


2

Try using a wave generator set to use the Z axis of the object to power your color ramp. I was able to get the following result by creating a curve, converting it to a mesh, and using the following node setup: I've also used a Vector Math node to offset the pattern start, else the pink takes up more than it's fair share. Try adjusting the OFFSET input, as ...


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Check your Outliner, or press AltH to unhide everything, you have a plane that is hidden in Viewport but not in Render, and it makes a big shadow on your scene. Here you can see how the hidden plane is interfering with the light:


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Feature Output determines which points are used to calculate the distance. It's the one with F1, F2... values. Keep in mind that Voronoi Texture node have changed somewhat between 2.8 and 2.83.


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It is possible that your node wrangler is not activated. For that, go to Preferences (under Edit) >> add-ons >> check on node wrangler if not activated. Then press Shift+Ctrl+Left click on the grey fresnel factor node (as mentioned above).


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The glare node works based on a threshold value. Meaning only the pixels that have values larger than the set value will be affected by glare/bloom/glow. Use a lower value until you get what you need. Also, keep the mix at $0$. If you set it to $-1$ you are actually cancelling the effect completely. Mix Value to control how much of the effect is added on to ...


3

I think it's rather difficult to determine a specific "settings configuration" that accurately represents 90's CGI, more of a series of tweaks, mainly in the vein of "breaking the modern rules" of shading, I think is what's needed to get the effects you want. To me, 90's era CGI is defined by several factors. The first, and most obvious ...


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For Macbook Users, it is Shift+Ctrl+LMB. Using Shift+Cmd+LMB won't work.


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Did you ever figure this out? I'm having the same problem in 2.9 whenever I use a mix shader to combine 2 principled bsdf's.


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How about that: And that's the bump map for it (made in inkscape in less than 5 minutes)


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Here, try this setup. The active factor is the "Is Camera Ray" output of a Light Path node, used as a mix factor between the glass shader setup and a Transparent BSDF. I made the glass "double-paned" in my image so you can see the light go through both layers before hitting the back wall. I also included both a Spotlight and a point light ...


0

You can actually set the settings for each individual node. Create your node: file_output_node = tree.nodes.new('CompositorNodeOutputFile') Then you can set your settings for this node by going into the format attribute. For example: file_output_node.format.file_format = "PNG" # default is "PNG" file_output_node.format.color_mode = "...


1

I think what you're looking for is a parallax effect. Although I don't know how to accomplish this in a straight World Environment shader, you can "fake" the look by using transparent spheres surrounding your scene. All that's necessary is to give the World Environment a simple starfield background, similar to the method you described, except I ...


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does it help? noise texture + color ramp + background + world output (applied to world, not a mesh)


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Based entirely on Gorgious' answer, I've put together an easy-to-use nodegroup. It's similar to Color Range selection in Photoshop. Pick a color to select Adjust the color Range Invert the colors if needed It outputs a black-and-white mask, useful as alpha or fac input.


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Sure thing. Just add a ColorRamp and increase the contrast. You can also set it to Constant (for maximum contrast) if you don't mind jagged edges.


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After some looking around, I found the solution. Since I was using only image textures and a mix shader no shadows would be created. I had to put the images through a principled bsdf node before giving it to the mix shader so shadows could be created.


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I've not been able to get an answer on this question anywhere. The closest workaround I've found is to just A -> ctrl+T and flip the curve before starting. Ended up working reasonably well.


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First, let me explain what the different texture images are: Diffuse - A normal picture of the material Albedo - The color of the material (diffuse minus shadows) Ambient Occlusion (or just AO) - The shadows of the material Displacement - A depth map of the material (white = high, dark = low) Normal - Which way the each point on the surface is facing (next ...


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You can't animate this texture mapping. (Or maybe you can with Python scripting ?) What you have to do is add a Texture Coordinate and a Mapping node before your Magic Texture node. You can then animate the fields from the Mapping node.


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Blender automatically converts old nodes when copied into newer versions. So Average becomes Add + Normalize


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I think it's gone for good, but this is what it looked like under the hood. I used two texture coordinates as proxies for the input vectors that are to be averaged. You can make this into a node group if you wish, so it's always there.


2

You can animate the timestep. A value of 0 stops the animation, higher values increase it. In this way you can change the speed at any keyframe of any particle system. The speed can be animated for every particles system setting. So you can combine particle systems with different velocity or speeds. You'll find the timestep in the particles properties at ...


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A mix shader should work just fine. Just make sure to use the same alpha factor that you used for the "burn mask".


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You can combine them with mix rgb node or a mix shader node, for this task I'll reccomend you to use mix shader node just plug both the colors/textures in a principal or shader you think is more preferable and combine them, now for the next part you can use a gradient texture with mapping node and object coordinates and plug it into the factor input( you may ...


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In your picture, lights look like point. try with out lights and change the color of cubes: picture 1 secondly, add black ground with a material with many roughness: picture 2 And play with cube's nodes according to me it's the only solution.


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I solved this for myself after a bit more fiddling around. I'm not quite sure what I was doing wrong, but I figured I'd post this for others, because it's somewhat simpler than the setup in the linked question.


3

Perhaps you changed where that HDRI file was, reloading it may solve the problem, either that or you disconected a node somewhere.


2

Sorry, when I posted an image before, I forgot to connect the bump node. It really shouldn't change that much though, The only thing I can think is the subsurface color is interfering. I'll post the setup once again (without subsurface color) to show the setup that works for me. You can add subsurface after and see if that's the problem (if you also used 2 ...


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Connect a texture to the bump. Either a normal map into the normal input or a texture (such as noise) into the height input. Then control the strength with the distance and the strength values.


0

Managed to get rid of the lines by decimating the donut again until the I got a more basic mesh of the donut and then re-applying the subdivide modifier.


1

You can use another texture to mix color with your emission texture map: See the Checker texture "Add" to the emission socket, make it light up as the checker go white. That node is Color→MixRGB in node editor. Photoshop is another approach if you only want a quick prototype and keep thing simple.


2

Unfortunately the rim of a Solidified mesh doesn't exist in time to be UV mapped. It has no UV map at all; any texture can only be projected through the solid from the faces that are UV mapped before solidifying, which gives no opportunity to change the colour on the way through. You have some options: Apply the Solidify modifier, and UV unwrap the whole ...


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First of all problem with the roughness raised because of the missing glossy map. To tell the truth, I don't have it :) So if you created your maps as me in photoshop and applied it as texture (Normal; Diffuse and the main one) always save it as tiff format (don't forget about compression when you save it). Other formats like png make less quality. Also, ...


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This is likely trying to add some randomness into the texture coordinates so all objects don't have a perfectly matching texture placement introducing some variation between them despite using the same texture. It takes Object texture coordinates as base then separates each axis into separate components so an arbitrary value can be subtracted to in each ...


2

Firstly, You have the texture coordinate set to UV, but the object doesn't seem to be UV unwrapped. Regardless, generated or object are the conventions for procedural textures. I also find that a wave texture works better than a gradient. Lastly, you must be in Lookdev or Rendered mode to see it.


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