17

For each cycle, make sure the support foot (one that's planted to the ground) moves back in linear speed. Use Set Keyframe Interpolation T > Linear for the support foot's first keyframe. You should also know the distance it moves back. Just Ctrl-drag (snap to increment) so the distance value is easy to reproduce, no need for guesswork. Next, move the root ...


7

I use NLA editor in blending and smoothing animation after inserting a new keyframe. So for example, if I have a bone that already has an animation, then I paused the animation at frame 100 and rotated this bone 90 around x-axis and inserted a keyframe there for rotation, when I replay the animation, you will find that the bone at frame 100 will snap and ...


7

Short answer: High-quality character animation is hard work even when it is done by experts. A lot of work goes into every second. Nonlinear animation is an attempt to speed things up, but note that it could sacrifice some quality. Longer answer: When you start animating, you can be successful using only keyframes, but after a while you find yourself ...


7

The NLA editor is used for editing the position and interaction between actions in an animation. It's main use is for managing, editing, and organizing groups of actions instead of having to deal with huge numbers of keyframes. Using the Dopesheet, an animator can create an action for an object that consists of any number of keyframes. An action for a ...


7

This is a simple addon that using the scaling principle allowed by the NLA editor. Its features: Auto-baking Works on rigid bodies Auto-alligns so it starts and ends exactly where the previous animation did Installation: Go to https://github.com/FreddieRa/BlenderAddons/blob/master/AutoReverse.py Click on "Raw" on the top left Then right click anywhere ...


5

The snowflake button is only displayed for actions not added as an NLA strip, or newly created ones. For actions already contained in a strip, it's much easier to select the strip and Tab to tweak it. After that, just Tab again to exit strip-tweaking mode. There's no need to replace existing strips: the action's change will be reflected immediately in all ...


5

Yes, this can be done, using the API call View2D.view_to_region. Heres a "hello world" example, drawing Hello World under the active strip. import bpy import bgl import blf def draw_callback_px(self, context): print("mouse points", len(self.mouse_path)) region = context.region strip = context.scene.sequence_editor.active_strip if strip is ...


4

Oh dear, I feel kind of stupid but also so glad I worked it out. So this is the setup that works. Action 1: walk - in-place walk cycle Action 2: moveForward - moving the root bone in time with the feet to avoid slipping. F-Curve modifier set to repeat with offset. Convert both animated actions to action strips on the NLA editor. Here's where I was going ...


4

In the VSE, the "multiply speed" value of a "Speed" effect strip can't be animated. You'll have to : uncheck the "Stretch to input strip length" box, check the "Use as speed" box, set the "Speed Factor" value to 1 (so the video will be played at normal speed) animate this value as you need: greater than 1, playback will be faster, between 0 and 1 the ...


4

The relevant setting is Blend In/Out. To ignore keyframes in strips below the active one, turn off Auto Blend In/Out, and set both blend values to 0: More generally I suggest, for bones that will be animated in a layer, to avoid keyframing it in strip actions in all other layers. Or do it in such a way that the strips don't overlap. That'd save you some ...


4

This behavior has been changed after 2.66a. Just tried to discuss with the designer. As explained, it is one of the main ways to prepare some places to add NLA strips from pre-made actions, and got its advantages, too. To make them invisible, click the third toggle on the header to exclude them from displaying.


4

If the walk cycle is the only thing you want in your animation, you could just make the timeline the same length as the walk cycle. It'll loop automatically. Otherwise, if the walk cycle is in your timeline, you can go to the NLA editor with the rig selected (in object mode), and click on the double-down-arrow icon, which will save the walk cycle as an ...


4

The action editor that you are using only shows a subset of keyframed values, to see all available keyed data you need to use the full dopesheet or the graph editor. If the values you are looking for are still not visible then check the options in the header that filter the displayed items. EDIT: An action is basically a container for animation data that ...


3

To select a single "curve" in the graph editor, select a point and hover over it and hit L to select all the points, hit A. To select an area of points, hit B and use the box select tool.


3

Position your cursor over the track in the NLA editor and hit TAB. This will enable the editing mode for that NLA track (it should turn green). If you have an F-curve editor open at the same time, the animation curve for the NLA track will appear in it a allow editing. (Ensure that the 'Only include channels relating to selected objects and data' option ...


3

If your action contain some keyframes on the "root" bone's channel, all items you assign this action will be mandatorily aligned. You should remove the root bone's keyframes from the action, and then animate the roots separately. If needed, you can create separate actions, one per character, and mix them with the first action.


3

Actually you can't add a transition to fill a gap. If you want to interpolate 2 strips they have to overlap, therefore you have to change the speed of your action or add more "action" to your strips. Speed Select the strip In the Properties Panel (P) > Action Clip, increase the Scale value of Playback Settings Extrapolation To extend a strip, you could ...


3

Looking at 1. to render each strip into it's own folder we can make a list of each nla strip, here I store the mute setting to restore later and mute each strip as we go through. Then loop through our list of strips and render the frame range of each one, by setting the render.filepath here each strip can go into it's own folder. To also achieve 2. you ...


3

The nonselected actions are muted when editing the selected action. Try switching out of edit mode. Similarly, if the NLA stack is muted when editing the action, the NLA Track below it will be edited with solo enabled. If switching between NLA Tracks, the solo status for the previous track will be transferred to the new track. If you've already ...


3

Open the NLA editor Select the strip you want to make longer Open the properties panel with the N key Go to the Action Strip tab Enable the Sync Length checkbox - this will make the strip longer if you tweak it, making the underlying action longer.


2

I don't know if you have solved your problem, but, I had the same situation of your. I would like to offset the entire linked objects animation, but it don't appear in the NLA panel without make proxies. In my case, my rosource file has more than 50 animated objects, it's impracticable to make proxies of each one and then offset each nla strip. My ...


2

I liked Mutant Bob's suggestion but since it's still early in production, I wanted to maintain a link to the original file so that when I texture it and add more practical effects to it, the master scene will update with those changes. The solution I came up with isn't perfect and might have unintended side effects, but it achieves my basic goals Using Pablo ...


2

My first instinct is that you're going to have to "make local" on the object. At that point you can add an NLA track and a strip referencing the relevant action. Once it is an NLA strip you can control how much of the source action's timeline is used, and what its time extents in the scene will be. If the freshly-local object already has actions and NLAs, ...


2

You can get the active NLA track, but the strips array has no property .active in the Python API. It's not exposed, but the active strip is known in the C code (note that the Active Strip panel is hardcoded). All you can do with Python is to get all selected strips: try: selected_strips = [strip for strip in bpy.context.object.animation_data....


2

When you add keyframes they are stored in an Action to let them repeat add the action as an Action Strip to the NLA Editor and set the repeat property (in the property panel N) to the number of repetitions. Note that the Action Editor is mode of the Dopesheet Editor.


2

I'm far from experienced with animation, but as you've not had an answer yet; I'll try to help. In the images you provide I cannot see a root bone for your rig, a root bone should not be keyframed at all in your walk cycle, and should be the parent of your armature. When you translate your walk cycle into your animation, it should be keyframes on the root ...


2

I created a .blend file start with the default cube. I gave it a relative shape key and shrunk one of the faces. I then added keyframes at 1 and 31 with influence 0 and 1.0 respectively. That makes the face shrink over time. I then duplicated the cube with alt-d. Since both cubes have the same mesh, the action is on both of them. I made a single-user ...


2

When editing the walkcycle action alone (file has the same issue as in this question) you haven't properly keyframed the IK-arms. In the timeline set the VisualLocRot as keying-set: Go to the keyframes in IK mode and place the hands where you want them to be. Thereafter you can switch seamlessly between IK and FK mode.


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