6

Try to start with more simplified geometry connected without n-gons. Start with 10 sided Circle and continue extrude, scale, as needed) Use Subdivision Surface modifier to round curved parts and Edge Crease Shift+E 1 to keep corners sharp. Similar to this. Note: I probably used too low topology, when I would like to bevel edges now, I would have to add ...


5

You could do the other way around, beginning with the shape then extrude to get your rectangular object, at the end when you'll give it the Subdivision Surface modifier it will just need a bit of work to get the sharp angles:


4

You could try something like this (bump mapped material option). I just used a couple of noise textures mixed together to make a randomly patchy surface. I used a mapping node to stretch (scale) it a bit to make it longer like grass. I used the mix as the basis for a bump map. The reason I ran them through a MixRGB mixed with white first, is to soften the ...


3

Bevel will add bevel to all edges if not limited. So to keep flatter parts untouched, limit it to "angle".


2

Upload the model to sketchfab. The model can then be viewed and rotated as a 3d object with no special software, on a web browser.


2

Have you tried to tilt the vertices? Select your curve, go in Edit mode, select the vertices you want, and CtrlT to tilt, or use the N panel:


2

To do that: Simply use two spheres: One for the body ShiftA then mesh>UV sphere Then create a second one at the same place, and keep only the edges that make the ring Select the other one and delete them. Delete this: And scale it a bit S to avoid the two spheres to overlap.


2

This is standard subdivision surface modeling. The very general idea is that you create a base mesh that is comprised of very simple geometry, and then add a subdivision surface modifier to increase the amount of detail or mesh density. In your screenshot, the "few selected dots" is the low poly base mesh. The part that has "so many vertices ...


1

While Subdivision modelling is generally the recommended approach, if you already HAVE a complex, high resolution geometry here are two approaches you could take. The longer method is to manually build a low poly mesh approximating the form of the high poly one using retopology or other ways to stick the low poly form onto the right places. A quicker method ...


1

The problem was blend mode , the blend mode was set to alpha blend , when i changed it to alpha hashed , it got solved


1

You can for instance use a solidify modifier set to vertex group, then paint the weights in weight paint mode. First add a vertex group and in edit mode make sure to remove every weight from your vertices. Then add a solidify modifier to your mesh, set the factor to something > 0 so there is at least a bit of displacement with a weight 0. Then go into ...


1

The principle is to use two "simple deform" modifiers: one animated from a circle, bent -360°, (for the torus) to a half circle, bent 180°, for the sphere the second to bend around the previous by 360° to give it the volume (torus or sphere) The base grid is parallel to front view and centered to avoid the usage of empties in the bend modifiers. ...


1

I've reworked your topology to get a more clean bevel, Try this: By adding a little bit of thickness to the back face, you can allow more room for the bevel to run before it overshoots. But keep in mind there will always be artifacts if you push the bevel too far on any kind of geometry. If you want a thicker bevel and more control over the mesh, you can ...


1

After viewing your model, here's what I did: #select the meshes then ctrl+A to apply all transformation. #select the object go to edit mode and select all the vertex by pressing A once or twice. And then shift+N to recalculate normals. Your mesh had some flipped normals which caused the issue you marked. Here's the File after applying the fixes I mentioned.


1

Inside the shirt, there is a Ngon that breaks the flow of the edge loops, so your vertical Seam fails to "cut" the model in two halves : A quick fix would be to add a Seam along on side of this Ngon : It would also be a good idea to add a Seam inside the arm, same position as outside : For your future models, i would suggest avoiding unnecessary ...


1

Select the edges you want to split. Press V to split them and move them away slightly. Then repeat for the back of the leg. Join two edges by selecting them and pressing F. Fill in the rest of the faces by selecting the end edge and pressing F multiple times. Then you can add more edge loops with Ctrl+R and with the "Loop Tools" addon enabled, ...


1

I know it's been couple of months but still some one might find this helpful. I've been struggling with the same problem - didn't know how to flip an object along world global axis so that object might keep it's local origin orientation, just "look" to the opposite side, say from global X axis. What I came up with is I keep a parent cube at world 0....


1

None of the above works for me in blender 2.90.1. When I press Alt, the bottom of the window indicates that I should left click to loop select, but when I click, nothing happens. Alt+Doubleclick = nothing, Alt+Shift+Doubleclick = nothing, Shift+Alt+Left Click = nothing. It turns out it's my operating system (Linux Mint) that uses the Alt key for window ...


1

To enable this behavior in Blender 2.91, you need to select Scale under the Affect section of the Snap to popup:


1

Even I am new to blender and was facing the same issue, what helped me was as follows: Go to Object Mode->Select the armature->Press N->Click on Tool->Expand Options->Expand Transform->Affect Only-> Select Origin. Then you will be able to move the origin in the viewport. Hope that helps.


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