29

If you're using array modifiers and therefore have just one object, then use Texture Coordinate node like so: Now use "Separate XYZ" and "Math: Less Than" nodes to discover the width of your setup: (of course you could calculate it instead) Repeat the same for the y coordinate. Put reciprocals of found values in the scale of the "...


28

This can be done by quantizing the x and y generated coordinates and combining them to get a unique value in $[0, 1)$ for each pixel. Then it's just a matter of creating a falloff for the scan lines. Create Pixel Indices The y coordinates have been inverted by the subtract node so that the scan lines will start at the top. Here I have created a plane with a $...


25

You can get there using a brick and noise textures. Use a Brick texture for the randomly colored tiles Use a Noise texture to 'mess up' the edges Done.


24

Enable addon Extra Objects Add Object Shift+A > Mesh > Extras > Honeycomb in desired amount of cels setuped in properties panel (left-bottom corner of 3Dview) with max Edge Width that fills cells with central vertex Duplicate Shift+D and Separate Ctrl+P one cell, add Solidify modifier Parent to Honeycomb Ctrl+P for Honeycomb object enable under ...


17

This is the best I could do: Feel free to mess around with the sliders. You can customize the hole in the middle, and the cracks' thickness and size.


15

Just to add to Moonboot's nice answer. ColorRamp can actually create the whole HSV spectrum for you :). Set both sliders to Red Set ColorRamp to HSV > Far Done


15

I would solve the problem with microdisplacement. I think you're in the ballpark. My model is a cube that I scaled down on the Z axis and gave some loop cuts to. Then I grabbed the top and bottom outer edge (in edge select mode) and beveled with a couple divisions. And that's it, slap some adaptive subdivision on there and head to the node editor. Set ...


15

A pure-shader option, for use on a simple plane, or any surface: The top branch wraps the circumference into segments, using a Gradient > Radial node. The wrap is controlled by 'n Spokes' input. The middle-ish branch wraps the radius into rings, by length from the object origin. The wrap is controlled by 'n Rings' input. There are quite a few '...


14

You can do it this way: Texture Coordinate (Object output) > Mapping > Gradient Texture (Radial mode) > ColorRamp (that begins and ends with the same color) > Emission > Material Output. To make the color spin, use the Mapping Z Rotation value:


14

All you need is the Principled Volume shader. Create a volumetric cube Give the volume a very light color, and use Density to control it Use real units for light intensity (lumens). Related answer: Simulating a 40W Light Bulb. Lights: 10 million lumens (a really strong searchlight), Density: 0.1, Samples: 2000 + Denoiser


13

Cycles You can use parameter Random per Island "A random value for each connected component (island) of the mesh. It is useful to add variations to meshes composed of separated units like tree leaves, wood planks, or curves of multiple splines." BTW For "rainbow" ColorRamp you can set just a two colors (Red-Blue) with HSL > Clockwise. ...


13

Most of the information needed is already on this site. Just to make your job a bit easier, here is how to make a cucumber slice. Add a cylinder Find a photo of a cucumber slice and a photo of a cucumber peel Create and assign two materials (Add different materials to different parts of a mesh?) Done.


13

It sounds like you probably have your material’s Blend Mode set to Alpha Clip: The Alpha Clip blend mode is controlled by the Clip Threshold setting, which defaults to 0.5. This means that wherever your material’s opacity is below 0.5, it will render as fully transparent, and wherever it’s above 0.5, it will render as fully opaque. This clearly isn’t what ...


13

I guess there has to be a shader approach, although I think @vklidu's answer is maybe more practical? It's always tricky trying to reproduce an effect that someone else has more than likely reached by random walk :) This uses the hex-grid cluster discussed at the bottom of this answer. It yields a hexagonal tiling of the UV space, with a (-0.5 to 0.5) UV-per-...


13

I would approach it something like this: I would start by using the Position output of a Voronoi Texture with the randomness set to 0 as the Vector input of a White Noise Texture. The reason for this is that by default, White Noise Texture is infinitely zoomable, and using the Voronoi Position allows you to scale it (to make larger tiles). I wanted to use ...


13

Instead of using Voronoi Textures, use Noise Textures (more randomly shaped) of several different scales, clamped with ColorRamps to make the dimples of different sizes. Mix that with a sort of neutral grey to "soften it" slightly. Mix the end result very slightly with another Noise Texture to make the whole surface bumpy like rock. Use the mix ...


13

Maybe try a Noise plugged into a ColorRamp plugged into a Diffuse, mix it with a Glossy with a Layer Weight as factor, give both the Diffuse and the Glossy a bit of Noise as Bump:


12

Try using a Wave Texture as the scale factor for a Noise Texture: You can change the detail or distortion levels of the Wave Texture or the Noise Texture (or both) for interesting effects:


12

Here is a try for Eevee (a bit less al dente than your picture though), I guess the settings would be different for Cycles, and probably easier to find. Use a Principled BSDF with a bit of Subsurface Scattering (don't forget to tweak the Subsurface Radius values), Specular at 1, a medium Roughness, and a bit of Noise Texture in order to have a bit of grainy ...


12

edit subsurface radius. this is the most overlooked sss settings in blender. do note that before that you need to apply scale on model to get same results on every model that has this values.


12

A little bit ashamed of this answer now that I've seen the simpler setup, but maybe someone will find it useful... Shader solution Strategy: snap the coordinates to the nearest hex and then apply the usual magic (some kind of animated gradient) to color / normal / displacement Know your enemy A regular hexagon is made of 6 equilateral triangles, which means ...


11

(This answer revised thanks to @lemon pointing out what should have been obvious..) If you're prepared to use OSL, (and therefore the CPU for rendering,) this script might be a tool to add to your box. By tracing back down the incoming ray to a light, it returns information about the object being lit. It's not all used in this example, but might be useful ...


11

You have set the luminosity to a low level. Bring it up. The circle is to set hue and saturation. The strip to the right is to set luminosity. Alternatively use the sliders for the different color channels. Or use the Mouse Wheel to adjust luminosity. To reset the color wheel to default press the ⟵ Backspace


11

You could create a row of icospheres (or simply circles), with an Array modifier on X, then a second Array on Y: Give it a Simple Deform, choose the Bend option on the Z axis, with a little less than 360°: Adjust the Array count on X so that the circles don't overlap and you have the hole you want: As pointed out by Robin Betts, if you want to avoid the ...


10

Cycles Light Path > Transparent Depth Eevee Material Properties > Settings > Blend Mode > Alpha Blend Show Backface > OFF


10

Just to illustrate moonboots's comment. Use Noise texture with a Bump node. Set Bump node Distance to around 0,001 or less (1 milimeter) Done.


10

If you're ok with using a shader, something like this can be accomplished by a single Noise Texture, run through a ColorRamp to give a harsh cutoff to the tops which forms the flat sections. This is just a simple example - if you want more variation in size, you can combine different noise textures of different scales until it's more to your liking. Remember ...


10

The viewer node you are using is actually an Emission Shader. To stop the glowing, plug the Principled BSDF into the Material Output.


10

You can select all your seats and unwrap from view: Then in the UV Editor select all, enable Pivot > Individual Origin and scale down the UVs a lot (like S 0.01): You may need to move some UV islands a bit so that they don't overlap with anti-aliasing colors, or slightly move them all on X or Y until it's good. You could also scale the islands down to 0 ...


10

Quite an easy thing to do procedurally, since radial gradient is already there in the Gradient Texture node, just select Radial mode and use Object space for the centre of the texture to be at the origin of the plane.


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