10

If you're ok with using a shader, something like this can be accomplished by a single Noise Texture, run through a ColorRamp to give a harsh cutoff to the tops which forms the flat sections. This is just a simple example - if you want more variation in size, you can combine different noise textures of different scales until it's more to your liking. Remember ...


9

Just to illustrate moonboots's comment. Use Noise texture with a Bump node. Set Bump node Distance to around 0,001 or less (1 milimeter) Done.


8

Driver expression: #frame You can use drivers with #frame expression. It's basically feeding the field with the value of the curret frame. By using a multiplying factor you can set the pendency of the curve. It's also easy to edit: just right click the field or type in to override the expression.


7

Transfer Normals on Instanced Particles Theory: Currently I don't think there's an easy way to pick the value of the shaded surface of another mesh and transfer to the built in hair strand, but we can copy it's normals orientation and use the same material and transfer them to another object. We basically just neet to create a separate Object that will work ...


6

Vector Math>length seems to work well here to accomplish your goal: Click to enlarge Adding a Math> Multiply node between the length and noise texture will allow you to scale the rings as well as seen below: Result: You can take this a step further, for a little more control and use Vector Rotate to help here. The Math>Multiply is what will ...


6

If you just need to create this random circular output, you can actually just plug the gradient node's color output into a noise texture. Note: Geometry -> Position is based on actual position in the scene, so that may not be what you want to use. I'm using object coordinates here. You can control where the effect terminates by using a mapping node. By ...


6

If you're just looking for the frosted glass effect, try something like this. Basically it's just a high transmission value (for transparency/translucency) and a mid-level(ish) roughness (to make it more opaque - "frosted"). I added a bit of subsurface as well, but it's probably not needed. The "Bump Map" setup is optional too, but I just ...


6

As mentioned, if you can combine your color choices into one ramp, you can plug the Random output directly into that. To do this with this level of control, you need to do some math to convert the random output into a straight 0 or 1 over a given range. I've done this with a compare node. The bottom compare node is everything in the range of .8 to 1.0, ...


6

You could create a material that would be a mix between Voronoi (Distance to Edge mode) and Noise, with a bit of Emission in order to fake translucency: Then add a particle system with a collection of gravels. To vary the amount of each gravel, use the Use Count option:


6

Subdivide a cube, sculpt it a bit: Give it some noise and bumps: And at last create a particle system for the peanuts:


5

Bloom and emission are two completely different things. Let's talk about Eevee, since that's what you're probably using (since implementing bloom in Cycles requires the use of compositing, with behavior that depends on the precise way that you implement the bloom.) Emission just says, write this color to the screen. That's all. It doesn't get lighted/...


5

In Cycles Glare -> Fog Glow treats your scene as though there is an atmospheric volume, but acts differently than if you'd set it up manually. I'm not sure but it looks like Bloom attempts to do something similar. Here's a cube where I duplicated it, scaled it up slightly, and gave it a volume of .2 density. Cycles: And here's the Glare node by itself. ...


5

AO is rarely painted. It is likely baked from a high poly mesh to a low poly mesh. Although there's nothing wrong with doing some hand-painting on top of the bake. It is used as part of a workflow that tries to represent mesh details using texture details instead, because vertices are expensive and texture lookups aren't. For an example use case of AO, ...


4

Most textures have a detail slider, but oftentimes it's better to mix in another noise texture at a smaller scale. One of the biggest giveaways that you're looking at a rendered object is a lack of variation. Looking at the following object, it's painfully obvious it's a render. We can generate some noise to break up the base color and it gets much better. ...


4

Shamesly copied from: Automatically change the properties of multiple materials import bpy for mat in bpy.data.materials: if not mat.use_nodes: mat.specular_intensity = 0 continue for n in mat.node_tree.nodes: if n.type == 'BSDF_PRINCIPLED': n.inputs["Specular"].default_value = 0 Please refer to the ...


4

There are just three things you need to get such result: A studio lighting HDRI (like this one shipped with Blender) Shiny metallic material (Metalness=1, Roughness=0.2) Transparent background (RenderTab > Film > Transparent) Rotate the HDRI to your needs, and add white background through compositor :).


4

If you want the "smooth" areas with a pattern like in the image, you can mask some parts of your Bump Map by multiplying it with a (rotated) checker texture. You will probably have to make a lot of transformation adjustments (size, rotation, location, etc..) before it fits your project perfectly, though:


4

You could do something like this. It's just 2 Noise textures, one multiplied (to transfer the darks) and the other added (to transfer the whites), both mixed with an orange basecolor, which when combined with a high metallic value gives the cooper-ish look similar to your reference image. You can change the amount of light/dark by adjusting theColorRamps. As ...


3

Here is a file and a screen shot - I extruded my circle and then applied scale and transformation (ctrl-A) before unwrapping the mesh and choosing Follow Active Quads and Even so that they would align liek you see in the lower left. Then I made up a material to use a texture to stencil between the shaders to get emission area showing. https://drive.google....


3

I'm not super happy with this one, but when it comes down to it you might have to fiddle around with just about any solution that's given to you. It's kind of the nature of procedural generation, so here goes. This is based on another answer I did over here: Sine wave on the environment texture You can read through that for the whole discussion on this. ...


3

These lines are visible also in the original texture. So to get rid of this you would have to use some image editor to compensate it. Here I used Photoshop's Box Blur filter with range 1 px that wasn't enough so I used it twice, but you loose some details. Original Box Blur 1 px Box Blur 1 px applied twice There are probably better algorithms for ...


3

Via a script. Removing unused material slots is akin to Delete all materials that aren't assigned to a face? ie remove any slot not associated as a face material, then consolidate. Similarly to https://blender.stackexchange.com/a/7164/15543 can loop over all selected objects and run the operator for each. Copy script, paste into text editor, select the ...


2

Here is setup that works for both Eevee and Cycles and seems not too far from what you show: Put a Point light into your object, and for your material use a mix between Diffuse, Emission and Translucent node, with an Attibute node as factor that uses the Color Vertex Paint > Dirty Vertex Group in order to keep some parts more opaque:


2

You need to select the right texture from the menu in order to see it in UV editor


2

To change the color, you must use the Material Properties tab: To answer your edit, if you want the cube to have a different color than the sprinkles, you have to use different materials for the Cube and Particle Instance objects, respectively. CUBE MATERIAL PARTICLE MATERIAL (On sphere and cone) EDIT - Here is a file with the Cube, as requested:


2

Viewport display (for solid mode) and the material itself are controlled by two different settings Take a look in MaterialProperties>ViewportDisplay on the object, it could have been mixed up By the way, if on MaterialProperties>Surface the "Use Nodes" button is off, it will use Viewport Display by default


2

Scale your UVs where it is stretched, you can do this by selecting the stretched faces and then seeing what vertices are highlighted int he UV view, you then press 's' to scale and then 'x' or 'y' to scale on the axis you need, in your case it looks like the 'y' axis. That should fix it though not a real fix as you have to do it each time you edit the mesh, ...


2

You can achieve an effect like this by manipulating the normal. Here's Suzanne showing the difference with the default surface Normal and the manipulated Normal based on the vector from the origin to the surface point : By using a Normal calculated based on the origin, the reflection will always be as if it is formed on the surface of a sphere - thereby ...


2

To make an object that receives no shading, just plug the color directly into the Material Output with no shader in between. As you can see from the image, the black planet is surrounded by lights and an emission object (I put planes to show that there in fact lights there). You can see with bloom on, that there will still be some color bleed-over, but there ...


1

Check that your normals are pointing in the right direction and that your glass has 'thickness' rather than being just a single face. Reflection like that which your are seeing would indicate that the normals are pointing in the wrong direction, resulting in "total internal reflection" when light is incident at above the critical angle.


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