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5

One solution (and probably needlessly complicated) is driving the Sun rotation from the HDRI Add nodes to your HDRI Mapping node like in the second image Go Value node > RMB > Copy As New Driver and paste as Sun's Z rotation The Value node rotates both HDRI + Sun (for animating) The Add node rotates only HDRI


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Would be helpful if you can closer describe what exactly you want to achieve by this technique. If you want to affect one object by one HDRi and second object by another HDRi from World shader - you can't (from what I know). From World shader you can use more HDRi to affects different types of light rays with Light path node. That is what you mentioned ...


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Give specularity to your area and it will work fine, even though its power is a bit weak:


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Add a Light path node to World shader, then connect "Is Camera Ray" to the strength input of the Background node.


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While with regular viewport rendering alone it is hard to find a use case, while using probes it can have a visible effect. If you use an Irradiance Volume probe and bake baking indirect lighting, you use it to change object color for direct visibility, while indirect light sees it differently. In the example below the sphere color is is red, but through the ...


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Light path node (works for Eevee & Cycles)...


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To make the lights shine through the windows, make sure you have your material's Shadow Mode set away from Opaque. Alpha hashed seems to work well for most situations. The reason the Material Preview looks better is because it uses a HDRI Environment image to provide lighting and reflections. To add your own (so it appears in the render), go to the shading ...


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In 'Solid' view mode, Blender automatically lights surfaces based on their angle to the viewport. In order to see the effect of your lighting you need to switch to 'Rendered' mode which you can do by simply clicking the relevant Viewport Shading icon :


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The answer of @Christopher Bennett could be the right one, depending on what you're doing. I was unclear in the question (see edit above). The solution for me was to assign a Diffuse BSDF material to the objects with roughness=1. This way I got the effect I wanted: You can see that the object is still there (lines are not straight).


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Do you mean something like this? - just plug an RGB input into the Material output. This is what you could call "unshaded", there will be no shadows or light scattering of any kind.


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I figured it out. Go to your object properties and in Visibility>Ray Visibility, uncheck "Shadow"


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Yes, it is compatible with Blender 2.90.x. At the time of writing, this add-on will work in Blender 2.82 and later. The current version of the add-on can be found on GitHub, excluding the presets that are in the paid version.


3

Short answer Watts per square meter per steradian. See: https://devtalk.blender.org/t/cycles-unit-of-light-energy-attn-brecht/12456 Edit Below is the previous version of the answer because it is informative, even if it doesn't directly answer the question: There are many factors that determine the values of the pixels. The units are simply luminance for ...


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I know you want it in Cycles, though you can do it using Eevee: The node setting: The key point is to use "diffuse" and "shader to rgb" (the left part). This is some kind of preshading that allow to test the light intensity. This result is then tuned through a colorramp to mix between the lighted and transparent parts.


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Thanks, I had the same query. But to avoid the non linear distorsion of the edges I've found this node setup. I couldn't explain why it works though.


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You are plugging a texture node directly into the output node. You must plug the texture node into a shader node such as a Principled BSDF first in order to get the color information from the image to the output correctly. Below would be the correct setup: See this question for more information on closures. Side note, you also do not have a camera in the ...


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I found them, they were just on a separate tab (withing the right-hand bar menu) instead. Which holds these properties.


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You will have to create separate layers for each render, elements that you want to be effected separately put them in different collection. Basically you can create the whole scene and then duplicate the render layer, in one of them disable the view layer (right-click on the collection --> View Layer --> Disable from View Layer.) Do the opposite on ...


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This s not related to Version 2.9 or 2.x When you bake combined you should have a source light , or just uncheck Direct and in direct light or just bake Defuse as moonboos mentioned :)


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There is no such issue with me when i do baking :) Set render settings to default (Supported , CPU) maybe you are using Experimental for GPU . I had some Crashes when I was using Experimental for feature set I hope this helps you GL.


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Yes, this can be achieved with a Shader to RGB node. This lets you have a diffuse shader to compute which parts are lit, which you can then pass into an emission shader to make it glow. Nodes: Result: I use a color ramp to separate between the lit and unlit areas, and then feed that into a mix shader so the lit parts are shaded with the emission, and the ...


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