20

I think you could test at least 3 solutions, the classic rigging with bendy bones playing with Easing In and Out, the Stretch To constraint solution, will allow you to stretch the arm, and the Spline IK constraint solution, which is a bit more complicated but will deform more nicely. 1) CLASSIC RIGGING Create a chain of bones: upper arm, lower arm, hand, ...


16

First you will need a target bone for the Ik - for example a copy of the foot bone. Make sure this bone is not parented to anything (except when you have a root/master bone - then parent it to root/master) Now in pose mode add an IK constraint to the shin bone and setup it like in the picture. You can do this fast by selecting the target_bone first (copy of ...


10

What is Inverse Kinematics? There are two main ways to pose a chain of bones: "Forward Kinematics" (FK) is the normal way of manipulating a bone chain, based on parent-child relationships. You need to rotate each bone individually. Inverse Kinematics (IK) is another way, where the movement of the chain is determined by a "target" bone (and optionally a "...


9

One solution is to make the stretch value in BONE > INVERSE KINEMETICS > STRETCH to more than zero and not close to 1 I set it to 0.1 As seen in Pitchipoy rig set up It has to be done for each bone in the chain


9

Shapekeys Would consider using shapekeys for the handles. With two shapekeys fully flexed and fully straight. For example sake have made the rest of the mesh into shapekeys, however could use hooks or constraints to move cylinders, but what matters here is getting the handle flex. To open close handle is now only a matter of adjusting flex shape value. ...


7

Original Article: Overview of Inverse Kinematics You’ve probably heard of Inverse Kinematics. IK is a popular tool in Blender and computer graphics, but if this is the first time you’ve tried to create or use an Inverse Kinematics system then you might want more details. I’m going to explain what IK is, define the vocabulary, and review the uses. What is ...


7

It should work this way: Create 2 armatures, A and B, and create a bezier curve with 3 vertices that follows the armature B’s arc. Parent both bones a2 and a3 to bone a1 in Keep Offset mode. In Pose mode, give a2 a Limit Location constraint / Local Space mode, with only the Y axis unchecked, so that this bone can only move on its Y axis. Hook each vertex of ...


6

Under the Rig Main Properties you have the IK/FK slider. Below that you have two options to snap the pose to either the IK or FK position. p.s. I notice you are using the MetaRig to animate. Generally the MetaRig is used to generate a new rig with all the bells and whistles like IK/FK organised for you. The 'generation' also creates the Rig Layers which ...


6

You need to use the IK Limit rotation found as shown below:


5

Like this? Yeah, that's a tricky one and it needs either a cheat or the not so new but usually overlooked iTaSC solver. So, in the settings of your armature, enable iTaSC: I made the blue part the boss and the green will follow. If I'm not mistaken, this special solver doesn't like unparented targets, so I made a main bone. The hierarchy is as follows (u =...


4

That method works extremely well for all sorts of short bendy things, tails, tentacles, tongues, you name it. Only having 3 controllers for all of it makes animating a snap, too. I just want to add, that a couple of modifiers in combination with the mesh are useful: First, a Subdivision Surface Modifier, to make sure there is enough geometry there to be ...


4

To make sure that the slot is sharp and to avoid unpleasant mesh folding, you need to rework the topology and bring a new bone that overlap the slot. Now parent With Automatic Weight again, give your object a Subdivision Surface modifier (with a Subdivision of 2), and right click and Shade Smooth: The way you wanted to mirror your animation is not the right ...


4

Well, the basic structure that you're trying to do here-- copying location, world->local-- is just not the right one for the problem you're trying to solve. Let me start by being explicit about what your current constraint is doing: it is finding the world Y location of the head of foot_bone_low. This is a number. It is then applying that as local space ...


3

I ended up using bendy bones – which are essentially a number of bones aligned to a spline, whose control points can be animated. I found this youtube tutorial very helpful. using drivers to map the position of an object to a parameter of the spline is a neat trick.


3

After take a look into your Blender's file. I think that your problem is about your Leg Control bones aren't have the same local rotation in edit mode. So whenever you do mirror paste, your bone will move at wrong direction. How to fix it: Select your armature then press TAB to enter Edit Mode Select both of your Leg Control bones then press CTRL + N ...


3

Solution: The gun and body armatures were separate, so I deleted the original gun armature and created one inside the body armature. Using IK that targets the last bone of the gun and uses the gun mesh as a pole. I could achieve an almost, if not completely perfect result. Took me way too long to find it myself, so I'll leave it here for others, who suffer ...


3

You can bake your action into a new action clearing all constarints, so the animation will act the same movements without the need of IK. To do so, select in pose mode all deforming bones, and go to the menu:"Pose - Animation - Bake Action".


3

In order for the IK constraint to know that the knee is supposed to bend (even with a pole target), it needs to start slightly bent. In edit mode, move the kneecap slightly forward. Once you've done this, the knee should bend correctly. Note that if the IK target FootIK is further away from the hip than the ankle is, the leg will be fully extended and the ...


2

Consider using a Spline IK on the armature. In the animation above the influence of the constraint is keyframed. Animate the curve as part of your animation. Animate influence of Spline IK constraint as part of your animation. Your bones will flow fluidly under the control of the curve. Save poses. Many options. Attach this in pose mode. Bones in yellow ...


2

In the bone IK constraint, try to disable weight influence for position, leave it only for rotation. You can restore influence to 1.0 as is probably needed for rotation.


2

There are two ways that you can do this. You can either select the bone and add in rotation constraints or you can do it a really easy way. Simply select the bone you want not to rotate while in pose mode. Then press N to bring up the additional menu on the right side of the view port. The top tab that says transform is what you want to look at. Where ...


2

The legs need a bend in their default position. Select the armature, go into Edit Mode, and push the knees forward a tad. Here's what it should look like after that. Also, consider reducing the leg IK chain length to 2. This will make the bending more predictable.


2

The issue you have is parenting. You would have the hand bone as a child of the lower arm bone, this parenting defines the position of the hand, preventing the location constraint from moving it. As the bone parenting doesn't effect the rotation, your rotation constraint can do it's thing. You have the right idea with using IK, the IK constraint will set ...


2

You've got many dependency cycle into your Rig, as you can see on console : This is because you add a limit distance between your IK target and bone that have the IK constraint. Delete your limit distance constraint, and everything will be find. (Why exactly you added this constraint ?)


2

You'll need to create a symmetrical armature first, rig it properly, and then assign proper weights to the mesh. What you get is partially logical. Think about it: The vertices of the right hand side of your crossbow are parented to the left bone. That bone, when it deforms, rotates counter-clockwise. Since the vertices have no idea yet that they should ...


2

You need to check "Override Exported Data" when importing the mhx2 file, and add a rig: The rig controls are under the "MHX2 Runtime" tab (Layers and "FK/IK Switch") in the tools panel. The MakeWalk addon is not needed for this, only the MakeHuman import-runtime.


2

As it turns out, this is impossible. The issue of ik constraints being ignored because of a pole target is a known problem. Hopefully support for this function will be added in the future. I might have to look into fixing it myself.


2

So by messing around I managed to find my own mistake, and hopefully this answer will help others avoid it. As is the standard with most IK setups, I have 2 bones in the place of the Hand: The actual deforming Hand bone, which is child of the Lower Arm bone A helper "Controller" bone, which occupies the same space as the Hand bone, but is not a child of ...


2

Select only top level bones. Select only bones that have no parent, to be children of the new root bone. As can be seen in the picture fore_arm has been re-parented from presumably upper_arm to the root bone via incorrectly selecting all and parenting to new root. Suggest, after adding new root bone (before any parenting), select all other bones on the ...


2

One simple solution is to select the foot bones and uncheck the "Inherit Rotation" option. Another interesting foot behaviour can be achieved parenting the Foot bone to the LegIK bone instead of Shin (and leaving the "Inherit Rotation" Checked). Anyway the foot rigging is one of the most complex situation in human rigging; so, to improve your leg, you can ...


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