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1

The above answer is absolutely wonderful I did however have to edit the script a bit to prevent errors from making it function as expected. According to the error, objects do not have an unlink function. I substituted the clearscene() function to simply remove the default Cube as the light and camera are of no concern for my particular usage. Working in 2....


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Sometimes when a 3d model is exported then imported, it can be imported really far away and/or really small. Its origin may be displaced. What you can do is select the object and then in the top left go to 3d cursor so you are moving the 3d cursor. Then move the 3d cursor to a place were you can see. Then select the move option at the top left and select the ...


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1000 Stamen is quite a lot, are you sure you need that many in Unity to make it look good? There are some solutions: Ignore the 35MB, let Unity optimize it. That would be np if there are no other objects in the scene make sure the stems have as few vertices as possible and reduce their number. If the stem source object(s) have modifiers on them either ...


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In Blender 2.8 we now have "batch rename". Just go to Edit > Batch Rename


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This is caused by the way Blender imports FBX animations. It's extremely unoptimized which can cause long and complex animations (like motion capture ones) to take hours to import. You should use the BVH format with the HumanIK skeleton in the exporter options of Rokoko Studio to export your animation. This format can be imported into Blender quickly without ...


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The cause of that is return in 2699th line of code in import_x3d.py which returns the method. Moreover, the color vectors need alpha value to be added. Fix: def appearance_CreateMaterial(vrmlname, mat, ancestry, is_vcol): bpymat = bpy.data.materials.new(vrmlname) diff_color = mat.getFieldAsFloatTuple('diffuseColor', [0.5, 0.5, 0.5, 1], ancestry) ...


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The simplest way for this kind of data would be to convert to a .csv (comma-separated-values) file. You can do it easily in Excel with Save As > csv. Then simply access the lines with open(path). This is my input file : import bpy for line_number, line in enumerate(open(r'C:\YourFolder\YourFile.csv')): columns = line.rstrip().split(';') # Replace by ...


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Alternatively, you could use the pandas library. (How to install - see here: Using 3rd party Python modules) With pandas, you can then use the pandas.read_excel() to import your worksheet into a DataFrame, which is basically an array but with named columns to make indexing easier.


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Personally, if it's an option, I would export as a CSV and read it in with something like https://docs.python.org/3/library/csv.html


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