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1

I’m not sure what “thin faces” are, unless you’re using a calculation system that automatically detects parts of the object that are very thin. In this case, yes, you should fatten those areas up, because they might cause trouble with fragility in the 3-D printing system. Some 3-D printing websites will automatically detect such places and fatten up the ...


3

Yes it is possible but I am not entirely sure what exactly are you looking for... you can use a spherical gradient like this and this could be your starting base... use some plane as a reference object while using it on the more complex objects like this cube:


1

Check out the Grading Texture in the shader editor with set to spherical. For an indipendant center set the Texture Coordinate to Object and use another object as reference.


5

You can give the object a Displace modifier. along Normals, and animate the strength: This can be modulated by aiming it at a vertex-group, to vary the inflation along the vessels, or combined with a Solidify.. there are various possible elaborations. Here, a Corrective Smooth has been added at the bottom of the stack, to iron out intersections. You may ...


2

There are Face Normals, Split Normals, and Vertex Normals. Like the Face Normals, the Split Normals affect the shading of an object. They are important for hard-surface modeling, and can solve but also introduce problems. Split Normals Data can exist on imported objects or can be created by the two modifiers: Normal Edit and Weighted Normal when the ...


0

Usually normals simply point to the direction perpendicular to the face. It tells how light should behave when hitting that surface. Smooth shading works by creating a smooth gradient between the normals. More info here. Custom normals allow you to bend the rules, e.g. stylized look like shown here. It is unclear to me how you got custom normals on your ...


5

Select the whole inner loop of edges using alt+left click, then select Face > Grid Fill from the menu at the top of the Viewport


1

The geometry is still there, but Blender only shows the detailed mesh for the one object that you are editing. By separating the meshes, you've made the cartridge into a second mesh as you can see in the outliner. Exit edit mode, select the cartridge and enter edit mode and you will see its geometry but not the geometry of the bullet.


0

I had the same problem just recently and the culprit seems to be "Rigid Body World" as mentioned by Max Appian. If "Rigid Body World" is ON and objects are created using the array modifier, attempting to "Set Origin to Geometry" causes the spawned objects to relocate to the spawner object. The origin is not set. This is after ...


2

The problem is not that your U shaped objects are being offset. Add a circle and set its vertex count to 20 in the Last Operator Adjust panel. Something around 41.4mm radius will have the circle vertices just touch the edges of the U shapes in the array: Your problem is that the flat parts of the cylinder aren't the same distance from the center as the ...


1

You need one UV coordinate for every corner of a polygon. Fill in an array with your UVs with something like: uvs = [] # Face 0 faces.append([0,1,2]) uvs += [ 0.0, 0.0, # UV for first corner (vertex 0) 1.0, 0.0, # UV for second corner (vertex 1) 1.0, 1.0, # UV for third corner (vertex 2) ] # Face 1 faces.append([2, 0, 3]) uvs += [ 0.0,...


2

You need to use all the modelling functions to create the geometry. In order to use them, you first need to learn them. This might take more effort and dedication than you expect, so being prepared for dedicating some time to it might be a good idea. Going through these menus(in edit mode) and learning what each function does would help a lot with this kind ...


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