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7

This is rather easy to do. Just add a Simple Deform Modifier. Set it to Bend and select the right axis. Enter the desired angle (it's 45° by default) Note: In this case bending along the Z axis doesn't work as expected. To make it work, rotate the object's origin by -90°, or use an empty rotated by -90°. Thanks to @lemon, @plem and @robin-betts for ...


6

I think the answer is: yes you can. Select the connecting edge and snap the 3D cursor to it Set the pivot point to 3D Cursor The connecting edge still selected, add a custom transformation orientation and keep it as orientation Now Select the first triangle (the target) Use ShiftNumpad 1 or ShiftNumpad 3 to be in orthographic view aligned with this ...


5

Script Version For two triangles can use the rotation difference of the hinge edges adjoining face normals. In angle axis format this will be the angle required to rotate, and axis should be parallel to the hinge edge. To use, edit mode, edge selection. Select hinge edge. Shift select edge on tri face you wish to rotate to coplanar. Hit run script. Test ...


4

I would just edit the crease angle property so it detects the higher angles.


4

To Rotate the vertex into the plane, follow @Lemon's answer, or a variant. To Project the vertex onto the plane: With pivot set to 'Active Element' Create a Custom Orientation from the face/ 3 vertices which will remain stationary. This is the '+' in the Orientation dropdown. You may want to add this to your Quick Menu, or create a shortcut for it. You ...


3

It was caused by one flipped face. The Bevel tool was confused, not knowing which way to go. Recalculate Normals, so they're all pointing outwards. Then the Bevel tool will work correctly. Mesh > Normals > Recalculate Outside


2

Select the vertices/edges/faces you don't want to be affected by proportional editing and hit H to hide them, when you're done with the proportional edit, unhide with Alt + H . You have now done a proportional editing that did not affect the hidden vertices/edges/faces.


2

If I'm understanding your question correctly, the issue is that you are in Solid view and want to see the Material Preview. Click this button at the top right of the 3D viewport and you will see the material attached to the object. As an aside, you can change the color of objects in Solid shading mode by scrolling down towards the bottom of the Material ...


2

So, First, you have overlapping vertices. Select all your vertices with A in edit mode and vertex select mode, and Press ALT + M > by distance in order to eliminate double-vertices. The real problem is you have 3 inside faces which mess up your boolean operation. Notice how in wireframe view, some faces have a clearer shade of grey. That means there ...


1

It is impossible to exactly reduce the amount of faces of an object, but there are tricks to doing so: 1) Use the decimate modifier, and adjust the settings while watching the faces-count and the quality of the object. Here's how this works: Go to the modifiers tab, and select decimate. Then set this modifier to un-subdivide. The modifier will show the ...


1

A few things wrong with this: 1) you are selecting vertices, not faces. This would be so much easier to do by selecting faces. 2) You are trying to scale the face along the X axis. Since it can not get thicker along that axis, to move it, transform it on the X axis, don't scale it.


1

Recorded a quick video showing how to easily do it. The steps are: Create two loop-cuts on the smallest/thinnest part. Snap the new loops along the X axis(or whatever axis are appropriate for your mesh) to the mesh you want to merge it with. Select the faces your mesh is going through and create an inset face. Scale down the new faces and snap the edges ...


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