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17

You can use Proportional Editing. Start with a default UV sphere Move the top vertex upwards Check ✓ Proportional editing, Falloff > Sharp and adjust to your liking


11

The Screw modifier is still a great choice for this style of object. Make sure Merge is turned on to fix the shading at the wide end. It lets you control the profile with a single curve of vertices, adjust the resolution dynamically, and generally gives you a lot of control with very few drawbacks. You can apply it later if you need to make rotationally ...


6

With the Default Cube. Just as a cube turns into a sphere with enough levels of Catmul Clarke Subdivision surface, can make it a tear drop. Add the cube, in edit mode select top face and scale to 0. S0. making the top face a zero area, (edge length 0) ... all 4 verts in same location quad face. Without quad faces, sub'd modifier results look like rubbish. ...


4

You can use the operator panel to do that: Once you have validated the scale, you can set the values manually.


3

In this case, you can: Select the cylinder, shift select the grid then enter edit mode. Go to wireframe view and uncheck X Ray. Then from the top view, box select.


2

Change the Pivot Point to 3D Cursor (shortcut .):


2

The solution was to upgrade Blender from 2.82. 2.83 had big improvements in skinning for the glTF importer. By the way, if you ever have issues with how a skinned mesh looks in edit mode, you can also try toggling the "Guess Original Bind Pose" option on the glTF import screen.


2

Weight paint only allows you to select bones on an armature that is linked to the mesh with an armature modifier, so you need to make sure that that is set up properly before weight painting.


1

It depends on your mesh. If the eyesockets are UV spheres with the poles left and right then it's fairly easy. You might need one or two more edge loops that work as the compressed lids. To close the lids you rotate the edge loops over the eyeball, the upper lid down and the bottom lid up. You can do this in the following way: Select the vertices of the ...


1

I struggled to understand what you're trying to make based on your top/bottom/side views, is this what you're going for? I made the object a couple of times, and this was the best workflow I could figure out: Create a circle object Use proportional editing to make the circle into a teardrop shape. Bridge edge loops to fill in the circle Make two copies of ...


1

If the pixels only occur after you import your video into iMovie and not in the rendered file on your computer, then it is probably an issue within iMovie rather than with Blender. You can try exporting the scene as PNGs which you can then string together at 24 per second if you are looking for a different format to use. If the rendered scene looks okay when ...


1

As John Eason and Nathan said in the comments: unhiding in selection mode solves the problem. In case others have the same problem here is how to solve it: first select your bezier curve, then go to edit mode and press A to select everything. To unhide press Alt + H


1

Just move the vertices back where you want them in Edit mode. Looks like they’ve been moved only in the X direction so should be simple enough to G (grab), X (in X axis only), drag them back. There aren’t many so shouldn’t take long to put them back. It’s difficult to give more precise instructions without knowing about what it is you did to mess them up.


1

I've made the donut before! This problem was mentioned in the videos somewhere, either in the same episode or the follow up episode. It is caused by an extra accidental layer of icing when extruding the region by extruding twice, the layer is probably meshed with your icing, so at this point the only thing you can do is delete the icing, and make a new one :...


1

http://nikitron.cc.ua/sverch/html/nodes/analyzer/points_inside_mesh.html here you can make so http://nikitron.cc.ua/sverch/html/nodes/solid/points_inside_solid.html or here


1

Import your models (or design from scratch) your bracket objects into a .blend file. Each bracket should be a separate Blender object. You can name the brackets whatever you like. I recommend some syntax which let's you know the intended tooth, and some of the clinical parameters of the bracket's prescription. Eg, "UR3_tip11_tq0" for an Upper Right ...


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