33

You could use the Vertex Weigh Proximity modifier to control displacement. It will use the actual shape of the mesh to correctly displace the surface. Create a new vertex group in your "skin" mesh and add all vertex to it with a strength of $1$. Now add a new Vertex Weigh Proximity modifier, pick that vertex group, set the "Worm" mesh as Target Object and ...


26

The cast modifier should let you do exactly what is in the video, with only a couple of steps. To set it up, you will need a hose object with fairly dense geometry, and an object to pass through the hose. To set up the system, you will need to have the object (I'm going to use a sphere as an example since that was the object in the video) positioned at one ...


12

Here are the steps: Select Cycles for Render Engine Select Experimental for Feature Set Select Dicing Rate and Preview count in Subdivision drop down Select Subdivision Modifier from Modifiers tab but do not apply it Check Adaptive check box and choose dicing scale Done! I hope that helps


12

The strategy in this example is to generate the displaced position Q of the shading point P (in an originally planar Object space), and subtract P from Q to give the displacement vector. The displacement is masked. If P is outside the input Radius (r2 in the tree) from object 0 , it is not displaced. A soft border has been put on the mask to prevent ...


11

It calculates the distance between the element you are changing. If it is within the radius the user selects it will use a falloff that the user has selected. Basically the values of the matrix of the transformation that the user is done is influences by the distance of the other elements. As you can see here. Possible falloffs Note: distance = 1 - (the ...


11

In Blender 2.80 the Material's Displacement input socket accepts vectors (blue socket) instead of scalars (grey socket), which gives it more possibilities (look up "vector displacement"). To properly convert a scalar Displacement map, usually a greyscale image, and make it pluggable into the material's Displacement, you need to use a Displacement node: ...


10

I got a pretty decent result by using an ocean modifier and a displace modifier. I find that icospheres lend themselves to displacement better than UV spheres due to the more even geometry. So for the above example I used an icosphere with a subsurf modifier to give it some more geometry. The basic wavy fluid look is produced with an ocean modifier. The ...


10

Just scale all of the individual parts down to a size of 0 in the UVmap (using individual origins as scaling center). That way, each part will stay intact, but will be displaced as a whole according to the value of your noise where that UV island resides. UV Map: Result: Edit: if you use a displacement modifier instead of shader displacement, it's easier ...


9

The easiest way to do this is with an empty (empties can be thought of as an object that only stores loc, rot, and scale). In the modifier, just switch the type to object, and then specify an empty in the drop-down box. Here is an example blend:


9

Vector displacement maps can contain negative values (and this one does), so you also need to disable "clamp" under the texture's "colors" rollout. Also, you need to apply rotation since the by default Blender will import Zbrush obj's with a 90 degree object rotation to handle the Y-up/Z-up conversion, you want that applied to the base mesh, not the post-...


9

Only DirectX applications use DX normal maps. And DirectX run only under Windows mainly due to license. For everything else you need to use OpenGL. For sure is good always check documentation. On image below you can find simple way how to convert DX to OpenGL (or OpenGL to DX)


9

You generate the displacement mathematically by combining multiple Sine waves at different amplitudes, frequencies and orientations. By carefully selecting the frequencies of the waves you can ensure that they all coincide at the start/end so that the animation can be looped. Here's the result : This is produced by the following material : This looks ...


9

You can use displacement. Open a movie or image file. Create a cuboid, stretched along its X-Axis and add an array modifier, duplicating it along the Y-Axis. I choose a relative offset off 2 in the array modifier, this creates gaps between the stripes. In edit mode add a lot of loopcuts along the longest axis, in my case X. Apply the modifier. Unwrap it ...


9

The property you need to change is rather hidden in the UI unfortunately. Blender allows you to change the behavior of Displacement vector inputs per material. So as a result, there is a dropdown box in the Materials tab in the Properties Editor, under Settings -> Surface -> Displacement: By default that will be set to Bump Only. Change it either to ...


8

The simplest method of creating mist is to simply use the Compositor to use the Z pass to control a Mix Color node. The Divide node should be set to the range of the required mist in Blender Units - ie, the distance between the point where there is no mist to where the mist is fully obscuring the scene. The Subtract node can be set to indicate where the ...


8

Yes, you can. But you need to use different modifiers for this. First, remove subsurf and use multires+displacement: You need to use multires for simplicity in creating normal map for game engine. With normal map you can create a detailed object without complex geometry, that important for game engines. For creating normal map, unwrap your object (U), ...


8

To have consistent scale, create an Empty in your scene and make it control the texture scale. Create an Empty Edit your material by adding an Input>Texture Coordinate, using the Object socket and linking it to the Empty in the "Object" dropdown Scale (, Rotate, Move) the Empty to make the feature the size you want. This will apply in a coherent way to ...


7

Blender uses the OpenGL format. This image shows an optimized version of normal map conversion, because it doesn't convert between number and color, so it is faster with Cycles and EEVEE: This second picture shows how you can recognize OpenGL normal maps just by looking at them. Notice, that on OpenGL normal map it looks as if there is light shining from ...


7

The confusion is probably stemming from the fact that this output was changed post-2.79. More confusingly, the later builds are still officially labeled as a form of 2.79 due to how Blender versioning works. For clarity, the rest of this answer will use "2.79" to refer to the stable release and previous versions, and the term "nightlies" to refer to the post-...


7

The Displacement node is an upcoming feature - this is an example of the documentation being ahead of the official Blender release. You’ll note that in the example image from the documentation the Material Output Displacement socket is a Vector type (it’s blue). At all ‘current’ releases of Blender the Displacement socket is a Scalar value (grey) and would ...


7

The Settings panel from your first screenshot is from the Cycles render engine. The second screenshot shows a project where Eevee is the current render engine. The render engine can be changed in the Render Properties tab.


6

What you are looking for is probably a regular displacement modifier. Most options you tried are "generative" and create geometry or alter it profoundly, making them unsuitable for applying on more complex geometry like a character. Just use your regular mesh character, a sphere or any other more complex shape, add some subdivisions to it with a Subsurf ...


6

I think you'll need to use a UV map here as using a vertex group does not seem to give a good result. As you want to use a displace modifier you'll need to subdivide your shape a lot. But, whatever the subdivision level is, the precision of the displacement will be limited by the texture resolution itself. So, if the model is to be 3D printed, both ...


6

Have you tried with Lattice? Not easy to manipulate though... Create a plane, subdivide it. Create a lattice above your plane. Give your plane a Lattice modifier with the lattice as Object. Move the lattice vertices so that it deforms the plane the way you want. Create some shapekeys if you want this shape to change over time. Move it over the plane. You'...


6

Change slightly Strenght value of first Displace modifier. Or move vertices a bit on Y axis. In this case t is caused by first Displace modifier that brings vertices in conflict position for boolean operation. Usually it is some overlapping geometry that creates weird cut that collaps all system :) Sometimes helps to change Overlap Threshold value, but not ...


6

Can use a "schrinkwrap modifier". Using the following settings: Projection, on the plane surface, along Z axis, for the Suzanne parts that become negative relative to it.


5

Baking Displacement maps is very easy in Blender Internal. Switch to it.Then unwrap low poly object. Switch baking pass to Displacement, set appropriate distance.Enable Selected to Active. Select low poly object, switch to Edit mode.In UV/Image editor create new image (switch 32bit float on when generating), make sure, that UV map of the object is displayed ...


5

Knife project could help you: subdivide a plane that will become your "shape cut" grid. then over it (higer in Z) put you shape (just the outer edges, delete everything else) then select - first the cutting shape - then (shift-select) also the background subdivided plane, then search and use "knife project" then, your plane now has a cut shaped exactly ...


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