2

When Blender creates a new object, if one of that name already exists then it adds the suffix to make it unique. You can pickup that name immediately after creation via the 'name' property. In your case you simply need to use o.name in place of empty_name : import bpy empty_name = 'MyOwnEmpty' o = bpy.data.objects.new( empty_name, None ) bpy.context.scene....


2

Change your follow path constraint like this: Then keyframe offset from 0 to 0.8 Result: https://youtu.be/6IdUgpwBVgw


2

close observation shows that your flaps control surface all are rigged and are parented to the box empty and it moves along with the rig and what you want is that the engine parts that you have made in another blend file that was imported to the current blend file needs to also follow along with the body . well parenting dosent hold good for these things ...


1

Instead of using a follow path constraint you can do this: Add an empty in the world origin. Parent your sphere to it (Keep offset). Then animate the z-Rotation of the empty/sphere, which is much easier to use. I've taken your blend file and parented the sphere to a rotating empty which is parented to an empty that's moving back and forth on the Y axis. The ...


1

Add a new bone, set it to copy loc and rot of the stretching bone (in world space), and use 3 copies of the same driver to drive its 3 scale values with the Y scale value of the stretching bone (local space).


1

This was done without bones and only 1 (track-to) constraint for each rocker-arm push-rod. (Blend file below) It's only necessary to build and animate one rocker assembly to begin with and that's described below... The method used to move the valve and only on contact with the rocker-arm is firstly to set the valve's origin point to it's very top center ...


1

It's natural to think that when you're using 3 vertices as the target of a constraint, that you're using a face. But you're not, not quite. You're still just using 3 vertices, and vertices don't have full transforms. As zero-dimensional thingies, they don't have rotation or scale. When you use a constraint that tracks a vertex group, you can reliably ...


1

With less Python than the other answer: From the Armature's Edit Mode, select the bones you'd like to copy to the other side. Run "Armature" > "Symmetrize". This will copy all the bone settings, including constraints— But it will not always replace the constraints' targets with the mirrored equivalents. Open a Python Console UI area....


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