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If you read the python console start message you will notice that some modules and some variables are builtin or have been imported for our convenience. eg bpy and C = bpy.context. PYTHON INTERACTIVE CONSOLE 3.7.3 (default, Apr 3 2019, 19:16:38) [GCC 8.0.1 20180414 (experimental) [trunk revision 259383]] Command History: Up/Down Arrow Cursor: ...


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Well, I still can't find a way to change an object, but I did find out how to delete the current object and create a slightly altered object for every frame. The key is to use bpy.app.handlers: import bpy, math #remove all default objects bpy.data.objects['Cube'].select = True bpy.data.objects['Camera'].select = True bpy.data.objects['Lamp'].select = ...


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Thankyou @RobertGützkow for your help! The solution was true that I needed to have a python-specific file (outside of blender) that I could run. To do this I 1) created a new Text.txt file 2) named it the same name as my script (optional) 3) copied and pasted the code into the text.txt file 4) rename the text.txt --> text.py 5) add the text.py file path ...


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You need to run the Blender executable from the command line. In Windows this requires you to run a new Command Prompt and the execute blender.exe from the correct location. In Linux/MAC the process is similar. On my Windows machine, I go to the Start Bar and type in Command in the new window I type the directory to where Blender was installed followed ...


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