Hot answers tagged

9

That's absolutely possible. Keep all the cameras in one place and only change the X Shift.


7

You have an object just named “Cube” that is hidden in viewports, but not in renders: This object obscures the camera: Either delete the object or disable it for renders as well, and your problem will be resolved.


7

In short If you set Focal Length and Sensor Size values matching your real-cam ... it should work. Those two values represent perspective (optics) behaviour, including FOV (sure without lens distortions and other optics defects). Dimension values (Resolution X/Y in px) are as naming states - about rendered dimension, that can be set as cropped or extended ...


7

To sync values from one place to another you can use copy&paste driver. For example go to Output Properties > Dimension > Resolution X and right-click parametr, from dropdown menu select Copy as New Driver. Go to Shader Editor and right-click above Width parametr and choose Paste Driver. Field became violet which means driver is set. Now by ...


6

Shift the camera. Adjusting the shift setting of the camera, such that the camera aligned 2d bounding box of object is centered. Result of running on default scene, then transforming and re running, there is no constraint pointing camera to origin of object, if so there would be less shift depending on origin point Firstly as mentioned in question am ...


6

Top view for camera has no translation or rotation. See. Align camera to view precisely and automatically, without manual fiddling How to convert current view as camera? Oops, realized after making gif q asked for perspective rather than ortho. ie don't change to ortho, however ortho is IMO may be a better way to make text look 2D. In the cameras property ...


6

you can check "lock to object" and choose your camera. Then press "toggle to camera view" so that you are looking through your camera. Then parent your reference image to the camera and by this you will always the your referenced image as you want. Result:


6

The point (0,0,0), converted from Camera Space to World Space using a Vector Transform node, is the location of the camera in World Space. If you subtract the object's World Space location from that, you get the WS vector from the object to the camera. We're only interested in the direction of that vector, not its length, so we can Normalize that, and use ...


5

From the camera view frame. bpy: How do you find the corners of a camera frustum? A camera points in the -Z direction. For a perspective camera can find the vectors of the origin to the frustum and if and where they intersect with the XY plane. Test script. Have kept it simple. Uses the scene camera, finds the frustum, adds a cube on XY plane given image (0,...


5

Go to Preferences -> Themes -> 3D Viewport -> Camera


5

You can try one of those ... go to menu View > Align View > Align Active Camera to View or earch for operator Align Active Camera to View or add to Favourites by right click on operator > Add to Quick Favourites ... and in viewport call by Q or go to User Preferences > Keymap and assign new shortcut


5

Add a Copy Location Constraint on the Camera and set the object to follow as the Target. Check Offset to keep current offset and prevent camera snapping to the object tracked.


4

Script version. import bpy from bpy import context scene = context.scene cam = scene.camera mw = cam.matrix_world f = 1 if cam.type == 'ORTHO' else cam.data.display_size corners = [mw @ (f * p) for p in cam.data.view_frame(scene=scene)] ''' # add empties at corners for i, p in enumerate(corners): bpy.ops.object.empty_add(location=p) context....


4

You can also go to the camera setting, and click Viewport Display, and set the Passepartout to 1.


4

I guess @vklidu has already explained everything, but since my linked answer to a different question was maybe misunderstable I tried a visualization of the relations between image size, focal length, sensor size and the FOV to answer one part of your question: Why does reducing Resolution X increase my camera's FOV and increasing it reduce FOV? (The ...


4

In the dopesheet and graph editor, you can select some or all channels and use the menu Channel with the "group channels" (Ctrl G) and "Ungroup channels" (Ctrl Alt G) functions. This grouping/ungrouping is useful only for organization purposes, when you have lots of curves and you want to organize them, it has no impact on their behaviour....


4

No, there is no "magical focal length". And although it might look strange that's how perspective works... it distorts objects in 3d space perspectively. However - and that's how you can do it with a real life camera for example - to minimize the perspective distortion you just have to go further away from the object and use a higher focal length. ...


4

a vertex has single camera position if viewed directly, but can indirectly contribute to zero, all, or any pixels, so no, can't be done in general case. example: there are only two spheres in this scene


4

Default sensor fit is "Auto" - modifying output resolution only affects the smaller sides: You can go to your camera settings to change the sensor fit to "Vertical": Related: How to set specific sample spacing (meters in between each pixel) for a Blender Cycles Render And a great thorough explanation by Gordon Brinkmann here: Why does ...


4

Here's one way to do what you want in 2.79. As you've already done: Create your camera and leave it at the origin Create your path, in your case, a Bezier Circle, centered on the tracked object Create your tracked object, in your case an empty at the origin. Set a constraint on your camera to track to the tracked object. Finally, add a Follow Path ...


4

Nothing is broken, here, this is an intended design. Camera view allows you to zoom in or out without permanently moving the camera object so you can close in on details or inspect the scene without exiting camera view. This allows you to keep your carefully crafted camera position, possibly even animated, while zooming in on a specific detail of your shot ...


4

AFAIK this cannot be done with parenting. But... you could simply use the copy location constraint instead. It just copies the location of another object. result:


4

There's a built-in add-on for importing Nuke .chan files: Nuke. Be sure to read the tips and limitations in the manual. To enable it Edit -> Preferences Select the Add-ons tab type nuke click the checkbox to enable: To import a .chan file File->Import Select Nuke (.chan) use the file browser to navigate to and select the .chan file you want to ...


4

You can create a Custom Orientation from your Camera. With that orientation in use, if you ShiftS snap the 3D Cursor to the camera, amd use it as your Transform Pivot Point, you can, for example, SZ scale an object up and down the camera's axis, and its appearance through the camera won't change. If you want to create objects aligned to the camera, then on ...


3

Drivers, Fixed Postion and Offset Factor. 99% of the time when using follow path, I don't bother with the parenting option, I rather just add the constraint and use fixed offset. Doing such allows me to animate the offset factor. 0 being the start of the curve, 1 the end. Trig. This one I've used some trig to drive the local Y rotation of the camera. The ...


3

Create the curve. Add the cube, create a constraint for it: Follow Path, enable "Follow Curve" and click the "Animate Path" button. Add the camera, parent it to the cube. At the beginning of the scene, set it to point along the path. Set a Rotation keyframe for the position before the camera should 'reverse'. Go to the frame / time when ...


3

I have been searching for help about this for a long time. The answer would be "not using follow path", use "keyframe on camera transform" instead. Path is a set of points with no direction, while you need a 6 DOF description of camera motion. Here's some Python scripts. Assuming you have camera pose in translation + quaternion format. ...


3

In some way, you can do this with: 3D Viewport ‣ View ‣ Viewport Render but you have to keep in mind it won't be standard render. You will have to disable from rendering viewport overlays, like: floor, axis etc. Examples: Standard render: Standard viewport render: Viewport render without viewport overlays: More info: https://docs.blender.org/manual/en/...


3

You can use a preset viewpoint.Click on any preset viewpoint: Click on any axis and your camera will snap to that location and then when you move around, the camera should be in the correct angle. This is the same thing as using the number pad. the number pad is only the Keyboard shortcut for this. Hope it helps!


3

Create an empty, set it child of the moving object, set the camera track to constraint to the empty, then add some noise to the Z loc of the empty. To do this set a starting loc keyframe, then in the graph editor select the Z loc channel of the empty and add a graph noise modifier.


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