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11

From the 2.62 release notes - For renders where only the camera or materials are changing, while meshes stay fixed, it is now possible to skip the sometimes slow BVH step, by enabling BVH Cache in the Performance panel. This will store the BVH on disk for subsequent (animation) renders of the same scene. Note that if the scene does change in the animation,...


9

Blender 2.81 (not mantaflow) This solution works but was probably never designed to work like this, therefore I can't guarantee that it's a stable workflow. It was stable enough when I tested it anyway. Unfortunately, you should have already baked your smoke simulation using "External", otherwise you'll need to bake it again. Choose a directory for your ...


7

Yes, cycles caches BVH (Bounding Volume Hierarchy) files in there when Cache BVH is enabled in Render settings > Performance: Deleting them shouldn't do anything bad. Cycles will just regenerate these files (though it won't cache them if you disable Cache BVH), which might cause an increase in render times, depending on the complexity of your scene.


7

When doing simulations in blender the results will be cached as you play through the animation. Most simulations will only keep the cache data in RAM until the blend file is saved, when you will get an option of saving the cache to a folder located next to the blend file. While each simulation has it's own variations, the most common simulation cache ...


6

Short answer: There is no “rendered” cache. Not all codecs are equal. As to the first point, every single operation, including shifting resolutions from your source file to destination, alpha overs, etc. are all done in real-time. This means that if you stack twenty strips with Alpha Over, every one is calculated on the fly. As to the second point, codecs ...


4

I pressume you are using cloth simulation for the flag. Go to the Cloth cache and modify the end to the number of frames you need.


4

Under the menu: Scene selection > Rigid Body World > Rigid Body Cache > Free All Bakes > Reset Start and End > Bake This worked for me in 2.74. It took less than a minute to bake 325 frames.


4

It's possible (although likely not advisable - but I found quite interesting) to manipulate the actual blendcache files to change the order - although you should avoid points where particles are created or destroyed (ie, stick to sections where particles are only moving) or you can get strange results (eg, particles staying in place when they should have ...


3

If you reload the clip on the Movie Clip Editor, the cache will be cleared. Also keep in mind that the amount of memory used for the cache can be managed on the System Preferences (CtrlAltU) ->System ->Sequencer/Clip Editor ->Memory Cache Limit


3

After quite some digging around and wading through the source code, I found that upon initialising the ptcache for the smoke simulation, blender checks a flag PTCACHE_BAKED. This flag appears to be saved with the blend file. If the flag is not set, the cache directory is flushed. To prevent this from happening, the file must be saved after baking. For this, ...


2

Before you can render a smoke simulation you need to run the simulation once. To do that go to the first frame and press AltA (or the play animation button on the timeline) Pay attention to the gray bar being created at the bottom of the time line, it will show you the frames that have been cached. So the key thing to learn is that the information for ...


2

If all the properties of a physics item are the same, then yes. Physics will work the same way everytime, if there is no dynamic wind simulation in your scene or something. Its blender, not real life.


2

I was investigating this recently and had to resort to reading the source code to figure this out (blender/source/blender/blenkernel/intern/pointcache.c and ptcache_filename()). I was never able to find any documentation for the various idiosyncrasies. When you create a Disk cache the files end up being named in the pattern %s_%06d_%02d.bphys. The %s is a ...


2

I had the same problem. I had a special character (german ü) in the path of the blend-file, after removing that, everything worked fine.


2

To add to the answer above... The Sequencer only uses 1 CPU core Blender's Sequencer doesn't use all the available power on your computer. The video engine roughly uses one CPU core, and that's it. Note: I'm talking about video, image strips... scene strips are different as you directly render a 3d scene using the engine of your choice. Blender's ...


2

After quite a bit of research I found out that: The physics engine creates the springs (representing edges and if 'Stiff Quads' is set the diagonals of each quad) only once on starting a render animation. The springs are stored in memory somewhere but there doesn't seem to be any way to modify them or reload them during a render animation. So they can't be ...


2

If you didn't specify a place for it to be saved blender automatically places it in a folder on your C drive called tmp. C:\tmp\ you might find it there.


2

Blender's FBX toolset doesn't support point cache data. So you'll have to separate out the mesh from the point cache. Just export the object as an FBX, then save out your point cache in either the LightWave .mdd or the 3DS Max .pc2 format. You can then apply the point cache back to the object in Blender by using the Mesh Cache modifier. However, if you ...


2

There is currently no built-in way to save cache persistently. However, for simple data types, you can store your cache in ID properties in objects. For instance, if you have a vector list vecs that you wish to save, you can save it in an object obj using the expression: obj["frame_1"] = vecs And retrieve the data using the expression obj["frame_1"]. You ...


2

In the Dynamic paint controls you have Frame Start and End.


2

Blender 2.82 (Mantaflow) For Blender 2.82 and Mantaflow this is fairly straight forward. Simply delete the files from the simulation cache which have the frame number in their name that you would like to remove. The cache directory will contain two subdirectories config and data which contain the per frame simulation files. The config directory will ...


1

You can insert keyframes for simulation visibility. Toggle the visibility button for the smoke sim to be off at frame 14 then insert keyframe. Then at frame 15 toggle visibility on then insert keyframe. Finally at frame 16, turn it off again and insert keyframe. It should not keep any of the cached data except for that single frame. FYI it will not show up ...


1

Blender has different simulation engines, and they have different cache length settings¹ (it's honestly true that these settings could be made more consistent...). It appears that you have extended the cache length for the Rigid Body physics inside the Scene tab, but you actually wanted to extend the Cloth cache. You find it here: under Physics > Cloth > ...


1

You need to Bake the smoke domain cache first. This tells Blender to calculate the smoke and store it in the cache and to effectively mark that cache as 'read only' until yo tell it to 'free' it. This will mean that Blender will not attempt re-run the smoke simulation, leaving your manipulated (reversed) cache as it is.


1

As mentioned by cegaton, it's probably better to have a render with time going forward from both point of views. Camera movement is probably keyframed or following a path so you may have to modify the dope sheet to have a stationary camera when re-rendering at destination. Then add the forward animation into the video editor, then the meant-to-be backward ...


1

Turn it on when you want faster test renders. Especially if you are making mostly lighting or material changes. The problem arises when you are rendering a large animation. I always think of cache (in a general sense) as more of a memory thing, and less of a disk space thing. Well, blender is caching it to disk. And it's huge, and if you leave it on ...


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