9

Blender has the same tools as Illustrator, if you enable two addons: Add Curve: Extra Objects (to add a rectangle) Add Curve: Curve Tools (to round corners)


8

Change handle type to free, then you can move just one handle.


7

Sometimes it helps to do some research. Spiral showers aren't really based on a spiral, usually. Here's a typical plan for one: As you can see, the "spiral" is really composed of two half circles; with a 3rd half circle thrown in for good measure. So, you could enable the add-on to draw spirals and fiddle with the settings until you got one ...


7

You need to set the shrinkwrap modifier to act on the spline rather than the geometry: Notice the tooltip. Edit: I expected my mouse cursor to show up, but it didn't. The "affect splines" button is the first button to the right of the Shrinkwrap modifier's name.


7

Geometry Nodes lets you construct this curve as a modifier on a dummy object: which means it can be adjusted after creation: However the disadvantage is that constructive modifiers can't be applied on curves without first converting them to a mesh. If you need to manipulate the curve as a Bezier in Edit Mode , something like @Jachym's answer is better.


6

You can go over to the curve icon or Object Data Properties- Geometry- and increase the offset, depth and extrude values. Then you can go to profile, and begin to tweak the bevel profile. By changing the handle type to vector, and dragging the points upward, you can get a more square profile. You can edit the curve, add points, change the settings, even ...


6

When you scale a curve, it also scales it's vertex radius. And vertex radius affects bevel size. Simply tab to edit mode and set Mean Radius back to 1.


6

You don't need to convert it to grease pencil, you can convert it directly to a mesh : This is the star after I imported it : The origin is at an odd place so, for convenience, I center it in the star with Object > Set Origin > Origin to Center of Mass (I prefer this in this case since Origin to Geometry gives a slightly different result) and then ALT ...


5

That depends on how the handles are set. By default, on a Bézier curve the handle type is set to Aligned, that's why both sides of the curve are affected. If you select a keyframe and press V you get the Set Keyframe Handle Type context menu. There you can choose Free. If you want these Free handles temporarily to affect both sides without changing it back, ...


5

As Moonboots wrote, just use Follow path constraint and don't tap on "animate path". You can define your position by sliding the offset:


4

The resample node has a single count or length parameter for every spline in the curve data. That's just how the node works, it's not a bug. However, with a bit of work, the sample curve node can give you any distribution of points in the curve that you want. Also, It might be better to use a different order when building the tree of instances-- first build ...


4

Quickest hacky way of doing this is to convert the curve into a mesh by selecting curve and go to Object > Convert > Mesh. Then turn on snapping with Snap To edge enabled and Snap With to Center. Make sure Transform Pivot Point is set to Median Point.


4

If you want to cover the jump from V=0 to V=1, you have to map V to some function of V whose value is the same at V=0 and V=1, and (maybe) approaches that value smoothly from both sides. Here are 2 examples.. one using a Color-Ramp, and another, mapping V's (0-1) value to (-pi - pi), and then taking 0.5*cos(the result)+0.5. The second one could be used as a ...


3

Yes, you can do this using geometry nodes. But in this case, you have to remove array modifier, mapping and beveling of the curve and re-build all of that inside GN: Integer value gets frame number by driver. You can get it by typing #frame in field. Or use Blender 3.1 time node. It might be difficult to build a round array, as in your example, use the ...


3

In this video the modeler uses 2 curves to model hair: one bezier circle defines the shape of the hair strand, while the Nurbs path defines its location and path. Once established the rig, the Nurbs path gets edited with simple proportional editing, use the scroll wheel to vary its influence radius as Mqbaka suggested in the comments. Also the radius of ...


3

You can use the float curve and set curve radius nodes to do this. The float curve will shape the curve, if needed you may add a resample curve also to add a bit more geometry. Here is the node tree: and result: Note that in 3.1 curve parameter has been removed, and is now spline parameter.


3

You can do it with a pretty straightfoward Geometry Nodes modifier : On a new object, add a Geometry Nodes modifier. Do the boolean difference of Object A with B, and then B with A. You'll end up with two meshes separated by one or several edge lines at their intersection. Then compute the distance between each vertex of one of the meshes and the vertices ...


3

Create a plane, TAB, CTRL-SHIFT-B -> move your mouse as you desire it, then object -> convert to curve


2

If you make a non closed bezier curve and turn up the Depth under Bevel will make a tube for you. You can tick the Fill Caps box if you want the tube to be closed. Like this: Ian Hubert has a fun and helpfull little tutorial on making pipes in Blender.


2

Your curve is a Poly curve. It's not very flexible. But you can convert it to a Nurbs curve. Edit the curve, select one vertice and set the Spline Type to NURBS. The path will become much more flexible. Now extrude (E) the path at both ends 1x to restore the length of the ends. Then subdivide the segments to add more vertices (menu Segments > Subdivide)....


2

What you are looking for is the "tilt" of your control point. You can change it via the Tilt modal, shortcut ⎈ CtrlT, or access it from the sidebar:


2

you can do it with geometry nodes like this: Note: For your case you won't need the resample curve node. The geometry nodes modifier is added to the curve in my example. update: if you want to "align" the rotation of instanced objects to the curve you can use this node setup: ** UPDATE ** try this setup here: result: I know, in the beginning/...


2

you could do it "in a way" manually by this node setup:


2

I think the fundamental fact you are missing is that the Join Geometry is not a "weld geometry" node. Join Geometry gathers different elements from a node tree into a single output, but it doesn't alter geometry in any way. It won't "merge" meshes or curves, nor will it join separate peaces by welding nearby vertex into a single ...


2

There's a Quadrilateral curve primitive that works with Fill Curve. It's present in 3.1 Alpha (not sure about 3.0).


1

Seams like you have 2 main problems with the material. 1. The gradient texture moves transparent part too far from the scalp (guessing that it's curves beginning). Move it a little. 2. Too wide transparent streaks. Try to tight them up by moving points on the color ramp that controls that aspect closer to black (cause your mix shader that mixes transparent ...


1

In Blender 3.0 and 3.1 you can use curve to point node to rotate instances along curve. Also you should try to capture attribute from curve to make additional changes in instances along curve. I give a bit more complex answer here: Geonodes: Apply point index to group node input I hope it is ok that i copypaste a part of my own answer.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible