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21

First method: This one will work only for external Edge Loop and will give ugly ngon, so it's just for the pure knowledge. Better skip to second one. Select corner vertex, press CTRL+SHIFT+B, move mouse to get desired angle, use scroll to get more vertices. You can tweak it as well in in Tools Panel. Second method: This is with proper/clean/nice looking ...


15

Update to the answer below I see actually that it has 12 sides, so create 36 segments not 24, and change your edge selections accordingly and the 'Auto Smooth' value I'm pretty new to Blender and I had a quick go at this using a feature I learned about today "Auto Smooth". Looking at the lampshade, it looks like it has 6 sides, so I created the UV ...


13

A Gothic vault is usually the intersection of Gothic arch prisms. For the basic shape: Starting with a quarter of a circle, Z up, X accross, snap set to Vertex' and'Active' Duplicate the vertex on X=0, drop it in Z, to give something to snap to Under a mirror modifier in X with 'Merge' and 'Clip' checked, select all the vertices on the arc with the desired ...


13

You're actually super close to getting what you want. The default circle shape of bevels just makes it really hard to see. The reason for this is because you're trying to twist a smooth, cylindrical object. Twisting a smooth cylinder results in another smooth cylinder, up until the point where you twist more than the geometry allows, which is what you see in ...


12

Using vertex groups should work. First select the top edges and add a vertex group, then click on "Assign". Then in the "Bevel" modifier set the "Limit Method" to "Vertex Group" and then select the vertex group you created.


11

You have an hidden internal face. Doing Search (F3) > "Select Non Manifold" reveals the problem: In this case, all you need to do is to remove the face: X > "Faces". Note: if you use the Bevel modifier with "Clamp Overlap", it probably works, without the need to fix the topology. But this is a bad practice as you can then easily forget ...


10

Check the Curve Radius property. Under Edit Mode each vertex has a Radius value that acts as a scaling factor for the bevel width. If the bevel width is $9$ units, and bevel $0.5$ then you will end up with a bevel of $4.5$ units. It will also affect the scale of bevel objects. You can control per Vertex Radius from the Properties Shelf in Edit Mode under the ...


10

Front row: Subdivided Plane Central faces selected: Loop Tools > Circle ( or Space Bar > Circle ) Delete appropriate faces Back row: Extrude Bevel Modifier, angle-based, (not catching curve), Segments:2 Profile:1 Subdivision Modifier (Close-up of bevel result)


9

There is currently no way to have multiple materials using a single curve and a profile object. You could have a single material containing 2 different shaders, but you would need a way to separate what material is for what part of the object. One way to do that would be to use a bevel object curve composed of two separate splines inside. You could flip ...


9

I guess somebody has to suggest a cloth simulation, although I'm not sure it will meet your specifications. The curves resulting from pinning and tension don't appear to be catenaries, until the tension is wound up to an unrealistic level. The topology is as shown, with the selected vertex-groups pinned in the simulation: The edges between planes have also ...


9

It controls whether to keep intersecting edges perpendicular to the bevel direction. Loopslide On: gives smoother bevel result and prevents overlapping faces Loopslide Off: keeps perpendicular edges and even bevel width


8

You can simply use any attribute for the bevel radius. I painted some vertex colors for example and connected them with the bevel radius input.


8

I have similar problems and I really miss nondestructive booleans, but your's is kinda easy to fix. Let's say you have this ugly topology here: If you still have the original scanned mesh in place, you don't need to do this: Select all the tris, duplicate them and separate them into their own object. Then extrude and scale both rims to have more surface ...


8

This is really a subjective topic and I don't think it can be answered with 100% certainty for you. Some high-level modelers will use sub-d's on a model like this, while others will not; it just depends on the the person and not necessarily the model, although the model itself is a factor. You also have to consider how the model is going to be used: Is it ...


8

Yes. No. It depends. Objects with bevel are indeed more realistically looking and as probably you know by now, there is not a single known object perfectly sharp. Even sharpest knife in some tremendous magnification will show some "bevel" on its edge. Question is, when do you need to show it. Firstly lets get trough most commonly used bevel cases. Bevel ...


8

This is rather easy to do. Just add a Simple Deform Modifier. Set it to Bend and select the right axis. Enter the desired angle (it's 45° by default) Note: In this case bending along the Z axis doesn't work as expected. To make it work, rotate the object's origin by -90°, or use an empty rotated by -90°. Thanks to @lemon, @plem and @robin-betts for ...


8

Absolutely nothing wrong with @David Wilson's answer.. this is a more Subdiv. approach.. Under 2 levels of subdivision.. On a 36 sided UV sphere, pole vertices deleted, select every sixth longitude (select 2 edges at the right spacing, CtrlShiftNupad + to progressively select the rest, then Header > Select menu > Loops > Edge loops) CtrlB Bevel ...


7

In general you want to change the curvature of the corner from the square face to something more rounded. One method to get there is to make corner vertices as if they were inset and bevel the result. Start with the square face in the corner. Select both vertices in the inner and in the outer parts of the corner. Use the Connect Vertex Path tool with J to ...


7

You could use your geometrical pattern as background blueprint, then: Create a circle, extrude inwards (as suggested by the other answers, the Spin or Screw tools might be more convenient ways to create the initial shape): Only keep a segment and delete its inner faces: Extrude upwards, don't forget to recalculate the normals: Give it thickness with the ...


7

You can use bevel weights, which lets you specify a value between 0 (no bevel) and 1 (full bevel).


7

As Duarte said, the Curve Modifier is probably best suited for this. You can easily edit both the knot and the shape of your tie. Start with a flat tie. Heavily subdivide it along it's length Create the Windsor knot using a Bezier curve Add a Curve modifier to your tie and target the knot


7

Either Blender is rather non-intuitive, or I'm missing something obvious. The fastest way I found: Add a bezier circle and make it non-cyclic (Alt + C) Rotate the end vertices to form a 3/4 circle Extrude one of the ends and complete the circle


7

This is how the "Percent" bevel mode works. Change it to one of the other modes, such as "Offset":


7

One way is to bevel by percentage of edge length. Set Width Type > Percent Uncheck Clamp Overlap Add loops and slide them to control the angle


7

Clamp Overlap option prevent two bevels overlap each other. Basically it clamps bevel width by the shortest distance between two beveling edges: If disabling Clamp Overlap reveals bevels, try to remove vertexes that's close to each other. Select all - press M ⇾ By distance may help


6

You can set different bevel widths using edge bevel weight. Set default edges at 0.5 bevel weight using CTRL+E - Edge bevel weight and "red" edges at 1.0. When in modifier settings increase width twice and set limit method as weight You can also get an artifacts because of using subsurf after bevel. But, its easy to fix:


6

Final: Steps: Bevel object. This will be our shape (profile) needed for beveling main neckles. You can create it from Add > Curve > Circle and: Rotate it on X axis by 90 degrees. Go to Front Ortho view. Select half of it. Press V and select Vector. Move middle point to be even with top/bottom ones (you can use Snap to Vertices). Go to Object Mode. ...


6

A subdivision approach would be to let Catmull-Clark do your bevelling Start with a level of subdivision lower than the one you want to wind up with, and cheat if you can: choose the number of segments in your sphere to fit your chimney profile nicely. Retain a highly-subdivided copy of the sphere in the same place, as a future Shrinkwrap target. Hide it if ...


6

You can use a Circle and a Screw modifier : Note that the object origin will be used as the screw axis, that's why I offseted it in my picture. But you can also use an Empty as an axis, just use the AxisObject field for that.


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