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5

It's not as full-featured as the script you've posted, but I've come up with a very simple Bake-UV-to-Vertex-Colors script: import bpy def bake_uv_to_vc(image_name): # Lookup the image by name. Easier than trying to figure out which one is # currently active image = bpy.data.images[image_name] width = image.size[0] height = image.size[...


3

If you want to bake the AO straight from your model you'll have to take the following steps: Create a UV map for your object Create a new texture with the desired resolution Create a material with a texture node set to the newly created texture. This is necessary so that Cycles knows where to store the baked AO. Switch to Cycles render engine if you ...


3

As far as I know this is fundamentally impossible. Physics simulations are sequential data, that means each frame depends heavily on the previous one. To calculate what happens at any given moment you need to know what happened before, so you must have position and status information about every intervening element in the simulation to know where they were ...


2

I tried your file. The "Ray distance" is too high. With 0.01m it worked fine for me.


2

You can't, either use a shadowcatcher plane that you composite on top of your footage or don't use Emission shader on a surface that is supposed to receive shadow.


1

I found a way to do it. The only thing that I changed is setting the Emission parameter of the Principled BSDF shader to complete white (it was completely black). Bake settings: Result: Downside: The color of the texture created is no longer determined by the "Base Color", but by "Emission". So probably any other thing going into the base color parameter ...


1

Although I do not know how to do this in vanilla blender, I highly recommend the Principled Baker add-on. With this add-on you can bake (almost) any complex material into multiple texture maps (color, metallic, roughness, normal, etc.) to feed into one single principled shader, and the render result should be identical to your original node setup. The ...


1

You should make your low poly model smooth shaded and add at least one bevel in this case. When blender bakes the normals, it ray casts from the low poly surface inwards along the interpolated normal until it hits the high poly (or not). If you need the low poly to intersect with the high poly then you can make a copy of the low poly and scale (or shrink/...


1

You are subdividing your UV map with a subdivision modifier. Go to the subdivision modifier and uncheck UV Smooth, if you don't want to subdivide the UV map. From the manual: UV Smooth How to handle UVs during subdivision.


1

In the Shader editor create a new blank image in the low poly anvil's material and set its panel active (select it and its white outline must be appear). Select the high poly anvil then the low poly (so the hp must be orange, the lp must be yellow) and click on bake in the render properties panel. You have to increase the ray distance a little before the ...


1

The issue is within the exported low poly mesh, Instant meshes generates sharp edges and custom split normals data to the new generated mesh. The solution is simple: In edit mode select all edges and click Ctrl+E and select clear sharp. If that doesn't smooth the object you can click the 'clear custom split normals data' in the object data properties under ...


1

People thinks baking normal maps is just a basic step, but really it's not, there is a lot of theory to understand here if your model is even a little bit complex. Just taking a quick look at your files, your low poly isn't a contiguous object, it's made of several parts that aren't linked together, same for your cage. So when the rays sent from your cage ...


1

Yes, a normal map can do "fake smoothing". A normal map changes how light interacts with the surface, specifically the angle at which it reflect. So a normal map can make light reflect off a hard edge as if it was a rounded edge. The limit is that it will not change the silhouette of your object. So, if you look at a hard edge from the side, you can still ...


1

You can scale the image inside the Shader editor with the Mapping node, just make this setup: Make sure you change X and Y scale together, so you don't stretch your texture one way and not the other.


1

Solved this myself by some experimentation. What worked was to isolate the parts in a previous save before joining parts and check each mesh for Cleanup issues. I first checked for loose geometry and then to merge vertices or as they were called in v2.79 duplicated vertices. I did find issues. Not a lot but a few more than I expected to. I also checked for ...


1

Solved! For the sake of better organization, I had my high-poly meshes in a separate collection from my low-poly meshes. In the Outliner window, I dragged the high-poly mesh into the same collection as the low-poly mesh, and after that the normal map baked properly (not perfectly, but it's at least a starting point.) So I think what I'm missing is an ...


1

In computer graphics, baking generally refers recording calculated information in some kind of cache, to avoid the need to keep recomputing it. For materials and rendering specifically, it refers to recording various kinds of surface information (e.g. colour, lighting, normals) into image file(s), which are then used as textures of various kinds. It can ...


1

Depends on what you want to crate. And what engine you use. You can use every single type to create a very realisitc and good looking model, but you need to know what your limits are. The more textures you use the more textures need to get loaded into the RAM. So when you want to make a game with many meshes it is best adviced to either only use the ...


1

Yes. With Blender Render, in Bake Mode, select Displacement. It's basically the same as bump.


1

(Question duplicated from blenderartists.org. I answered it there, and am copying my answer here.) I’ve seen that “Nothing to bake” error in 2.80 when another object is selected in addition to the armature. Try deselecting everything in Object mode, selecting the armature, re-entering Pose mode, then baking. Here is a code snippet that works for me: scene =...


1

You have forgot Material Settings Displacement set True Also you able to manipulate displacement by Math nodes.


1

It's in the Properties Panel > Scene > Rigid Body World > Cache


1

Uncheck Clear option in the Bake panel. By doing this, you can bake the body and the wheels separately and with different options, but the normal map will be dinamically updated when you bake the second object. So your output will be a single normal map for the two objects, which stores normal data of both objects. Just make sure the two objects are using ...


1

OK so following Leander's advice I did a baking with low res and low samples and weirdly enough, it actually gives a better result without the little steps so I completely removed them (and lost almost 4oo polygons in the process, yay). Thanks for the advice, I'm closing the subject


1

You can bake animation in Blender 2.8! You'll need access to the Object pill menu. The easiest way to get to this is by clicking on the Animation workspace tab. Then, inside the right layout panel it opens click Object -> Animation -> Bake Action There you will have access to all the required settings for baking. Note: If you are animating poses, you can ...


1

You can use two different UV Maps for the floor: the first for the wood texture and the second for baking shadows and lights. Moreover, since the wood texture is seamless, you can scale the islands of the wood UV Map in the UV editor to get the size you prefer (i.e. the islands can be bigger than the 0-1 UV space). Contrariwise, all the islands of the ...


1

It is just the same, but now the loading bar is at the bottom.


1

There really shouldn't be anything too it. A little checklist -is the output/Bake texture in your active node? -is your bake object selected and active?


1

Your normals are inverted. Some of them are broken appart (they are not united) try going into edit mode and move them, you´ll see how they get appart and break from the original mesh. You got all traces needed since the normal map already tells you where this is happening. ALT+M will join vertex together (choose AT CENTER). Another solution is to check out ...


1

Other applications like houdini and maya, softimage (ICE) have a re-time cache function. Such thing doesn´t exist in Blender. The closest thing that could emulate your effect is if your simulation is CACHED in open VDB and you export the sequence. Then create a second particle emmiter (on a new scene) and retime the flow of the particles first, then from the ...


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