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28

The method of creating textures is called Texture Baking. Different kinds of textures (normal map, specular map, albedo map, etc.) take different sources, from which you 'bake' the texture - it can be surface normals, materials, lights, etc. How do I bake a texture using Cycles bake Not every material can be easily baked into single image without visual ...


26

Note: for this demonstration I have used the character Akai E Espiritu and the animations Idle (looking left and right) and Standard Run from https://www.mixamo.com/. The animations were exported in FBX at 60 FPS. Note 2: it is possible to use pre-rendered sprites in a 3D view, it is called an Imposter Card. It is useful on assets like fences and wood ...


20

There are a couple different kinds of baking. Texture baking Baking could mean that you calculate specified data, and save it to a texture, which then you use in your material. The purpose of baking is to save in render times, because Blender recalculates all shadows, lighting and what not, every single frame, which results in a lot of time wasted time ...


10

Select all your objects and hit bake to keyframes. Set the starting and endeding frames to the frame you want them to stay at. Go to that frame, and hit Alt-I. This will remove the unnecessary keyframe.


10

You can bake the particles by going to the cache section on the particle emitter. Enable Disk Cache and then Bake All Dynamics. After you do that save your file. The particle cache info will be saved to disk.


9

Select the high poly then the low poly mesh. So the active will be the low poly. Check the option Selected to Active in the Bake panel. Here is an example: To be able to do this you have to UV unwrap the plane or cuboid and assign a texture for the UV to bake on. But you have already done this. :) To use a cubeoid, you simply have to adjust it so that it ...


9

I don't use the fluid simulator much but it seems the problem can be fixed by adding some depth to the inflow object. Currently it's just a flat plane. Just extrude it a bit on the Y axis and bake.


9

Let's start with vertext normals of smooth and solid shaded mesh: Now see this diagram how baking works and projects the high-poly to lowpoly: In each corner of your domino piece you see 3 corners baked, because of Repeated details. You can fix this by making the lowpoly domino shade smooth - that way there will be only 1 vertex normal in each corner, so ...


8

Turning up the base resolution increases the actual number of voxels used to calculate the sim. The high-res divisions are a separate, secondary effect. They are applied after the sim itself calculates for that frame. High-res subdivides the voxel and adds additional noise based on the behavior of the low-resolution base plume. It's essentially a post-...


8

Because fire is a volume, and volume rendering is slow. First of all, the baking you did doesn't help with rendering, it just caches the simulation itself. Anyway, the problem with rendering volumes is that you can't just sample the shader once at the surface like you can for solid objects. To render a volume, you need to evaluate the shader and sample what ...


8

Firstly simulation baking and rendering are two different steps. Baking a simulation calculates where the smoke is at a given time, rendering turns that simulated data into a visual representation. Smoke and fire use volumetric data, which is a block of space that adds calculations to the render. Start with a simple render, from the camera a ray goes out ...


8

I think you've misunderstood the description for that build. It is merely stating what features were enabled at compile time. It's possible to build Blender without some things, such as the smoke simulator, or without CUDA. The description merely says that CUDA Cycles and the smoke simulator are both enabled, and that the build is speed optimized. It does ...


7

Yes, Location/Rotation/etc. returns the values visible in relevant fields of the object transform in the UI, kind of 'initial' transformation. To get final one, you can use: bpy.context.scene.frame_set(250) bpy.data.objects['Object'].matrix_world.translation Note that: This gives you absolute position of the object (world space), if you want its relative ...


7

When doing simulations in blender the results will be cached as you play through the animation. Most simulations will only keep the cache data in RAM until the blend file is saved, when you will get an option of saving the cache to a folder located next to the blend file. While each simulation has it's own variations, the most common simulation cache ...


7

An emission shader with a strength of 1 will output the exact same colors as it's given as input. Higher or lower strengths will brighten or darken the output.


7

If you look in the Modifiers section of the properties you will see an Apply button (you probably don't want that one) and an Apply as Shape Key button. That's the one you want. After you have turned the cloth shape into a Shape Key, you will have to go to the mesh section and dial up the influence of the new Cloth shape key to 1.0 to change the cloth into ...


7

If you want a single frame, see Mutant Bob's answer. If you want the entire cache, select your cloth object and export it as an .mdd or .pc2. You can then bring this cache back in using the Mesh Cache modifier, or you can import it as a series of shapekeys (1 for each frame.)


6

Yes this can be done. However the solution is admittedly awkward, and this is an areas Blender could be improved. Initial Bake Make sure the point cache has External and Use Lib Path option enabled,this way each library object can have its own cache when instanced in other files. Now for the trick In the file that links this data in. In the Properties ...


6

Baking smoke is very similar to baking fluid, so I will quote brecht's answer: It's a bit more complicated than it could be because fluid simulating baking is only exposed as an operator. That means it expects an active object in the context, which is usually provided by the user interface that is not available in background mode. However, it is possible ...


6

You can use the bake selected to active feature. Duplicate your object. Set one copy to smooth, and the other to sharp. Add a UV map and image to the sharp one. Select the smooth one first, then the sharp one (so the sharp one is active). Enable Selected to active in the bake settings. Set Bake Mode to Normals. Press Bake! You can also use this trick to ...


6

For a simple example, what you suggest should, for the most part, be good. I'd also like to add the following: Select Make Paths Relative in case someone wants to unpack the .blend file at a different location. Double check your output directory. Does it need to be set to a relative path? Does that path actually exist? If you're learning in this ...


6

bpy.ops.ptcache.bake(bake=False) for Rigid Body doesn't work, because it needs the point cache and scene as a context, so: override = {'scene': bpy.context.scene, 'point_cache': bpy.context.scene.rigidbody_world.point_cache} # bake to current frame bpy.ops.ptcache.bake(override, bake=False)


6

In your example, the big extruding portion is geometry. In the general case, it very much depends on how close you look at it and at what angle. With a normal map you always see all faces of a detail. From some angles it can seem wrong since they are facing away from you. Here we have some geometry represented by... geometry and a normal map. Normal map ...


6

Bake the Specularity data, not the light interaction According to the Wikipedia, specular maps contains the valuest that: represents the amount of reflectivity a surface has. These maps are used in order to give to the rendering engine the information about how the light should interact when hitting that particular pixel of the surface. What you should ...


6

I managed to figure this out on my own, based on what I had noted above. Prior to beginning, you must have set up an Environment material to render, or have set up a surrounding scene to capture. Once that is done, you set resolution of the render to a square texture, preferably with a power-of-two size (I set it to 1024). Once the environment or scene is ...


6

Yes, you can. But you need to use different modifiers for this. First, remove subsurf and use multires+displacement: You need to use multires for simplicity in creating normal map for game engine. With normal map you can create a detailed object without complex geometry, that important for game engines. For creating normal map, unwrap your object (U), ...


5

import bpy obj=bpy.data.objects['Cube'] modifier=obj.modifiers['Dynamic Paint'] canvas_surface=modifier.canvas_settings.canvas_surfaces['Surface'] point_cache=canvas_surface.point_cache context={} context['blend_data']=bpy.data context['scene']=bpy.data.scenes['Scene'] context['active_object']=obj context['point_cache']=point_cache bpy.ops.ptcache.bake(...


5

These are put there on purpose to prevent artifacts around UV seams. If you really want to get rid of them, set the margin to 0:


5

Bake (in the rigid body cache panel). Storing the locations to keyframes on every frame is very inefficient and will make the size of your .blend skyrocket. The cache system used when baking is designed for exactly this purpose, and so is naturally more efficient. Bake all dynamics will bake all physics simulations in the scene. This is useful for taking ...


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