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7

You could use a Lattice modifier, it works fine with beveled bezier (just keep in mind that when you create your lattice, adapt its size to the object in Object mode, not in Edit mode):


6

A much much much faster script to do this EDIT Noticed the edit re other answer from OP, and given zero Feedback thought I'd have another look. As OP noted in answer, Using that many operators is going to give terrible performance The rate determining step in old version was using face split and separate by loose parts operators, the latter is notoriously ...


6

Top view for camera has no translation or rotation. See. Align camera to view precisely and automatically, without manual fiddling How to convert current view as camera? Oops, realized after making gif q asked for perspective rather than ortho. ie don't change to ortho, however ortho is IMO may be a better way to make text look 2D. In the cameras property ...


5

You can use the Transform Mesh Node where the matrix is a multiplication of three matrices, translation such that the target object becomes at the origin, rotation then translating back.


5

You can choose whatever transform orientation you want to use instead of Local. if you are constraining transforms to some axis with shortcuts x, y, z or middle mouse button, you can just hit it again with Local orientation set to temporarily use global orientation anyway: This works the other way around if you have global orientation selected as well.


5

Basically you have set it so transformations only affect the origin of the object, to disable this setting, go to Options then disable Origins There is also a very similar looking thing that one can accidentally enable under Gizmos > Object Gizmos


5

You can try bend Wiper by curve object and curve object shrinkwrap on Glass. It depence on what wiper vertices you want to bend you can limited it by Vertex Group. Quick example is not perfect "wiper" rotates on its Z axis. I will have to check it later. Or Bendi Bones could work in similar way as well. Add-on Wiper for 2.79 (Luca Rood) https://...


5

Via mathutils.Matrix.Rotation constructor. Given an axis angle rotation provides just that, can make a matrix from the components. Matrix.Rotation(angle, size, axis) >>> q Quaternion((0.44383183121681213, -0.3263395428657532, 0.8345092535018921, 0.010497181676328182)) >>> axis, angle = q.to_axis_angle() >>> R = Matrix.Rotation(...


5

The Interactive Navigation controls can be toggled by pressing the gizmo icon in the upper right corner of the 3D view or by pressing ⎈ Ctrl` (backtick not single quote/apostrophe).


4

The "Clamp To" constraint and the "Track to" constraint can co-exist on the Object Constraints panel. Place the "Clamp To" above the "Track To", so that the track targeting happens from the newly clamped location. In this example, the object's location is clamped along a path defined by a Bezier Curve, and its X axis targets an Empty.


4

As far as I know object scale can only be done along its own axis (X, Y and Z). So if we have this cube orientation (rotated 45 degrees around Y for instance): it cannot be scaled in the global Z axis only. That's why we have this result: So to obtain the wanted diamong shape, you need to either: Apply rotation CtrlA and choose 'rotation'. Then scale ...


4

Nowadays, it's: (Object Mode) Header > Options > Affect Only > 'Origins'. (Edit Mode) Select a face/3 verts (Z normal) or edge/2 verts (Y along) you want to align to, and create a Custom Transform Orientation from the selection. (That's the little '+' in the Header > Transform Orientations dropdown) (Object Mode) Header > Object > ...


3

You need to set the object's origin to the center of the circular base. Go into Edit Mode (Hit Tab). In edit mode you can select vertices, edges or faces. To switch the mode to vertices, or edges or faces hit CtrlTab. Select the one that's convenient for you. The goal is to have the center vertex on the circular base selected or a loop of edges around ...


3

Nevermind. I discovered the solution. All manipulation tools have their own definition of Trasform Orientations that will only respect the TO of the viewport if it is as 'default'. As my Move Tool was with Transform Orientations = Normal, it was no use changing the TO of the viewport. Just set to 'default' to resolve. Thank you. I'll leave the topic to ...


3

You can't change the bone local axis, for example the tail will always point to the local Y axis. I think you are confusing the global axes and the local axes. Actually when you choose to display the bone axes (in the Properties panel > Data > Display) it will display the local axes of each selected bone. Same as if you switch the Transformation ...


3

GG doesn't snap, perhaps because if you use it on multiple vertices, they all move in different directions.. (I think it still could be implemented, but that's another story) G along a defined axis does snap, so you just have to create a defined axis from the edge you're sliding down, by creating a Custom Orientation from it. In 2.79, that's CtrlAltSpace. ...


3

Ok, it seems I just needed to say it out loud to actually guess the solution. Here it is: .- [menu] Edit -> [entry] Preferences... -. [section] Keymap .- [search filter] filter by Key-Binding (rather than by Name) -. [search field] enter: Y .- look for Y axis and Y plane Then just click on the key binding button (first to last in the row) and press the ...


3

There is a rule to give the proper orientation: The particle object is considered along its Y axis and this is the axis that will give you the Z (say Z for now, but see below) on the mesh the particles are. So if you want the carrots to be up (Z), you'll need to change them in edit mode so that what will be Z as particles is Y for the carrot mesh. On the ...


3

You can enable Snapping by pressing the magnet at the top of the screen. If you click on the drop-down menu next to the magnet icon, you can change what Blender will snap to. To toggle snapping via a keyboard shortcut, press Shift+Tab. Pressing Ctrl+Shift+Tab will bring up a pop-up menu for changing the snapping object. If you don't want to toggle snapping,...


3

There's the Toggle Quad View option, which has such functionality. It splits your viewport into multiple views, that cannot be rotated. View > Area > Toggle Quad View Shortcut: Ctrl + Alt + Q


3

You can do one of two things: You can select the 'Move' tool in the toolbar (T) or press Shift+Space> G: If you would like the gizmo to appear regardless of the tool you have selected, click the 'Viewport Gizmos' button in the 3D View header, enable gizmos for active object by enabling the 'Active Object' option and then enable the 'Move', 'Rotate' or '...


3

You can check Only Origins to only transform the origin point. It's in Sidebar > Tool > Transform, Shortcut: N Then you can rotate the local axis, without affecting geometry.


3

Updated based on the comment: The option you look for is the "Orbit left" using the Numpad 4 and "Orbit Right" using Numpad 6 respectively. At least in my logic that is the only way to rotate the viewport(as in the title of the question) and is not leaving the xy-plane. Not sure how "Roll and Orbit is different here as the result seems to be the same. The ...


3

In Edit mode, "Align View to Active" will align your view to the active selection's LOCAL axes. https://docs.blender.org/manual/en/latest/editors/3dview/navigate/align.html


3

The "Displacement" node displaces geometry along the local normal. If you want to push the geometry along a definite axis, you can use the "Vector Displacement" node and only populate the Z input field. Don't forget to set the matrix to "World space" in the node though.


3

There are a couple of different ways you can do this...you can create the axis in Photoshop or Gimp and add it as an image on plane and then scale it, or you can use Blender geometry to model it. Modeling it in Blender takes a bit more time but I think it gives you a bit more precision, it just depends on what you want to use it for. The other advantage is ...


3

You can enable the Transform > Affect Only > Locations option: Make sure that you have the right Pivot Point enabled, in your case maybe 3D Cursor once you've put it at the center with ShiftC:


3

Coordinates are linked to origins of objects. So, Right click in Object mode > Set Origin > Geometry to Origin will move the object to its origin which has zeroed coords.


3

So what you're doing here is using your hammer object (called Cube) as Mirror Object. The problem is that the origin of Cube is not place at the center of its geometry, so the mirrored mesh will be a bit shifted. To fix that, in Edit mode select the top and bottom vertices of Cube and press ShiftS > Cursor to Selected, then back into Object mode, right ...


2

I see two workarounds: 1. Object origin If you have no need to keep the origin of the triangle in its geometry center, you can just move it at the same coords of the cube's origin: Select the cube; Press SHIFT+S and click "Cursor to Selected" in the dropdown menu; Select the triangle; press CTRLSHIFTALTC and click "Origin to 3D Cursor" in the dropdown ...


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