5

Create an armature with 2 bones: Lid and Box. Parent Lid to Box. Parent the box object to the armature with the Empty Groups mode. Select the vertices that are supposed to be controlled by the lid bone and go into the Object Data panel > Vertex Groups, select Lid and click Assign. Same thing for the box vertices.


2

You parented the armatures to the mesh as children. That's not what you want. The mesh needs to be parented to the armature called rig which was created from the metarig. First, you need to clear the parent relationship. In Object mode, select the rig armature and clear its parent (Alt+P). Do the same for the metarig. Hide the metarig or move it to an ...


2

Automatic weight paint isn't perfect, and what has probably happened is that the thumb mesh has vertices in more than one vertex group, that is assigned to more than one bone. When you pull the thumb, the influence of the other vertex group (and thus bone) interacts, so the mesh distorts. If you go into edit model on the mesh and select one of the vertices ...


2

"The rotation origin of each bone is defined by the location of the bone." Yup, that's correct-- specifically, defined by the location of the head of the bone. "It actually seems like the origin is actually 'accumulated'." That's also correct. Each bone has a transformation that is inherited by its children. Each transformation is a ...


1

As far as I know, with running bpy.ops.armature.duplicate() the new bones are connected by default. Not so when using edit_bones.new(). So insert b.use_connect = True at the end of the if i: block to connect bones with parents.


1

If the original animation data-- the data that you want to import into Blender and use to recreate those animations in Blender-- provides the world space location of each individual bone, for each individual bone, then it is very likely that you have a completely deconstructed armature: at rest, every single bone is at the world origin, pointing in world ...


1

You can subdivide the bone. Then to recalculate the influence you can try this: Select the armature, shift select the object, switch to Weight Paint mode, select the bone you want, go into the Weights panel and choose Assign Automatic from Bones: If it doesn't work right, you need to paint manually. Or you can assign the vertices to the correct group in the ...


1

When you parented your character to the rig so that you could pose it, it created a set of vertex groups, one for each bone. (Either you used 'with automatic weights'; or 'with empty groups' and then weight painting) Joining the clothes to the character does not add the clothes vertices to those vertex groups. The vertex groups are what tell Blender what ...


1

You have duplicate vertices in your mesh. When you attempted to parent the mesh to the rig, an error flashed on the bottom of the screen and you must not have noticed it: 99 times out of 100 this means You have duplicate vertices in your mesh. Blender's algorithm for automatically assigning weights will fail if the mesh isn't manifold, and this is the ...


1

This is due to the nature of the Lattice modifier and the GP objects: the lattice move vertices, when you scale the lattice you're not scaling the drawings, you're moving their vertices closer to each other but their stroke thickness remains unchanged. A workaround is to add a thickness modifier, select in pose mode an appropriate bone (maybe a Root bone if ...


1

You probably have not selected the vertices behind each element of the mesh, as a result they're being left behind and the faces between them and the selected are getting heavily stretched. The solution is to either do your selection in Wireframe mode (z) or run Select Linked (Ctrl + L) to also select the rear verts


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