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zeffii
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If your geometry has true interior faces

like this vastly simplified example:

A = simplified geometry B = simplified geometry, bisected so you can see part of the interior geometry

enter image description here

Then all you do is hover your mouse over the outer surface, and hit L then Blender will select only the outer surface.

enter image description here

you can invert selection, with the usual Ctrl+I.

enter image description here

then hit X to delete.

enter image description here

for all intents and purposes, the resulting mesh is 'solid'. (notice the wormhole... like in your mandible) In Polygon modeling tools like Blender we don't have a meaningful need for 'solidness' like you might have from AutoCAD or Solidworks. As long as your outer surface is manifold, (contains no holes) and has no intersections you're in good shape for printing in 3d.

if the input is like in your screenshot.

The reason i answered the basic approach first, is because I think you use that screen to show that the geometry has interior faces but that you have access to more complete non-booleaned model of the mandible.

If you only have already sliced data, that's a different problem.

If there is no disjoint interior geometry.

a manual way..

  • First in edit mode unselect all geometry.
  • use box select (b) to select the visible outer faces, and rotate the model around and add to the selected set by doing more box selects until all outer faces are selected. Then hit Z to see the model as seethrough, you'll notice many unselected verts, those would be considered interior for your purposes. You can also use the other selection methods.
  • Ctrl+I to invert selection. enter image description here
  • X , delete vertices.

The problem then would be that the model now has holes that need to be filled.

zeffii
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