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I am trying to use the simple deform modifier in combination with an array modifier and i want to have a circular object with its symmetry axis at the grid's center. In order to do that i add an empty at the center and set the origin point of the simple deform modifier to be controlled by that empty. As a result i get an eccentric circular object like the one shown in the picture.

Instead i would like to get that "circle" centered at the empty without applying the modifier and centering the object manually.( Something tells me that choosing the empty as the origin of the deformation should do what i want right away but it doesn't).

Below is an example of what i am trying to achieve without applying the modifier though.

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  • $\begingroup$ In this case, you might find it more convenient to use the Curve modifier deforming to a Curve>Circle? Then the centers would be where you expect them to be. $\endgroup$ – Robin Betts Mar 21 '18 at 21:58
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First, select the object, and click object > transform > origin to geometry. then go to object > clear > location. this should first set the origin to the center of the geometry, and then clear it's location, setting the entire object to the center.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for your answer. I already know how to do this that way. I was hoping there was a way to center it using the modifier itself. (Kind of automatically) $\endgroup$ – Nick Mak Jan 5 '18 at 17:23
  • $\begingroup$ oh, ok then, I wouldn't know how to do that. but why would that be usefull? $\endgroup$ – Glenn van Acker Jan 5 '18 at 18:30
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The empty sets the location that the deformation originates from. At the moment, your empty is at an offset to your object, so the 360 degree bend originates up the Y axis from your object.

If you move your empty down the Y axis so that it matches origin of the object that you are deforming (which will be the origin of the single object that you are replicating with the array), then it should form the tightest 360 degree circle it can based on the shape of your object.

You may then get a "fatter" circle than you wanted, and you will have to change the size of your object (in edit mode) to alter this. For example, scale on the Y and Z axis (but not X) and your circle will thin out.

I'd by lying if I said that I thought this was intuitive. I just had to fire up Blender to check what your issue was, as I agree it doesn't seem like it should behave like that...

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The farther away the anchor object (empty in your case) is from the modified object the closer it will be to the center of the arrayed objects. In the attached file the plane is first modified to have 0 height (Y dimension) in edit mode then positioned very far away from the empty (1000 units along Y). Then the top edge was moved up in edit mode again to restore the height. The view is scaled down greatly. As you can see, the dimensions along the Y axis can be modified in edit mode without impacting the center position of the empty. You can also move the empty around and it stays at the center of the arrayed objects.

Not sure if this would be use but thought of sharing my findings.

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