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Good day,

Ok, so here is my Claymore model. I put textures on the blade and hilt and I think it looks good but it needs extra details to bring it alive. I followed Blender Guru's anvil series and while those kinds of scratches work really well on an anvil, I feel they need to be a lot subtler on a sword. I am not sure what to add. I mean scratches yes, but what kind of scratches. They can't be very obvious like on the anvil. I also saw many people put rust but what kind of knight would let his sword go rusty?

Here is my sword

Here is my sword

But I want it to look more like this.

But I want my final version to look more like this but I really don't want to mess it up.

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  • $\begingroup$ Please narrow down your question to a specific problem, also keep only one question per post, as as many as necessary. If it pains on multiple locations then you probably have overlapping UVs $\endgroup$ – Duarte Farrajota Ramos Nov 28 '17 at 16:48
  • $\begingroup$ Alright, I edited the question but thank you for the answer. $\endgroup$ – Fenes Octavian Nov 28 '17 at 17:04
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The best way to go from here is to find some images of swords that you can refer to. From what I know, most swords would be kept well polished and mostly scratch free. If you're going a bit more stylized like you would find in a game, then some scratches on the edge from cutting things would be one of the first things to add.

Before you continue texturing though, I would recommend working on your lighting. One of the reasons the second image "pops" a bit more is due to the colored lights. The main light appears to be a warm off-white, and the second light is coming in from the left and adds a bit of blue to certain surfaces. I would suggest looking at some lighting videos or tips online to help you get started there. Lighting can often be what makes or breaks an image.

The final thing to do would be to add variations in the roughness, spectacular, and normal of your material. Once you have your final diffuse texture you can either use the compositor to convert the image to be able to control each aspect, or some other program to generate the maps from the diffuse texture.

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  • $\begingroup$ Hmm, I thought the sword was finished too but the more I look at it the more unfinished it looks. What I am trying to create is a well-cared sword. I mean, most sword references I saw were either very rusty or very pristine. I'm not sure what a well-cared for sword really looks like and I am not sure how to make those subtle details. An anvil is made to be carelessly abused all day but a sword is different . I keep getting this nagging feeling that my sword is unfinished and looks lifeless. A friend who is an artist told me the same. Do I really need to add more details or is it finished? $\endgroup$ – Fenes Octavian Nov 28 '17 at 17:55
  • $\begingroup$ That's not really the kind of question for this site. I would suggest heading over to blenderartists.org and posting your pictures and questions there. This site is more for specific questions and answers, where as a form like BA will be much better for getting feedback and advice. My quick suggestion would be to really focus in the lightning. Bad lightning can make a great model look terrible, and great lighting can make a decent model look fantastic. $\endgroup$ – Brenticus Nov 28 '17 at 18:12
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Texturing is the process of telling a story about the object, where it has been and what it encountered, how it was taken care of, etc.

More than just scratches, you need layers of grunge and dirt build up and to wear it away again to show how it was held, where it was kept. If the object was kept in a museum, then you are done. If it was handled and passed along generation to generation, then the second image is headed the right way sort of. I Don't see the scratches and pits that would show where it contacted something in battle, and I don't see the dirt from being rubbed clean and put away.

Technical answer: You can use another texture image slot image that is set to slight bump, and also affects the color mix with multiply so that you can scrub in some dirt, draw in some scratches. I suggest a white image and paint into it with gray and black using some clouds and noise set to rake and random to keep from looking procedural. Because of the white, you may need to invert the bump node direction from that image to the shader.

I second the idea of setting up lighting for the mood and effect - and I also think it a good idea to post the process on blenderartists.org to get multiple views and input on where to go as you continue.

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