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Now with 2.79 released and 2.8 on the way, have any new features been added to allow for creating a material in cycles, and then "painting" it over the pre-existing material on an object? Material overlays are easily achieved but not actually painting it on to the object wherever you like. Is there a way to define where a material is overlayed on an object or to directly paint it on? Basically, can i achieve this with "painting" in blender (i.e. the base material being the yellow paint and the rust being painted on into the crevices and such):

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ You can't "paint materials", materials are exclusively assigned to faces, you can only paint textures. Nothing stops you from painting a texture that masks two shaders. $\endgroup$ – Duarte Farrajota Ramos Nov 24 '17 at 13:02
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    $\begingroup$ you can paint texture maps to determine how shaders and textures combine. $\endgroup$ – user1853 Nov 24 '17 at 20:37
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    $\begingroup$ Ah yes! Researching texture masks/maps I have found that that was exactly what I was looking for! Many thanks :) $\endgroup$ – NBoss Nov 25 '17 at 0:16
  • $\begingroup$ Any way we can get an answer below to vote up and then get accepted? new users will only see the unanswered question and skip it, not knowing to look at the comments. $\endgroup$ – Craig D Jones Nov 26 '17 at 23:08
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stencil

Here I am using a black image and painting white into it using a brush mask set to rake and random, and that is plugged into the mix factor of the mix shader between a Principled shader and a diffuse shader.

The diffuse is a brown to represent the rust and the principled is only slightly metallic for the outside paint/metal layer. The bump node helps sell the difference between the two shaders, and if you go about painting a color image for the rust and a color for the paint, you can get some really nice effects.

I made some brushes that are on Blendswap for this actual process. To simplify it, you can use the same process but run the texture into a color mix node, using the mix factor to determine the difference between the two color inputs (images) and plug that into a single shader, still using a bump node into the vector of the shader.

enter image description here

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